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My experience...

I filled it with just shy of one US quart. 2021 Kona Limited. In my last attempt to finish the quart by tilting the car up on the left (hoping to get that last tablespoon to stay in before I plugged the fill hole) most of that tablespoon spilled out the hole.

I'm no expert. Just my experience. I could measure the drain oil if that would help. That is definitely factory fill.
 

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This is a slightly edited copy of my post over at at insideevs.

At 4000km I flushed the reduction gearbox (post#171 at insideevs) to get as much of the crud out as possible - ie, a second oil change about 300km after the initial one. Today at 10,050km, ie after about 5700 km, the oil was again as black as the ace of spades. It also showed some colloidal material in the pan but not as bad as at 4000km. I could not get a decent photo of that - the phone camera picks up way more reflections than you see with the naked eye and every attempt was a fail.

Here's a side-by-side pic of new oil and what came out of the car:
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Here are the two plugs. There is about an equal amount of very fine sludge on the magnets, but clearly they didn't catch much which is a real disappointment. I think we need KonaAU's speaker magnet (post#449 at insideevs) inside the transmission
o_O

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To make matters worse, a few days ago I'm sure I heard the beginnings of the wheel of misfortune noise as I slowly drove up my uphill driveway. It sounded just like the leather flapper against the nails on the chocolate wheel, only not very loud. It varied with speed and if I went slow enough the individual clicks were clearly evident with a short space between each.

It happened only once and despite listening for it and duplicating the circumstances I have not heard it again.

Regarding the oil, I don't know what to do. It really is Hyundai's problem and their approach is fix the car when it breaks, so maybe I should not do any oil changes and let nature take its course.

But that goes against my grain. I look after my gear (pun not intended) and feel prevention is better than cure. It seems to me that an oil change every 5000km is required, but given the amount of crud in my oil after 5700km I'm not sure that such a regime will be effective in the long term. I feel it will just delay the inevitable so that failure will likely occur outside warranty. And in this day and age, the gearbox service interval I propose cannot be considered reasonable, despite apparently being required.

So what to do?

Just BTW, the oil that I took out at 4000km has been sitting undisturbed for over 6 months. There has been no settling at all, unlike KonaAU's 143km sample at post#449 at insideevs.

Anyway, I will send off the two jars of oil from today's exercise for comparative analysis and will post the results when I get them.
 

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I have ordered two Votex plugs and some 20mmx 5mm N52 Neodymiom magnets, when they arrive I will try and ascertain which method gives the strongest magnetic field in the drain plug function.
Any suggestions as to tests, would be greatly appreciated.
 

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This is a slightly edited copy of my post over at at insideevs.

At 4000km I flushed the reduction gearbox (post#171 at insideevs) to get as much of the crud out as possible - ie, a second oil change about 300km after the initial one. Today at 10,050km, ie after about 5700 km, the oil was again as black as the ace of spades. It also showed some colloidal material in the pan but not as bad as at 4000km. I could not get a decent photo of that - the phone camera picks up way more reflections than you see with the naked eye and every attempt was a fail.

Here's a side-by-side pic of new oil and what came out of the car:
View attachment 7068



Here are the two plugs. There is about an equal amount of very fine sludge on the magnets, but clearly they didn't catch much which is a real disappointment. I think we need KonaAU's speaker magnet (post#449 at insideevs) inside the transmission
o_O

View attachment 7069 View attachment 7070



To make matters worse, a few days ago I'm sure I heard the beginnings of the wheel of misfortune noise as I slowly drove up my uphill driveway. It sounded just like the leather flapper against the nails on the chocolate wheel, only not very loud. It varied with speed and if I went slow enough the individual clicks were clearly evident with a short space between each.

It happened only once and despite listening for it and duplicating the circumstances I have not heard it again.

Regarding the oil, I don't know what to do. It really is Hyundai's problem and their approach is fix the car when it breaks, so maybe I should not do any oil changes and let nature take its course.

But that goes against my grain. I look after my gear (pun not intended) and feel prevention is better than cure. It seems to me that an oil change every 5000km is required, but given the amount of crud in my oil after 5700km I'm not sure that such a regime will be effective in the long term. I feel it will just delay the inevitable so that failure will likely occur outside warranty. And in this day and age, the gearbox service interval I propose cannot be considered reasonable, despite apparently being required.

So what to do?

Just BTW, the oil that I took out at 4000km has been sitting undisturbed for over 6 months. There has been no settling at all, unlike KonaAU's 143km sample at post#449 at insideevs.

Anyway, I will send off the two jars of oil from today's exercise for comparative analysis and will post the results when I get them.

A repetitive clicking noise can simply a pebble stuck in the tread of your tire..

Fluid being discolored in a differential is a common thing - in fact, it would be uncommon for it were not to be so.

I am glad I found this thread because I know to change the fluid after break in and at regular intervals after that. And switching it to a high quality fluid like redline can't be anything but good. I assume that this would have high level of zinc for protection. But I don't think the gearbox is going to eat itself if I don't install a magnet right away....

