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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi everyone

Anyone have pictures of the OEM wheels from the inside? I'm curious to see the stuff stamped on the inside of it because I'm considering getting a set of N rims for my vehicle.

This is what I have. It looks like it has all the stuff but there is one marking there that says RRWK SOLINE and I'm not sure what that is. Any ideas?

Note: this is the Canadian variant.

Thanks
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Hi everyone

Anyone have pictures of the OEM wheels from the inside? I'm curious to see the stuff stamped on the inside of it because I'm considering getting a set of N rims for my vehicle.

This is what I have. It looks like it has all the stuff but there is one marking there that says RRWK SOLINE and I'm not sure what that is. Any ideas?

Note: this is the Canadian variant.
RRWK Soline is the name of the wheel.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
are the rims your looking at lighter? or provide any benefit in performance? or are you just going for looks?
Just looks. I need a set of winter tires (which I already have) and rims and these ones just landed in my lap more or less. They look better than my stock rims but are less aerodynamic so it'll impact my range, but that's not a consideration at the moment. Won't be going to the track or anything.

Edit: I forgot to mention I want to use those on a Kia EV6 which has a gross weight of about 1100 lbs more than the Kona N. That's why I was looking for data on the wheels, specifically something like a load rating. Not sure if these will handle the weight of the EV6. That said, the Kona N tires as far as I can tell are rated at 96 which is 1565 lbs. Does that mean that the rim will at least match that rating?

If you have a Kona N, can you confirm what load rating it had on the stock Pirelli tires? Thanks
 

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So your car weighs betwwen 4,100 lbs to 4,300 RWD---- 4,600 lbs AWD. The Hyundai Palasaid AWD/Kia Telluride AWD weighs 4,400. Use that as a guide, there are rims out there that work on these vehicles AND I doubt there is a different level on strength spec per same model rim/same manufacture. So pushing your question closer to the rims could have the robustness built into them for added weight class of vehicles. But I agree you want to hear it from a person who knows for sure.

Now call Tire Rack as they are 5 levels over high performance knowledge over Discount Tire, even though Discount Tire owns Tire Rack. Act like you want to buy new rims for your Kia EV6 and try to push through the common sales guy and tell them you must speak to an advance knowledge person to feel right about buy new rims for an EV weight. Ask for one of their sudo engineer/engineer they must have on staff. Say you need to talk to one of their advanced guys on this one. Then get all the info you can to advance your knowledge on the matter. Then bring up a guy at work has Kona N rims you may want to try. Then buy tires from one of those two companies next tire you need tire for the info they gave you.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
So your car weighs betwwen 4,100 lbs to 4,300 RWD---- 4,600 lbs AWD. The Hyundai Palasaid AWD/Kia Telluride AWD weighs 4,400. Use that as a guide, there are rims out there that work on these vehicles AND I doubt there is a different level on strength spec per same model rim/same manufacture. So pushing your question closer to the rims could have the robustness built into them for added weight class of vehicles. But I agree you want to hear it from a person who knows for sure.

Now call Tire Rack as they are 5 levels over high performance knowledge over Discount Tire, even though Discount Tire owns Tire Rack. Act like you want to buy new rims for your Kia EV6 and try to push through the common sales guy and tell them you must speak to an advance knowledge person to feel right about buy new rims for an EV weight. Ask for one of their sudo engineer/engineer they must have on staff. Say you need to talk to one of their advanced guys on this one. Then get all the info you can to advance your knowledge on the matter. Then bring up a guy at work has Kona N rims you may want to try. Then buy tires from one of those two companies next tire you need tire for the info they gave you.
Thanks for your input. Can you elaborate on the bolded point? Are you saying that when KIA/Hyundai manufactures (or contract manufactures) 19" wheels for example, they are all specced the same way regardless of which model they are intended for in their lineup? Basically, if they make a 19" rim for the Kona N, we can assume that it can also be used on any other car in the lineup that can fit a 19" wheel? To me it seems like that is the case but I'm not certain. I can't see why any manufacturer will have different standards or processes for different styles of the same sized rim. Seems like tons of extra overhead for no benefit.

Thank you for the Tire Rack tip. I had no idea that they have knowledgeable people on staff, I figured they were simply a distributor.

Side note, the Palisade actually weighs more when you take into account the gross weight which assumes a full load of people and cargo.
 

