Hyundai Kona Forum banner
181 - 200 of 209 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
65 Posts
Over time I have gotten used to the stiff suspension, or maybe it feels like the car has softened up a little. Other than the fuel economy, which I’m getting around mid-teens, the car has been a dream. I drive pretty much exclusively in N mode and on the gas all the time to try to get those pops and crackles. But at least it takes regular fuel without any performance compromise…
Mine has been bad in city driving, but what isn’t? In my experience EPA city estimates are almost impossible to achieve. My GTI got around 16 in actual city driving. My fiancée’s CRV rarely tops 20. At this point my attitude is more or less “it is what it is”. We live in DC proper and everything short of a hybrid or EV is going to chug gas during my commute 🤷‍♂️

The flip side is that my Kona N has exceeded its highway mileage estimates. I did a road trip last weekend that was about 220 miles each way, and it got slightly over 30 both ways. I wasn’t exactly babying it either, so I was pretty excited.

N mode is still way too stiff for me on these crappy roads but I find that with the suspension in its softest setting it’s a little easier to live with than my GTI was. My custom mode is everything cranked to 11 except the suspension, which I leave in its softest setting, and the exhaust, which I have in its second loudest. I find it’s the perfect balance for a road trip and/or driving around town. I do plan on using full N mode on some choice backroads though.

I’m in agreement overall-absolutely smitten with the thing. Not a single complaint through the first 700 miles other than the navigation notifications being too quiet-which was an easy fix.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
141 Posts
Discussion Starter · #182 ·
Mine has been bad in city driving, but what isn’t? In my experience EPA city estimates are almost impossible to achieve. My GTI got around 16 in actual city driving. My fiancée’s CRV rarely tops 20. At this point my attitude is more or less “it is what it is”. We live in DC proper and everything short of a hybrid or EV is going to chug gas during my commute 🤷‍♂️

The flip side is that my Kona N has exceeded its highway mileage estimates. I did a road trip last weekend that was about 220 miles each way, and it got slightly over 30 both ways. I wasn’t exactly babying it either, so I was pretty excited.

N mode is still way too stiff for me on these crappy roads but I find that with the suspension in its softest setting it’s a little easier to live with than my GTI was. My custom mode is everything cranked to 11 except the suspension, which I leave in its softest setting, and the exhaust, which I have in its second loudest. I find it’s the perfect balance for a road trip and/or driving around town. I do plan on using full N mode on some choice backroads though.

I’m in agreement overall-absolutely smitten with the thing. Not a single complaint through the first 700 miles other than the navigation notifications being too quiet-which was an easy fix.
I'm about to hit 8,000 miles and I still grin every single day. When driven carefully fuel economy isn't even that bad... I drove one of my employees home yesterday with mostly freeway miles and easily got 27 mpg. But c'mon, it's an N and of course I'm gonna drive it like it was meant to be lol. I'm now "all-N" with Hyundai's performance products and honestly can't wait for them to unveil the Ioniq 5 N.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
93 Posts
I'm about to hit 8,000 miles and I still grin every single day. When driven carefully fuel economy isn't even that bad... I drove one of my employees home yesterday with mostly freeway miles and easily got 27 mpg. But c'mon, it's an N and of course I'm gonna drive it like it was meant to be lol. I'm now "all-N" with Hyundai's performance products and honestly can't wait for them to unveil the Ioniq 5 N.
I hope Hyundai actually releases the MR car. I definitely buy that if it ends up being under 50k. As for the Ioniq 5 N, it has to deliver more performance than what the Kia GT model will have, otherwise the N badge will lose its footing as a performance badge.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
65 Posts
I'm about to hit 8,000 miles and I still grin every single day. When driven carefully fuel economy isn't even that bad... I drove one of my employees home yesterday with mostly freeway miles and easily got 27 mpg. But c'mon, it's an N and of course I'm gonna drive it like it was meant to be lol. I'm now "all-N" with Hyundai's performance products and honestly can't wait for them to unveil the Ioniq 5 N.
I’ve also driven the Elantra N and loved it as well. I’d personally rather have my Kona N because I think it’s comfier and I prefer the styling/need a hatch, but it’s also a mind blowing car. I too am all “N” haha. There’s something cool about being an early adapter and getting in on the ground floor. Hyundai is doing something really unique and special with these cars…and I think their approach of going for pure driving joy rather than lap times means they’re great options for regular people who don’t plan on tracking them all the time.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
141 Posts
Discussion Starter · #185 ·
I hope Hyundai actually releases the MR car. I definitely buy that if it ends up being under 50k. As for the Ioniq 5 N, it has to deliver more performance than what the Kia GT model will have, otherwise the N badge will lose its footing as a performance badge.
From what I can tell, Kia tends to lean a little more towards luxury while Hyundai leans more towards performance. I doubt it will be under $50k though. Mid to high $50's sounds more realistic. A lot of money for sure, but still cheaper than a Model Y performance.