It will be interesting to see your UOA - to get an estimate on when to change it and when break in is complete. My guess is 5k miles will be good. And after that 25k-36k mile interval on changes


jeff
 

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This is an update to my June 13th posting regarding my plans to have the reduction gear oil and drain plug replaced in my 2020 Kona Limited. I wrote up a page for the Service Department to use. I left them with the Votex drain plug and a plastic container to give me some of the oil back to look at. When I returned to the dealership I saw my car was done but I was disappointed to find out they had done nothing. First they told me there was no such gear box or oil. OK ,we got past that but - then they told me the drain plug didn't fit. It was way to small. I said OK what size do I need? They referred me to the parts department. I had more luck there. The Parts Mgr. called Hyundai - they were almost as clueless as the Service Dept. had been. But the Parts Mgr. was determined to get to the bottom of this. He said "how do they know that drain plug you have doesn't fit if they didn't even try screwing it in?" Good thought! So back and forth he went on the phone, looking at diagrams and manuals online. Eventually who ever he was talking to agreed that the car does in fact have Gear Oil. It is even listed in the 75K service as needing replacement. But the drain plug does not get replaced - only the gasket (which I call a washer). So we got somewhere. They didn't have the gaskets in stock - so he said they would order them. The drain plugs might have to be ordered from South Korea (not that I suggested he needed them) but I don't think they are planning to do that anyway. But the extra gaskets are in case when they do remove the plug they can put it back in, in case the Votex plug does not fit. So there we are. I plan to bring the car back and try again when they have the gaskets (not that I plan to need one since I am supplying my own). They did have the 70 weight fluid in stock.
But I have a greater concern about the car. Every time I have been to the dealership I feel like I just pulled up in an alien spaceship. Do they really have any experience with these cars? One has to wonder. To be continued.....
 

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Any suggestions as to tests, would be greatly appreciated.
Well, ferromagnetic particles are attracted to a magnetic field because they can tighten the flux field in the air (or non-ferrous stainless steel) between the poles. So, having a chunk of steel like a steel drain plug between the magnet and the particles removes much of that opportunity. But I'm interested to hear what you decide.
But I have a greater concern about the car. Every time I have been to the dealership I feel like I just pulled up in an alien spaceship. Do they really have any experience with these cars? One has to wonder. To be continued.....
Thanks for reporting back, Shiggy. I'm stunned at some of the dealer experiences posted, a similar one below happened here this week. It's just incredibly unprofessional on multiple levels.

I gather they didn't even change the oil? They might have thought that the Votex wouldn't fit because the socket size (the hex) is much smaller on the Votex, 17 instead of 24. But if the magnetic drain plug is a DP007 then it will fit and a washer ( technically a 'gasket') is provided. You might be better off using an independent shop employing real mechanics, provided you supply the oil and tell them it's as easy as any manual transmission or differential oil change. Many owners DIY this. In the US the easiest appropriate oil to find is Redline MT-LV if the dealer won't sell you a bottle. 1 litre or 1 quart should be just enough if none is spilt. Some Kona owners have reported that even the dealer installed the wrong oil!

Oh, by the way, if the dealer orders a "Hyundai Magnetic Plug" they may find, as several others have, that it's not even magnetic!
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Well, ferromagnetic particles are attracted to a magnetic field because they can tighten the flux field in the air (or non-ferrous stainless steel) between the poles. So, having a chunk of steel like a steel drain plug between the magnet and the particles removes much of that opportunity. But I'm interested to hear what you decide.

Thanks for reporting back, Shiggy. I'm stunned at some of the dealer experiences posted, a similar one below happened here this week. It's just incredibly unprofessional on multiple levels.

I gather they didn't even change the oil? They might have thought that the Votex wouldn't fit because the socket size (the hex) is much smaller on the Votex, 17 instead of 24. But if the magnetic drain plug is a DP007 then it will fit and a washer ( technically a 'gasket') is provided. You might be better off using an independent shop employing real mechanics, provided you supply the oil and tell them it's as easy as any manual transmission or differential oil change. Many owners DIY this. In the US the easiest appropriate oil to find is Redline MT-LV if the dealer won't sell you a bottle. 1 litre or 1 quart should be just enough if none is spilt. Some Kona owners have reported that even the dealer installed the wrong oil!

Oh, by the way, if the dealer orders a "Hyundai Magnetic Plug" they may find, as several others have, that it's not even magnetic!
View attachment 7095

View attachment 7093
Kiwi - Thanks for the quick response. I'm going to think about going the local garage route - maybe after the warranty? I did see that part number (17121) in the diagram as I looked over the shoulder of the Parts Mgr. today. So that is the one. And amazingly I already watched that video (searched for it on YouTube) - very informative. This really is a very small planet we live on.
 

