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Anyone know if it's even possible to convert? Would love to have the IRS but don't want or need the AWD.
 

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I would imagine all the mount points are there.. it would just be finding the parts diagram and
Getting the part numbers.. the hubs might be an issue as they will be setup for the half shafts
From the diff.. not enough info out there yet.. I also wonder if it’s worth the Time money and effort… I am not having any issues with the current fwd setup.. I don’t find the drive to be compromised by the rear setup..
Seems to corner just fine as well. Some more seat time will tell ... so far it needs nothing !!
 

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Welcome and Mahalo Tbby18*kona
 

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Been doing some research on the torsion beam suspension used on the Kona fwd setups..
Found this write up that explains why this kind of beam is better than other solid axle options..

the torsion bar, also known as the twist beam, torsion beam, or any other variation on that theme. And it really is as simple, and ingenious, as that; a bar connecting both wheels that twists ever so slightly under duress, in order to give a degree of independence to each wheel's movements.

Torsion beam setups are relatively cheap and easy to manufacture
Under lateral (side-to-side) force, however, the torsion beam remains rigid, to resist body roll, which lets you corner with confidence. Simple, solid, sorted.

Torsion bars take up less vertical space than MacPherson strut setups and less horizontal space than double wishbone and multi-link systems, netting more room for humans in the cabin and their stuff in the boot.

Torsion-beam setups are relatively cheap and easy to manufacture, install and maintain, but they don't offer the engineer anywhere near the same amount of freedom to balance comfort, agility and stability as independent systems do.

Because torsion bars offer less isolation than independent systems, they can also allow more noise, vibration and harshness to filter into the cabin.

Now, in a well-soundproofed car that isn't driven in anger, these issues might never become apparent, let alone cause any grief.

Even in snappy, small hot hatches like the Polo GTI and Fiesta ST, the torsion beam is still more than capable.

It's only when demands for comfort, poise and stability outstrip what engineers can achieve with the torsion beam that independent systems really come into their own.

So, while independent suspension can be the best way to look after what's going on under your car, it's not always necessary, and you should seriously consider whether it's worth spending the extra money for a vehicle that's fitted with it.
 

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Anyone know if it's even possible to convert? Would love to have the IRS but don't want or need the AWD.

The only feasible way is get totaled front AWD kona and pull the rear suspension sub-frame out with shocks and hubs/brakes.




Question for JR Kona.....Does your Ultimate 2WD have IRS in the rear or torsion trailing arm?


.
 

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Been doing some research on the torsion beam suspension used on the Kona fwd setups..
Found this write up that explains why this kind of beam is better than other solid axle options..

the torsion bar, also known as the twist beam, torsion beam, or any other variation on that theme. And it really is as simple, and ingenious, as that; a bar connecting both wheels that twists ever so slightly under duress, in order to give a degree of independence to each wheel's movements.

Torsion beam setups are relatively cheap and easy to manufacture
Under lateral (side-to-side) force, however, the torsion beam remains rigid, to resist body roll, which lets you corner with confidence. Simple, solid, sorted.

Torsion bars take up less vertical space than MacPherson strut setups and less horizontal space than double wishbone and multi-link systems, netting more room for humans in the cabin and their stuff in the boot.

Torsion-beam setups are relatively cheap and easy to manufacture, install and maintain, but they don't offer the engineer anywhere near the same amount of freedom to balance comfort, agility and stability as independent systems do.

Because torsion bars offer less isolation than independent systems, they can also allow more noise, vibration and harshness to filter into the cabin.

Now, in a well-soundproofed car that isn't driven in anger, these issues might never become apparent, let alone cause any grief.

Even in snappy, small hot hatches like the Polo GTI and Fiesta ST, the torsion beam is still more than capable.

It's only when demands for comfort, poise and stability outstrip what engineers can achieve with the torsion beam that independent systems really come into their own.

So, while independent suspension can be the best way to look after what's going on under your car, it's not always necessary, and you should seriously consider whether it's worth spending the extra money for a vehicle that's fitted with it.



The only problem Hyundai is known to have the worst implementation of rear torsion trailing arm designs in at least the USA market, or at least it did. I know, I had it on my 2013 Elantra GT. A rear bar and and new KYB's only helped a very small percentage.


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The only feasible way is get totaled front AWD kona and pull the rear suspension sub-frame out with shocks and hubs/brakes.




Question for JR Kona.....Does your Ultimate 2WD have IRS in the rear or torsion trailing arm?
Suspension Type - Front: Strut Suspension Type - Rear: Torsion Beam Suspension Type - Front: Strut Suspension Type - Rear: Torsion Beam

Works well!:smile:

Multi-link for the AWD
 

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The only problem Hyundai is known to have the worst implementation of rear torsion trailing arm designs in at least the USA market, or at least it did. I know, I had it on my 2013 Elantra GT. A rear bar and and new KYB's only helped a very small percentage.


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My info was based on generalizations about torsion type suspensions.. I don’t have any experience with Hyundai
Designs, well just a little over a months worth.. I have no complaints so far... nor do I think I will ever push it
Hard enough in the real world to notice its limitations..
For my caffeinated grocery getter, I’m not feeling disappointed.. nor do I notice any upset over bumps or
Extra noise.. understandable compromise on Hyundai’s part to offer an affordable package..
 
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