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Discussion Starter #21
Hi Guys,

Can you tell me why some of you need to worry about long term rental? Is your Kona EV deemed unsafe to drive while you are waiting for the servicing dealer to get the necessary equipment, and the new battery shipped?

I figure I would just limit charging the car to 80% for now, and only give the car up to the dealer when they have everything lined up and ready to go. It should then only take a few days to do the swap, no?. Usually when my dealer does any work on any of my Hyundai-s ( we have 3 of them) and the work is covered under warranty, they always ask me if I need a loaner.
I had them do some non-warranty work, and in that case they said " sorry we cannot provide a loaner for non-warranty work". So this led me to believe that a free loaner was a given for any warranty work. They way they handle it , they just hand me the key for one of their cars on the lot, and when I bring it back, it is "no charge". This is why I was really surprised that some of you had to jump through hoops to pay up front and then apply for a reimbursement, subject to daily limit. (Maybe this is just a policy matter that changes from dealer to dealer).
My car simply stopped working. Otherwise I would do what you are doing. My service center supplies courtesy cars for short term repairs though I’ve never had to use that service. The problem seems to be that Hyundai corporate has not provided support to their customers or their service departments for this problem.
 

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Could you explain "Stopped working" ? Is it because the new battery monitoring software decided that your battery is problematic and refuses to let you drive it?
Or did the car get "bricked"?
 

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Discussion Starter #23
Could you explain "Stopped working" ? Is it because the new battery monitoring software decided that your battery is problematic and refuses to let you drive it?
Or did the car get "bricked"?
So, I’m not sure what you mean by “bricked”. But I filled up my battery the night before and when I started the car, it turned on. It displayed the warning and the car wouldn’t go into drive or reverse. I had not had any recall work. I think this warning has always been enabled so that if the battery is dangerous the car won’t drive. The dealer had it towed to their service department where it awaits a new battery. They have obtained the tools they need. This is connected to recall 200.
 

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So, I’m not sure what you mean by “bricked”. But I filled up my battery the night before and when I started the car, it turned on. It displayed the warning and the car wouldn’t go into drive or reverse. I had not had any recall work. I think this warning has always been enabled so that if the battery is dangerous the car won’t drive. The dealer had it towed to their service department where it awaits a new battery. They have obtained the tools they need. This is connected to recall 200.
Hi Camiade, and thanks for the update. When you say “filled up my battery”, do you mean charged to 100%?
 

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OK. Apparently the current BMS checks for cell imbalance and other symptoms of a failing battery, and now we know what it does when it determines the battery is faulty..
Apparently, it disables the car.

"Bricked" is a computer term. When a computer totally dies, and won't even turn on it is said to be "bricked"
i.e. It became as functional as a brick. Someone from India on this forum reported that as a failure mode after software update for the Kona EV. .
I would expect a bricked Kona would not even turn on. This would typically indicate a massive software malfunction, I would expect a botched software update
could do this. .
 

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You're dead right. I cringe whenever I see misuse of the term. The car is doing exactly what it was programmed to do.
 

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You're dead right. I cringe whenever I see misuse of the term. The car is doing exactly what it was programmed to do.
I can’t help but wonder if one of the recent updates will brick the car when you attempt to charge to 100%. Or at least pushed the fault-sensitivity to a point where even minor voltage fluctuations @ 100% will brick the car.

I suspect Hyundai would prefer that to a fire.
 

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Discussion Starter #29
I can’t help but wonder if one of the recent updates will brick the car when you attempt to charge to 100%. Or at least pushed the fault-sensitivity to a point where even minor voltage fluctuations @ 100% will brick the car.

I suspect Hyundai would prefer that to a fire.
Certainly I would prefer that to a fire too! But I don’t think it’s a recent update, I think it was always programmed that way. I hadn’t had the most recent update.
 

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I can’t help but wonder if one of the recent updates will brick the car when you attempt to charge to 100%. Or at least pushed the fault-sensitivity to a point where even minor voltage fluctuations @ 100% will brick the car. I suspect Hyundai would prefer that to a fire.
I very much doubt the intentional "bricking" of anything is part of Hyundai's plan.
 