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...- maybe after the warranty?
... And amazingly I already watched that video (searched for it on YouTube) - very informative. This really is a very small planet we live on.
Well, consider what the car will look like before and after the unscheduled oil change and aftermarket plug fitment ... exactly the same. But one idea is to let them order that Hyundai 'magnetic plug' and when it arrives and is shown to be non-magnetic just hand over the Votex and say "get on with it"! If by some chance the Hyundai plug is magnetic, that'll work fine too and everyone will (finally) be happy.

That video is the only one for the Kona that I'm aware of and I like the calming way it's delivered with music and the Latino twang.
 

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Kiwi - I think they are only ordering gaskets, but I will make sure they "get on with it". This has now become a mission!! I was online looking at the maintenance schedule for the car. "Inspecting Reduction Gear Fluid" is listed at 35K, 70K, 105K, and 140K. Surely this is an indication of a possible issue.
Question for you - why not replace the fill plug as well?
 

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"Inspection" only means checking the level as you would do with engine oil, so I wouldn't read any more into it than that, certainly it doesn't imply that they know something is wrong. But even if a sample was taken every technician and service advisor has a different view of when oil needs changing, as seen in the FaceBook correspondence above.

My response to them would be that the oil specification called out in the maintenance page refers to a Hyundai product whose PDS (product data sheet) describes the oil as "clear brown" in colour. It does not say "black" nor does it say that it should include a dusting of fine metal particles, which is the oil condition present in a Kona as early as the first week according to a recently reported oil change.

Adding a magnetic plug adds "filtering" that Hyundai have failed to correctly implement and we have recent evidence that any added magnetic field helps, just magnets placed on top of the original steel plug seem to work. Some of us have installed two Votex plugs because we were unsure as to the scope of the problem in the early days, six months ago. We now know that two are not needed to capture metal particles but I would say that two is good simply because the torque spec and socket size are different from the stock plugs so it simplifies oil changes. But I also have one owner with deep pockets and short arms who balked at the cost of one plug so you are well ahead of the game with one already on hand!
 

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I ordered another quart of oil and I'll repeat the change in the next week or so at around 1500 miles. My initial change was at 750 miles. It's not necessary to do this but it's cheap insurance for my gearbox. I'll report back with results including my Votex magnetic drain plug condition.
 

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@Kiwi do you happen to know the thread length on the standard Hyundai drain plug, I will buy a aftermarket one from Repco, to carry out the comparison tests when the neodymium magnets arrive.
 

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Yes, 12mm.

It has a 10mm dia x 5mm deep hole in the end left by the punch used to create the thread.

An alternative part to the Votex is a Toyota plug, part number 90341-18057

I've located one in the next town ($45 !) and I'm going to check it out tomorrow. It's cheaply made but not cheap to buy. But I'm looking for alternatives to suggest and other than colour it looks much like the OEM part.

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"Inspection" only means checking the level as you would do with engine oil, so I wouldn't read any more into it than that, certainly it doesn't imply that they know something is wrong. But even if a sample was taken every technician and service advisor has a different view of when oil needs changing, as seen in the FaceBook correspondence above.

My response to them would be that the oil specification called out in the maintenance page refers to a Hyundai product whose PDS (product data sheet) describes the oil as "clear brown" in colour. It does not say "black" nor does it say that it should include a dusting of fine metal particles, which is the oil condition present in a Kona as early as the first week according to a recently reported oil change.

Adding a magnetic plug adds "filtering" that Hyundai have failed to correctly implement and we have recent evidence that any added magnetic field helps, just magnets placed on top of the original steel plug seem to work. Some of us have installed two Votex plugs because we were unsure as to the scope of the problem in the early days, six months ago. We now know that two are not needed to capture metal particles but I would say that two is good simply because the torque spec and socket size are different from the stock plugs so it simplifies oil changes. But I also have one owner with deep pockets and short arms who balked at the cost of one plug so you are well ahead of the game with one already on hand!
Thanks for the clarification. Yes, I will definitely speak to them once I see the drained oil (assuming it looks like the black stuff in all the pictures). Since I will have some time now until I go back for my second visit to get the oil/plug change, I might as well order another plug. From the video it looks like both the fill and drain plug are collecting metal particles.
 

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For reference here's the Toyota plug which I bought today for a ridiculous $50. The magnet is far weaker than the one on the Votex but that may not matter regarding performance. I will test it somehow but the reason I'm interested in this option (more so as a recommendation to others) is that (a) the magnet is mechanically secured and (b) it will use the same socket size, tightening torque and gasket as the OEM plug. It's identical in dimensions but is zinc plated.
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For reference here's the Toyota plug which I bought today for a ridiculous $50. The magnet is far weaker than the one on the Votex but that may not matter regarding performance. I will test it somehow but the reason I'm interested in this option (more so as a recommendation to others) is that (a) the magnet is mechanically secured and (b) it will use the same socket size, tightening torque and gasket as the OEM plug. It's identical in dimensions but is zinc plated.
View attachment 7108
View attachment 7107
I see the plug here on-line for under $10.
 

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I got my two Votex magnet plugs but cannot find the 70W oil in local stores. I am afraid the dealer will be very expensive. Is there an online retailer for it?
Thanks
 
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