The problem with electric cars is that they have a lot less personality than ICE cars, and that makes it hard for them to differentiate from one another. They have no engine, transmission, or exhaust, which for me pretty much defines a performance car. The only real gimmick of EV's is the instant torque off the line. But if you blindfolded me, I wouldn't be able to tell you whether I'm behind a Taycan Turbo S or a Model S Plaid...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
141 Posts
Discussion Starter · #186 ·
I’ve also driven the Elantra N and loved it as well. I’d personally rather have my Kona N because I think it’s comfier and I prefer the styling/need a hatch, but it’s also a mind blowing car. I too am all “N” haha. There’s something cool about being an early adapter and getting in on the ground floor. Hyundai is doing something really unique and special with these cars…and I think their approach of going for pure driving joy rather than lap times means they’re great options for regular people who don’t plan on tracking them all the time.
I think all three of the N cars are great, but like you said the Kona is the most practical and IMHO the most attractive of the group. It might be the least track capable of the three, but it's nice to know it can still go on a track. In fact, I'm planning to do at least one or two track days with it this summer!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
93 Posts
From what I can tell, Kia tends to lean a little more towards luxury while Hyundai leans more towards performance. I doubt it will be under $50k though. Mid to high $50's sounds more realistic. A lot of money for sure, but still cheaper than a Model Y performance.

The problem with electric cars is that they have a lot less personality than ICE cars, and that makes it hard for them to differentiate from one another. They have no engine, transmission, or exhaust, which for me pretty much defines a performance car. The only real gimmick of EV's is the instant torque off the line. But if you blindfolded me, I wouldn't be able to tell you whether I'm behind a Taycan Turbo S or a Model S Plaid...
Kia has performance car in their GT models with the GT line models being performance looks without the performance enhancements.

Hyundai performance models are suppose to be the N-Line and track cars are the full blown N models. Hyundai failed a bit with the NLine for their SUV because they only really got performance looks. Hyundai could fix this going forward.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
141 Posts
Discussion Starter · #188 ·
Kia has performance car in their GT models with the GT line models being performance looks without the performance enhancements.