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Thanks for your input. Can you elaborate on the bolded point? Are you saying that when KIA/Hyundai manufactures (or contract manufactures) 19" wheels for example, they are all speced the same way regardless of which model they are intended for in their lineup? Basically, if they make a 19" rim for the Kona N, we can assume that it can also be used on any other car in the lineup that can fit a 19" wheel? To me it seems like that is the case but I'm not certain. I can't see why any manufacturer will have different standards or processes for different styles of the same sized rim. Seems like tons of extra overhead for no benefit.

Thank you for the Tire Rack tip. I had no idea that they have knowledgeable people on staff, I figured they were simply a distributor.

Side note, the Palisade actually weighs more when you take into account the gross weight which assumes a full load of people and cargo.
No, I am only assuming, that is why I can see your point on getting an educated answer. I don't see different rims for different sized cars in the aftermarket, with the exception of 4x4 as you go up in ton rating trucks. If I were to guess the N rims were for sure going to be on the stronger side since it is a semi-track car. And unless you will be tracking your EV6, I don't think it will be an issue. But don't go by my opinion, you may need to find a definitive answer for your own safety concerns. I was in the tire business for 3 years when younger, so I have some clue.

I only used Tire Rack once since it was always a pain too deal with any warranty issues and ease of getting tires. Now Discount Tire bought Tire Rack. I still hope they keep Tire Rack as a technical place to buy and study tire performance. Case in point below.


And here, the test videos and a tire classification in a group test. So you can get real good tested performance info to compare tire choice by reading the "Test Report" in the below link and examine the "spider charts".



Here is where you can see where a tire dominates a specific tire category by seeing the spider charts.


.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
No, I am only assuming, that is why I can see your point on getting an educated answer. I don't see different rims for different sized cars in the aftermarket, with the exception of 4x4 as you go up in ton rating trucks. If I were to guess the N rims were for sure going to be on the stronger side since it is a semi-track car. And unless you will be tracking your EV6, I don't think it will be an issue. But don't go by my opinion, you may need to find a definitive answer for your own safety concerns. I was in the tire business for 3 years when younger, so I have some clue.

I only used Tire Rack once since it was always a pain too deal with any warranty issues and ease of getting tires. Now Discount Tire bought Tire Rack. I still hope they keep Tire Rack as a technical place to buy and study tire performance. Case in point below.


And here, the test videos and a tire classification in a group test. So you can get real good tested performance info to compare tire choice by reading the "Test Report" in the below link and examine the "spider charts".



Here is where you can see where a tire dominates a specific tire category by seeing the spider charts.


.
Yes of course, I'm trying to gather as much data as I can. The general consensus I've come across is that OEM is usually strong wheels and typically wheels with the same bolt pattern and size of a given manufacturer are rated in a similar way. It's still a risk at this point for sure but it's getting clearer.

After scouring the internet, I've found people with Honda Odyssey and Honda Ridgeline using Civic Type R wheels for years without issue. The Type R is actually lighter than the Kona N but it's also semi track rated, so I feel like that comparison is similar.
 

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Yes of course, I'm trying to gather as much data as I can. The general consensus I've come across is that OEM is usually strong wheels and typically wheels with the same bolt pattern and size of a given manufacturer are rated in a similar way. It's still a risk at this point for sure but it's getting clearer.

After scouring the internet, I've found people with Honda Odyssey and Honda Ridgeline using Civic Type R wheels for years without issue. The Type R is actually lighter than the Kona N but it's also semi track rated, so I feel like that comparison is similar.
Most OEM wheels are cast. Cast wheels are not that strong. The next level in wheel strength is flow form/rotary forged which is between a full forged wheel and a cast wheel. They are stronger than a cast wheel but still could crack or have issues. If you want a really strong wheel you need to get a forged wheel. Forged wheels cost the most usually $500+per a wheel whereas a cast can run you around $50+ and rotary forged run around $150+.


Civic type R wheels are flow formed wheels. Kona N in the USA has cast wheels. Kona N premium package in Europe does have a forged wheel and cost around $800 a wheel.

If you don't plan to race the car and live in an area where the road are decently maintained (no major potholes) than cast should do you just good. If you do live in pothole city and do race go grab yourself a forged wheel.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 · (Edited)
Most OEM wheels are cast. Cast wheels are not that strong. The next level in wheel strength is flow form/rotary forged which is between a full forged wheel and a cast wheel. They are stronger than a cast wheel but still could crack or have issues. If you want a really strong wheel you need to get a forged wheel. Forged wheels cost the most usually $500+per a wheel whereas a cast can run you around $50+ and rotary forged run around $150+.


