Hyundai Kona Forum banner

1 - 20 of 25 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
608 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Last night I was talking to a guy at Curt Manufacturing about the less then friendly access to rear tail light wires on the Kona. I finally was able to get him to look into their paperwork on designing and installing their hitch on the Kona. It looks their engineers also had some fun (sarcastic) with trying to wire a converter into the car. I appears Curt will be making a "plug and play "converter that will plug into factory plugs. But it could take them as long as 1-2 months from today's date since they have to get the plugs shipped, assembled and final testing on their production models. Too late for 1/2 the year of Minnesota boating season already gone.

I hope to try some 12 volt wire tester pokings to see if a wire loom inside the back area contains the wires I need to tap into and go ahead and install the universal Curt converter I purchased . The wires are very thin in this car, so I am not looking forward to tapping. If will work I think I will go to a local car stereo installer and get some high end quality wire taps from them to do the job right. I will post my findings when they become available.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
608 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
I just found out that Curt will have the Kona custom wired trailer wiring convertor for sale in 3 weeks. I will post when they are up for sale.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Wonderful news! I am having the Curt tow hitch installed next week. The installers did not recommend using one of the "universal fit" wiring assemblies and said there was no "plug and play" available. Customer service at eTrailer.com recommended one that uses a sensor made by a company called Tekonsha. It is rather pricey for my budget. I will let the installer know and wait until the Curt custom wiring is available. Thanks for the info, Mainia!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
608 Posts
Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
I just talked to the guy at Curt and he switched his story saying the plugs are not in yet. So I had to use a universal heavy duty Curt convertor. Part # 59236. I have all the wires tapped on the drivers side rear inside wheel well. I will post pictures and wire colors in a couple of days. Hopefully tomorrow. To do this right, you will need die electric grease (clear) you can find this at home depot, Menards, or any auto store. You put die grease on the pointed tip on these, Posi-taps 16 gauge to 18 gauge. You might be able to get these at a car stereo install place or Crutchfield, or everything at Amazon linked here so you can see pics of the product. You can solder too , but these wires are so thin you could bust/break half of the wire wind by stripping them. Take some advice if you are not a electrical marvel, DO IT THIS WAY. You need every strand of this wire with the added load of the convertor. I posted this early so you have time to get these. You need 4 total pieces. and you get 5 or more depending on the blister pack.



https://www.amazon.com/Posi-tap-Connector-16-18-Gauge-Wire/dp/B00389R8KU


https://www.etrailer.com/Custom-Fit-Vehicle-Wiring/Hyundai/Kona/2018/C59236.html?vehicleid=201870779


https://www.amazon.com/Permatex-22058-Dielectric-Tune-Up-Grease/dp/B000AL2RI2?th=1



.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
608 Posts
Discussion Starter #9 (Edited)
Awesome! I wondered what the euro max was - weird that the US models have it as not recommended.

No small car has it....lawsuits and warranty. I just traded in my 2013 1.8 liter Elantra GT and it was in the manual it could tow 1,500 lbs. 2014 2.0 liter of the same car "not recommended" and the same there after. Yet in Europe 1.0 liters are free to tow.


The DCT will not like 1,000 and heavy traffic though. From Minneapolis to upper Minnesota during the summer get out of the main city area can be a heavy traffic affair. Next test is how can this thing tow???????



.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
1,281 Posts
This is from an article I've already posted by John Cadogan & Auto Expert from Australia regarding towing.

https://autoexpert.com.au/posts/hyundai-kona-towing-with-the-dual-clutch-transmission

Kona is rated to tow 1300kg (max) 2866 LB for the 1.6 turbo petrol engine with seven-speed dual-clutch transmission (DCT).

You can drive normally in a 1.6 Turbo Kona all day long with a 2866 LBS or 1300KG trailer behind, in traffic, no problem. Normal takeoffs in traffic - hill starts, etc. - are also no problem. I strongly advocate the use of the vehicle's 'auto hold' function to make those hill starts easier.

This powertrain has been deployed for years (in Veloster, Tucson and i30). It’s robust and reliable. As long as you are aware of the clutch operation at low speed, towing a trailer to the tip is a non-problem.


According to John, the only issue with the DCT will be backing up steep driveways/roads and inching forward under load. Also he states, "this is only with the DCT and not the conventional transmission in the 2.0." Interesting read.

I suppose everything is relative to how the Kona is driven under load by the owner. I believe one of the untold issues will be, the actual tongue weight of the trailer also. I haven't found anything yet that specifically refers to the actual max tongue weight for the Kona but I'll keep researching. However with a class 1 hitch, the tongue is limited to 200 LBS max. I did find some additional information for trailers with or without brakes; Brake: 2866 LBS & Without brake: 1322 LBS.