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I do not imagine there is a secret routine that kicks in when you charge to 100%. But the BMS update certainly added new detection routines to catch propulsion battery anomalies.
As I recall it was discussed here (cell voltage imbalance over some limit, high cell temperature, rapid cell voltage drop as I recall). So the BMS is now "more inclined" to disable the car if any of the warning signs are detected. Before the BMS update, these would just go unnoticed, until the car ultimately caught on fire.
Charging to 100% tends to cause more movement due to swelling and shrinking of the pouch). Indirectly this is thought to contribute to developing an internal short
 

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I just received a notice from Hyundai that they would be cutting my battery to 80% with a download in the next couple of days. How is this possible. This is not what I paid for. Really sucks.
 

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I just received a notice from Hyundai that they would be cutting my battery to 80% with a download in the next couple of days. How is this possible. This is not what I paid for. Really sucks.
Got that email also. I have already lowered it to 80% due to the potential fire issue with the batteries. They are doing this through Blue Link. Take your car to the dealer to verify it is at 80% and Hyundai is suppose to send a gift card for $200. You should have received and email prior to this one on the subject. Agree this is not what we expected ut better than the car catching fire. Mine is now parked away from my house.
 

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Discussion Starter #34
I just received a notice from Hyundai that they would be cutting my battery to 80% with a download in the next couple of days. How is this possible. This is not what I paid for. Really sucks.
I would choose your situation over mine any day of the week. Unless you are going somewhere far, it makes little difference, just charge more often. And for that small inconvenience you get $200. I, on the other hand have no car, and it took 6 weeks to approve a rental that they may or may not fully cover. $200 gift card? I don’t think so.
 

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Interesting about the rental issue. The dealer where I purchased my car has given me a rental the day I took my car in for warranty issues. It was in the shop for a month each time.
 

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Discussion Starter #36
Interesting about the rental issue. The dealer where I purchased my car has given me a rental the day I took my car in for warranty issues. It was in the shop for a month each time.
Yes, there seems to be some inconsistency in how courtesy cars are handled between service departments. I would expect corporate Hyundai to come through on a big issue like this to see that everyone is treated the same. Anyway I’m glad you can still use your car albeit with less range. I’m really missing mine!
 

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In NZ we were told not to charge overnight, and not to charge more than 80%
I did the BMS recall and wasn't given any further advice about charging.
I only charge greater than 80% if I'm going on a long trip, but...
Each time I get my car serviced or go for a recall they clean it and charge it up to 100%.
As if for my convenience they change the settings to 100% too.
Are they implying100% is Ok?
 

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Discussion Starter #38
In NZ we were told not to charge overnight, and not to charge more than 80%
I did the BMS recall and wasn't given any further advice about charging.
I only charge greater than 80% if I'm going on a long trip, but...
Each time I get my car serviced or go for a recall they clean it and charge it up to 100%.
As if for my convenience they change the settings to 100% too.
Are they implying100% is Ok?
100% is ok typically, although I recently learned your battery life is extended if you charge to 80 or 90%.
 

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In NZ we were recommended to limit ourselves to 90% and that is all. By the time I get a replacement pack my Kona will be about three years old and will then have a massively higher resale value in return for this temporary inconvenience.

5250
 

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That's interesting. I got the following email from Hyundai NZ. Sounds like we've been given different information. I got this email following a personal call while I was at the supermarket.

24 Oct, 2020 "Information regarding the safety recall on your Kona EV"

As a valued Hyundai Kona EV customer and owner we are notifying you that Hyundai is conducting a safety recall globally to address a condition with the high-voltage battery system in certain Hyundai Kona Electric vehicles produced at its factory in Korea between 29 September 2017 and 20 March 2020.

It has been identified that your Kona Electric is one of the affected vehicles that will need to be recalled.

We have been notified that there is a safety concern with this condition. An electrical short in the Li-ion battery could be a potential risk of a fire.

There have been no fires recorded in NZ attributable to this condition, however there have been 14 worldwide.

Our Customer Experience team will contact you to book in your vehicle at your nearest Hyundai dealership for inspection and replacement of the Li-ion battery, if necessary.

As an added level of protection, Hyundai is also planning on updating the BMS software to allow for detection of abnormalities in the high-voltage battery system while parked.

The remedy procedure will be performed at no charge.

We will book you into your local dealership as quickly as possible, however we recommend you take the following actions to reduce any risk.

· Only charge your Kona EV to 80%.

· Do not leave your vehicle on the charger overnight. Disconnect once completed.

· If you notice any warning lamps or anything operationally of concern please call us on 0800 HYUNDAI or take your vehicle to your local dealership.

Your safety is paramount to us which is why we are working hard and having discussions with Hyundai Motor Company to rectify this issue as quickly as possible.
 
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