Hyundai performance models are suppose to be the N-Line and track cars are the full blown N models. Hyundai failed a bit with the NLine for their SUV because they only really got performance looks. Hyundai could fix this going forward.
I'd say Hyundai still swings more towards performance. A good example is with the K5 GT vs Sonata N-line. While the two are mechanically identical, GT is Kia's top performance moniker, while there's still N above N-line. Kia really has only one true performance car, and that's the Stinger GT. Hyundai currently has three N models with another one coming next year.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
65 Posts
I’ve heard pretty mixed things about the K5 GT/Sonata N line too. They have open diffs and apparently really struggle to put the power down. Once you’re moving you’re probably fine but from a dig they’re a messy experience. Also, I took the Kona N to a cars and coffee this morning and was surprised at how much attention it got. Lots of folks knew what it was and wanted to talk about it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
141 Posts
Discussion Starter · #191 ·
I’ve heard pretty mixed things about the K5 GT/Sonata N line too. They have open diffs and apparently really struggle to put the power down. Once you’re moving you’re probably fine but from a dig they’re a messy experience. Also, I took the Kona N to a cars and coffee this morning and was surprised at how much attention it got. Lots of folks knew what it was and wanted to talk about it.
Yes, too much power and no way to put that power down. The Sonata N-line is almost $33k, which makes the Elantra N look like a steal.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
1,848 Posts
I’ve heard pretty mixed things about the K5 GT/Sonata N line too. They have open diffs and apparently really struggle to put the power down. Once you’re moving you’re probably fine but from a dig they’re a messy experience. Also, I took the Kona N to a cars and coffee this morning and was surprised at how much attention it got. Lots of folks knew what it was and wanted to talk about it.
Hyundai/Kia was so stupid on those open diff cars. They could of just put in a $300 ( their price) "mechanical limited slip" like they put in the i20 N and call it a day. But it looks like Hyundai LOVES to cripple cars, so they can split up "use case" bracketing, and do it in such a bad outcome to the customer. Yet they look like they, #1 don't care about the crippled car they sell at $33,000 to the customer. Because you can sure bet the engineers who put time into the N-line Sonata/K5 GT were pissed a simple $300 mechanical limited slip was not part of the car. It would make such a difference in the car without hampering N sales. It doesn't matter, as you would have 2 great cars that people would be happy with. Not one customer pissed he bought the N-Line that can smoke the tread right off it's ONE tire in one month. It is just plain insulting to the engineers and to the customers to leave out that simple cheapo LSD. It just cripples the car way way past what it sould of been crippled to bracket it. The cars are so close in price they are not losing any money.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
141 Posts
Discussion Starter · #193 ·
Hyundai/Kia was so stupid on those open diff cars. They could of just put in a $300 ( their price) "mechanical limited slip" like they put in the i20 N and call it a day. But it looks like Hyundai LOVES to cripple cars, so they can split up "use case" bracketing, and do it in such a bad outcome to the customer. Yet they look like they, #1 don't care about the crippled car they sell at $33,000 to the customer. Because you can sure bet the engineers who put time into the N-line Sonata/K5 GT were pissed a simple $300 mechanical limited slip was not part of the car. It would make such a difference in the car without hampering N sales. It doesn't matter, as you would have 2 great cars that people would be happy with. Not one customer pissed he bought the N-Line that can smoke the tread right off it's ONE tire in one month. It is just plain insulting to the engineers and to the customers to leave out that simple cheapo LSD. It just cripples the car way way past what it sould of been crippled to bracket it. The cars are so close in price they are not losing any money.
The Sonata is a great car - I almost bought one. I just don’t believe there’s enough room in the market for both the Sonata N-line and Elantra N to exist when they’re so close in price. I will say to me the Sonata is a much better looking car and a tad more upscale. But it would be curious to know why someone would choose a Sonata N-line over an N car..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
93 Posts
Hyundai/Kia was so stupid on those open diff cars. They could of just put in a $300 ( their price) "mechanical limited slip" like they put in the i20 N and call it a day. But it looks like Hyundai LOVES to cripple cars, so they can split up "use case" bracketing, and do it in such a bad outcome to the customer. Yet they look like they, #1 don't care about the crippled car they sell at $33,000 to the customer. Because you can sure bet the engineers who put time into the N-line Sonata/K5 GT were pissed a simple $300 mechanical limited slip was not part of the car. It would make such a difference in the car without hampering N sales. It doesn't matter, as you would have 2 great cars that people would be happy with. Not one customer pissed he bought the N-Line that can smoke the tread right off it's ONE tire in one month. It is just plain insulting to the engineers and to the customers to leave out that simple cheapo LSD. It just cripples the car way way past what it sould of been crippled to bracket it. The cars are so close in price they are not losing any money.

You throw the cost of the product around like it as easy as 123 or ABC. It isn’t as most companies will test the product on the car and ensure it works, plus the extra labor need to add it, technology to monitor it etc…it isn’t $300, it’s much more to Hyundai because their 100k warranty will cover that part.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
65 Posts
The Sonata is a great car - I almost bought one. I just don’t believe there’s enough room in the market for both the Sonata N-line and Elantra N to exist when they’re so close in price. I will say to me the Sonata is a much better looking car and a tad more upscale. But it would be curious to know why someone would choose a Sonata N-line over an N car..
I mean, to some people an upscale feel is more important than performance….but I certainly can’t imagine driving an Elantra N and a Sonata N Line back to back and wanting anything to do with the Sonata, not to mention the Kona and Elantra N feel fairly upscale as is. No one is going to confuse the interior for a Mercedes or anything but it’s a lot nicer than your average economy car on the inside.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
1,848 Posts
You throw the cost of the product around like it as easy as 123 or ABC. It isn’t as most companies will test the product on the car and ensure it works, plus the extra labor need to add it, technology to monitor it etc…it isn’t $300, it’s much more to Hyundai because their 100k warranty will cover that part.