Interestingly enough, Hyundai states: Towing Not Recommended. So all current info is rather inconclusive.:plain:

https://newspress-hyundai.s3.amazonaws.com/documents/original/32223-2018KONASpecifications.pdf

Happy Towing!:smile:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
608 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
This is from an article I've already posted by John Cadogan & Auto Expert from Australia regarding towing.

https://autoexpert.com.au/posts/hyundai-kona-towing-with-the-dual-clutch-transmission

Kona is rated to tow 1300kg (max) 2866 LB for the 1.6 turbo petrol engine with seven-speed dual-clutch transmission (DCT).

You can drive normally in a 1.6 Turbo Kona all day long with a 2866 LBS or 1300KG trailer behind, in traffic, no problem. Normal takeoffs in traffic - hill starts, etc. - are also no problem. I strongly advocate the use of the vehicle's 'auto hold' function to make those hill starts easier.

This powertrain has been deployed for years (in Veloster, Tucson and i30). It’s robust and reliable. As long as you are aware of the clutch operation at low speed, towing a trailer to the tip is a non-problem.


According to John, the only issue with the DCT will be backing up steep driveways/roads and inching forward under load. Also he states, "this is only with the DCT and not the conventional transmission in the 2.0." Interesting read.

I suppose everything is relative to how the Kona is driven under load by the owner. I believe one of the untold issues will be, the actual tongue weight of the trailer also. I haven't found anything yet that specifically refers to the actual max tongue weight for the Kona but I'll keep researching. However with a class 1 hitch, the tongue is limited to 200 LBS max. I did find some additional information for trailers with or without brakes; Brake: 2866 LBS & Without brake: 1322 LBS.

Interestingly enough, Hyundai states: Towing Not Recommended. So all current info is rather inconclusive.:plain:

https://newspress-hyundai.s3.amazonaws.com/documents/original/32223-2018KONASpecifications.pdf

Happy Towing!:smile:

Not necessarily, the car has a clutch over heat and limp home feature, until it cools is VERY real. Starting and stopping in heavy traffic has enabled this feature with other Hyundai's with DCT many times without a trailer on back. I have an advantage, I know it is there, I know it's a manual trans with auto clutch, so I can drive it as so. I would hope I could stay in manual mode and first gear and reduce most clutching on and off and keep the heat below the over heat perimeters. Until I do some testing, I will not say you can tow all day long without issues. There is a couple mile stretch coming out of the main feed out of the Minneapolis suburbs and there is a 2 mile uphill stretch that you just inch through for up to 1/2 hour. That part I question when it's 90 degs out. :smile:



.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
1,281 Posts
The easiest way to deal with the clutch overheat warning is to put it into neutral until the warning light goes out. Putting it in neutral completely disengages the clutches.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
266 Posts
Interestingly enough, Hyundai states: Towing Not Recommended.
Genuine accessories in Australia
https://www.hyundai.com.au/cars/suvs/kona/accessories/exterior/towbar

AWD Maximum ball download 130kg. Towing capacity 1250kg braked & 600kg unbraked. 2WD maximum ball download 130kg. Towing capacity 1300kg braked & 600kg unbraked. Towbar capacity subject to regulatory requirements, towbar design, vehicle design and towing equipment limitations.

We also have a sticker on all models detailing the tow capacities in the drivers door jam.

I would not have purchased my Kona if it could not tow, saying that I had close to the 600KG in the trailer the other day with no ill effects at all, worked great.
IT will struggle to reverse a trailer, I can tell you that.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
608 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
The easiest way to deal with the clutch overheat warning is to put it into neutral until the warning light goes out. Putting it in neutral completely disengages the clutches.

I do it every day in heavy traffic when I am in manual mode. The fact here is, until we see where in our Kona's this warning kicks in, or even IF it ever kicks in, we are at the mercy of keeping in the right lane to be able to get to the side of the road. I have read were this has happened to people coming home from work in traffic with only themselves in the car. Again time will tell. I will be doing some testing with my boat in an industrial park after hours just to see if it flags itself obnoxiously early.



.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
608 Posts
Discussion Starter #15 (Edited)
Ok here it is, I did not have time to hook up the main power line from the battery to the convertor yet, hopefully tomorrow. I tried to find a way thru the firewall but could not get the wire through the wire bundle that takes a 90 deg turn. I will try one more time , otherwise I will string it outside under the drivers and driver side rear floor pan (USA). It appears to have the brake lines there to zip tie to and up thru the grommet where the convertor is wired to in the rear behind the rear fender plastic sides.



Left Blinker -> Blue wire w/blk stripe


Right Blinker-> Red wire w/white stripe that looks kinda orange.


The above blinkers are in the wire bundle with the grommet .




The next wire comes out from the upper left drivers side (USA) running light that is commonly used for running lights/brake lights/blinkers in common cars rear lighting.