Civic type R wheels are flow formed wheels. Kona N in the USA has cast wheels. Kona N premium package in Europe does have a forged wheel and cost around $800 a wheel.

If you don't plan to race the car and live in an area where the road are decently maintained (no major potholes) than cast should do you just good. If you do live in pothole city and do race go grab yourself a forged wheel.
Thanks for your input. I'm curious to know how you know that Kona N 19" wheels are cast in North America. I'm in Canada and the wheel they have here are the same ones in the picture attached.

I've also not been able to see anything related to packages or upgradeable wheels in the UK and Spain websites. Not sure which European countries have that.

Just curious is all, I'm wondering where you can find OEM wheel data because I was not able to.

As for how this will be used, it's a commuter car but because it's electric, it weighs about the same as a Tuscon or Santa Fe. Won't be tracking this and roads are pretty reasonable where I live.
Tire Wheel Car Vehicle Automotive lighting



Edit:. One thing I mentioned before is that the Kona N ships with 96 rated tires which is 1565lbs. Can we assume that the wheel itself is also rated at least 1565lbs? Is it possible that they use a lower rated factory wheel compared to the factory tire?

I've also weighed the wheel and it's chunky at 29.4lbs by itself. The spoke thickness at the thinnest point is 29-30mm which also seems chunky (measured with a caliper). All that is to say that in my uneducated and inexperienced opinion, the wheel seems to NOT be engineered for weight savings and thus is heavier and likely more sturdy. I know nothing of this so this is all an assumption.
 

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Thanks for your input. I'm curious to know how you know that Kona N 19" wheels are cast in North America. I'm in Canada and the wheel they have here are the same ones in the picture attached.

I've also not been able to see anything related to packages or upgradeable wheels in the UK and Spain websites. Not sure which European countries have that.

Just curious is all, I'm wondering where you can find OEM wheel data because I was not able to.

As for how this will be used, it's a commuter car but because it's electric, it weighs about the same as a Tuscon or Santa Fe. Won't be tracking this and roads are pretty reasonable where I live. View attachment 7469


Edit:. One thing I mentioned before is that the Kona N ships with 96 rated tires which is 1565lbs. Can we assume that the wheel itself is also rated at least 1565lbs? Is it possible that they use a lower rated factory wheel compared to the factory tire?

I've also weighed the wheel and it's chunky at 29.4lbs by itself. The spoke thickness at the thinnest point is 29-30mm which also seems chunky (measured with a caliper). All that is to say that in my uneducated and inexperienced opinion, the wheel seems to NOT be engineered for weight savings and thus is heavier and likely more sturdy. I know nothing of this so this is all an assumption.
Well….it is stamped Made in Chyna.
 

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Thanks for your input. I'm curious to know how you know that Kona N 19" wheels are cast in North America. I'm in Canada and the wheel they have here are the same ones in the picture attached.

I've also not been able to see anything related to packages or upgradeable wheels in the UK and Spain websites. Not sure which European countries have that.

Just curious is all, I'm wondering where you can find OEM wheel data because I was not able to.

As for how this will be used, it's a commuter car but because it's electric, it weighs about the same as a Tuscon or Santa Fe. Won't be tracking this and roads are pretty reasonable where I live. View attachment 7469


Edit:. One thing I mentioned before is that the Kona N ships with 96 rated tires which is 1565lbs. Can we assume that the wheel itself is also rated at least 1565lbs? Is it possible that they use a lower rated factory wheel compared to the factory tire?

I've also weighed the wheel and it's chunky at 29.4lbs by itself. The spoke thickness at the thinnest point is 29-30mm which also seems chunky (measured with a caliper). All that is to say that in my uneducated and inexperienced opinion, the wheel seems to NOT be engineered for weight savings and thus is heavier and likely more sturdy. I know nothing of this so this is all an assumption.
These are the forged rims. These weigh 22lbs and the ones in the USA and Canada weigh around 27lbs. We may have rotary forged / flow formed wheels but not a true forged wheel.


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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
These are the forged rims. These weigh 22lbs and the ones in the USA and Canada weigh around 27lbs. We may have rotary forged / flow formed wheels but not a true forged wheel.


View attachment 7471
Thanks. I weighed the Canadian wheel it and it looks to be 29 lbs or so.