They can buy a proven "off the shelf" name brand track tested LSD and at the quantity they would order it would be about $300, when it is $700 retail. Hyundai's driveline engineers could CAD a mechanical LSD off in 1 week. They have already tested the eLSD for years. They have all the specs for metallurgy, fitment, unit thickness and ext.... but the mechanical clutch system. Then get off their ars and put it in a highly tuned car and thrash the crap out of it. If it makes it, then TUNE it, like they did not do on the 7 speed DCT. They were working on the i20 N at the time so they could easily cross reference tuning to advance both mechanical LSDs on the bigger sister mechanical LSD.

They had to be TOO MANY apologists at Hyundai with the 7 speed DCT testing. All they needed is "someone to care" and spend another 2 weeks "tuning" for high rpm scenarios. The engineers knew the tuning was crap, but again stupid choices not spending another couple of weeks tuning the 7 speed DCT. We have "tuners" now fixing some of the issues that never should of been there, and they are doing it and they are no where near DCT engineers. There are people with 7 speed DCTs that are running close in quality of tuning to the 8 speed. While we would all love the wet clutch, a dry clutch if tuned can work almost as good if you don't go past 300hp. At this level, Hyundai racing has a spec for a 1.5 inch hole to be drilled in the bell housing to allow an air flow system to cross ventalate through the hole and out the inspection port, or vise versa. It has been used to reduce heat in the bell housing/clutch with great results I heard.

So many Hyundai apologist for Hyundai's cheapskate moves from New Hyundai fan boys here. You throw stuff around like everything is SO HARD and is cost prohibitive. There is a TON of profit left in these cars, a ton.

So the first prototype "Hyundai One Wheel Wonder" Sonata N-Line/Kia G5 GT high performance car they made, the engineers said to themselves "crap this really is a POS "Hyundai One Wheel Wonder " tire burner. Let's put in a mechanical LSD, that is a very cheap item to improve this epic failure and an easy fix for a high hp high torque FWD One Wheel Wonder" car. At that time they had all the time in the world to do testing. But dumb ars Hyundai nixed the only sane/rational move to make the car take that kind of HP/TQ. This is 2022, NOT 1980. You seem to want to except a 1980 designed car scheme I see. I don't, I expect more in 2022. EVER reviewer called this stupid choice of no mechanical LSD out on a high HP/TQ FWD car, because it is just plain old stupid.

I guess you have not been around Hyundai Kia for long, as the "Korean way" is put your head in the sand", and move forward with your blinders on and ear plugs in. 12 years of multi - engine series catastrophic failures year after year, at a self disclosed cost of 5 BILLION dollars. 12 years. Almost all would not of happened, with a better metallurgy choice and on one series of motors piston squirters. All they had to do is use Hypereutectic pistons in the non turbo cars and better quality engine bearings and 5/8ths of the engine problems would be have fixed, saving BILLIONS of dollars. Hyundai turbo engines don't fail to any degree like the NA motors do, because the turbo engines get robust metallurgy chosen parts. My hypothesis is the upper top top level executives have engine rebuilding companies on the side to "cash in" on 12 years of bad choices, every year. Toyota will change engine parts 1-2 times in a mid model year to fix a problem. Hyundai has yet to fix their choice after 12 years.