Running light-> Black wire w/pink stripe


Brake light-> Black wire w/red stripe






You test these with this 12 volt poker tool, ground out 1 end with the clip and make sure your point is very "pointy sharp" Watch you don't poke yourself by rolling the poker of the wire and into your finger.



https://www.amazon.com/OctagonStar-Circuit-Systems-Continuity-Voltage/dp/B01HUZPTPS/ref=sr_1_9?ie=UTF8&qid=1532487358&sr=8-9&keywords=12+volt+wire+tester







.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
608 Posts
Discussion Starter #16
I do it every day in heavy traffic when I am in manual mode. The fact here is, until we see where in our Kona's this warning kicks in, or even IF it ever kicks in, we are at the mercy of keeping in the right lane to be able to get to the side of the road. I have read were this has happened to people coming home from work in traffic with only themselves in the car. Again time will tell. I will be doing some testing with my boat in an industrial park after hours just to see if it flags itself obnoxiously early.



.
The people with these warnings are people that don’t know how to drive with a DCT, they overheated by moving too slow and the clutch was slipping too much. Not saying it will happen with towing. More saying it could happen with the extra weight and heavy use of starting and stopping in heavy traffic I have no doubts in everyday towing there will be zero issues.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
1,281 Posts
The people with these warnings are people that don’t know how to drive with a DCT, they overheated by moving too slow and the clutch was slipping too much. Not saying it will happen with towing. More saying it could happen with the extra weight and heavy use of starting and stopping in heavy traffic I have no doubts in everyday towing there will be zero issues.
The problem is pretty obvious, most owners in heavy traffic will keep one foot on the brake and one on the accelerator. This is where the actual problem lies. If an owner drives the DCT like a regular automatic especially with a trailer load, it will slip the clutches causing them to over heat. Owners need to realize it's manual with automatic clutches. So, it has to be driven slightly different when trailering.

The ECU controls the engagement and disengagement of the clutches, through braking and accelerator application. You can't ride the brake while backing, you have to take you foot off and apply the accelerator. You can't limp along in traffic, with your foot off the brake and off the accelerator just off idle. This type of driving is what causes the clutch issue.:smile: This applies even more to trailering.

If you've driven a manual transmission and trailering before the process is fairly simple. Just like in a manual, you have to let out the clutch and apply the gas in unison. Also like a manual, you can't lug the motor with the clutches engaged. A fair amount of accelerator is needed.:smile:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
608 Posts
Discussion Starter #18
Ok, all done. I had to run the 12 volt power feed under the car since I could not get my wire through the firewall and around the 90 deg turn the big wire loom that is just below the master cylinder. I ran the wire out the grommet on the USA drivers side rear where all my converter wiring taps are. Then up over the drivers rear suspension. I might add here I spent 20 mins spiraling a turn of 3m 88+ electrical tape to the 12 volt power cord that the Curt kit provided. This gave me 2 more layers of protection. Then I came around the gas tank and down to the brake lines and through the black brake line plastic channel under the USA driver side. I pulled back ever so slightly the channel and on the outer side pushed the wire in over the top of the channel and zip tied the wire in with the zip go through the drain slots closest to the edge. Then I came up through the bell housing area attaching the wire to brake lines going to the master cylinder and to the battery.



While not fully loaded and with just me in the car I gave it a test drive with the boat. It towed very well. Braking is good to, all thing considered. Know I can bring my boat to work and fish after work at a near by lake. :smile_big:.


I also added sound proofing since I was in there. I will add a link to this thread to that after I post it.


.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
41 Posts
i wanted to share how I wired my AWD Ultimate. I followed Mainia1's instructions on the wire colors. Saved me a ton of time. If you are old like me a good flashlight and maybe a magnifying glass helps a ton. The red wire with the orange stripe was difficult for me to identify. So much so that I figured a '19 had different colors. Once I put a good flashlight on it I saw the orange stripe. I didn't remove the entire panel so I was limited on how much room I had to work with. I don't see how the entire panel can be removed without removing the driver's side rear seat.

I really wanted to find a plug and play option. I can confirm that a plug and play harness still doesn't exist. I was going to have Uhaul do the wiring but they said they couldn't use Posi-taps that I wanted to provide. Something about insurance liability. Believe Mainia1 when he tells you that Posi-taps are what you should use. The scotch locks that come with these converters will damage your wires.

I was dreading having to run a power wire up to the battery. The last time I wired a vehicle I didn't use a converter that had a separate power lead and it worked just fine. So I bought an inexpensive Tekonsha converter that just taps the blinkers, tail and brake wires. Only other connection is a ground. I put the ground on the the left most seat bracket screw.

I tested this controller using a set of halogen magnetic trailer lights. Everything worked perfect. No warning lights on the dash. No dimming of the vehicle lights. If your trailer has an unusually high power requirement you probably want to use one of the powered converters. The trailer I will be pulling has very low power LED lights so I figured a powered converter was unnecessary

Here is the converter I used: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B005S572FI/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o02__o00_s01?ie=UTF8&psc=1

I used the smaller Posi-taps and they worked great: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B077PS4NCW/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o01__o00_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

There are two hitches for the Kona. Once by Curt and one by Draw-tite. They look pretty much the same and install the same. Etrailer says the Draw-tire does not require a strap if using a bike rack but the Curt requires a strap. From this I assumed the Draw-tite is more robust. The Draw-tite is $140 with free shipping on Auto Accessories Garage.
 
1 - 20 of 25 Posts
Top