I just watched the Savage Geese review of the Kona N and the presented mentioned that the Kona N has "unique 19" forged wheels". It's an American channel and they are reviewing the American model. They are usually very technical too so I am assuming they confirmed it somehow, but who knows. Here is the video at the timestamp of where he mentions it:


I won't spoil the video but these guys are some of the best automotive reviewers out there. It's a good watch.
 

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Thanks. I weighed the Canadian wheel it and it looks to be 29 lbs or so.

I just watched the Savage Geese review of the Kona N and the presented mentioned that the Kona N has "unique 19" forged wheels". It's an American channel and they are reviewing the American model. They are usually very technical too so I am assuming they confirmed it somehow, but who knows. Here is the video at the timestamp of where he mentions it:


I won't spoil the video but these guys are some of the best automotive reviewers out there. It's a good watch.
I saw this too, and agree they are usually very good on the tech specs, but I think this is just an error based on misreading Hyundai marketing materials.
 

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Kona N Performance Parts

Watch this video until the end. He weighs the two rims the actual forged ones and the ones that are equipped on US models. The US model rim weighs a staggering 29lbs vs the forged rim at 22lbs. Both are 19".

This is in Korea and they are showing off the N Performance parts that are currently not offered in the US. I have provided the Korean and German Hyundai Part # over to my local dealership asking them to sell the Kona N performance parts. What is missing from this video are a few additional parts such as lowering springs, full carbon fiber strut bar, etc...

The stock US/Canada rim are cast and weigh way to much IMO.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Kona N Performance Parts

Watch this video until the end. He weighs the two rims the actual forged ones and the ones that are equipped on US models. The US model rim weighs a staggering 29lbs vs the forged rim at 22lbs. Both are 19".

This is in Korea and they are showing off the N Performance parts that are currently not offered in the US. I have provided the Korean and German Hyundai Part # over to my local dealership asking them to sell the Kona N performance parts. What is missing from this video are a few additional parts such as lowering springs, full carbon fiber strut bar, etc...

The stock US/Canada rim are cast and weigh way to much IMO.
That's a very insightful video. I like that channel but completely missed this video.

Yea based on all that I agree it's probably cast. I already weighed them and got 29.4lbs which is consistent. The question is are they suitable in terms of strength? As far as I know, forged wheels can do more with less material which explains their much lighter weight. For cast or flow formed, in order to achieve the same level of strength, they need more material (and weight). I'd be very worried if a cast and forged wheel weighed the same.

I still haven't been able to find an official load rating...all I have to go on is the tire rating of 96 which is 1565lbs which is enough to carry the weight of the EV6. Assuming they specced the wheels like they did the tires, I think the wheels are good to be used. What do you think?

BTW I'm putting Michelin 235/55/19 105 on there which are the OEM size.
 

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That's a very insightful video. I like that channel but completely missed this video. Yea based on all that I agree it's probably cast. I already weighed them and got 29.4lbs which is consistent. The question is are they suitable in terms of strength? As far as I know, forged wheels can do more with less material which explains their much lighter weight. For cast or flow formed, in order to achieve the same level of strength, they need more material (and weight). I'd be very worried if a cast and forged wheel weighed the same. I still haven't been able to find an official load rating...all I have to go on is the tire rating of 96 which is 1565lbs which is enough to carry the weight of the EV6. Assuming they specced the wheels like they did the tires, I think the wheels are good to be used. What do you think? BTW I'm putting Michelin 235/55/19 105 on there which are the OEM size.
You will be perfectly fine. Quality cast wheels are plenty durable and 99% of cars on the road are riding on cast wheels.
 

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That's a very insightful video. I like that channel but completely missed this video.

Yea based on all that I agree it's probably cast. I already weighed them and got 29.4lbs which is consistent. The question is are they suitable in terms of strength? As far as I know, forged wheels can do more with less material which explains their much lighter weight. For cast or flow formed, in order to achieve the same level of strength, they need more material (and weight). I'd be very worried if a cast and forged wheel weighed the same.

I still haven't been able to find an official load rating...all I have to go on is the tire rating of 96 which is 1565lbs which is enough to carry the weight of the EV6. Assuming they specced the wheels like they did the tires, I think the wheels are good to be used. What do you think?

BTW I'm putting Michelin 235/55/19 105 on there which are the OEM size.
I've seen flow form wheels that have the same design as forged weigh less. I don't know how they do it but I've seen it done more than once.

A standard cast wheel IMO is way to heavy.
 
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