We have to see if the new motors that just came out have the correct design and metallurgy choice to stay together. The great thing is, "just by chance" the 1.6T is one of their top level robust engines, if you don't have a dropped piston skirt in the first 5,000 miles your 1.6T should last to 100,000+ with normal care and hard thrashing. The 1.6T has not made it into the hall of engine shame like the other series of engines. Like my 2013 Hyundai Elantra GT 1.8 that tanked at 14,000 miles. On a steady diet of Mobil 1 and 3,000 mile oil changes. There were 55 cars at my dealer waiting for a motor when mine was in, and 300 cars waiting for new motors at certified Hyundai mechanics shop that was on the Hyundai forums around that time of mine. All the sister "other brand " dealerships of his owner's where replacing the cooked motors because everyday a new batch of fried multi- series motors were coming right in the door by flat bed or driven in making horrible noises. There is 12 years of this same smit from Hyundai.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
93 Posts
Mania1 Hyundai N Line are not high performance cars and most of Kia GT line falls into this category as well. They are performance cars but not high performance cars. The high performance cars are the N model.

I’ve been driving Hyundai since 2002, my first Hyundai was the 2003 Tiburon GT that had the 2.7L v6 in it that produced around 170hp. That was Hyundai performance car in the early 2000’s, and in 2003/2004 Hyundai released the Elantra GT styling similar to the Saab 900 cars and serious lacked performance.

Hyundai has come a long way from the days of the Tiburon GT. As for engines, my Tiburon and Elantra both could easily handled more power but that wasn’t Hyundai than. As for Hyundai today, if you want the ultra high performance cars off the dealerships floor you got three options the Veloster N, Elantra N and Kona N. The rest of the lineup will fall short of their track ready cars. It’s marketing and to ensure that customers seeking top end performance should be buying the N models and N Line.

My 2020 Elantra Sports required to much aftermarket parts and cost exceeding what I would spend to get similar performance of the Elantra N. I know where I work any product adjustment requirements multiple test before it’s sold and it cost money to do that and with a smaller segment of customer buying the N Line and N models development cost for performance improvement will be provided to the pure N models and not the lower tier performance models call N Line. I have a feeling by 2025 that N maybe dead or only electric unless Hyundai hires someone like Biermann.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
65 Posts
Mania1 Hyundai N Line are not high performance cars and most of Kia GT line falls into this category as well. They are performance cars but not high performance cars. The high performance cars are the N model.

I’ve been driving Hyundai since 2002, my first Hyundai was the 2003 Tiburon GT that had the 2.7L v6 in it that produced around 170hp. That was Hyundai performance car in the early 2000’s, and in 2003/2004 Hyundai released the Elantra GT styling similar to the Saab 900 cars and serious lacked performance.

Hyundai has come a long way from the days of the Tiburon GT. As for engines, my Tiburon and Elantra both could easily handled more power but that wasn’t Hyundai than. As for Hyundai today, if you want the ultra high performance cars off the dealerships floor you got three options the Veloster N, Elantra N and Kona N. The rest of the lineup will fall short of their track ready cars. It’s marketing and to ensure that customers seeking top end performance should be buying the N models and N Line.

My 2020 Elantra Sports required to much aftermarket parts and cost exceeding what I would spend to get similar performance of the Elantra N. I know where I work any product adjustment requirements multiple test before it’s sold and it cost money to do that and with a smaller segment of customer buying the N Line and N models development cost for performance improvement will be provided to the pure N models and not the lower tier performance models call N Line. I have a feeling by 2025 that N maybe dead or only electric unless Hyundai hires someone like Biermann.
I don’t think N will be dead by 2025. Whether or not consumers agree (I don’t have any information on how well the N cars are selling in front of me) the N cars have done a world of good for the image of their brand. Lots of serious car publications and YouTubers have spoken very positively of the cars…and they draw people into showrooms. It’s not just about how well the N cars sell, it’s also about whether or not they get people in the door…even if they wind up buying a Venue or Sonata or something.

Biermann retired at the end of last year if I recall correctly, so we’ll see if he left enough of a mark that Hyundai can carry the vision further. An Ioniq 5 N is apparently already in the works, and while that doesn’t really appeal to me personally, it’ll help them pitch a bigger tent. EVs are white hot right now market wise and there are plenty of people who wouldn’t be interested in an ICE N that’ll be drawn to an Ioniq 5 N.

There have always been rumors of a true halo car coming as well. Allegedly a dedicated performance coupe has been in the works for a while. We’ll see if it comes to fruition. But to make a long story short, I don’t think the N brand is going anywhere. I think they’re just getting started, I just hope that people buy the actual cars. A lot of people are still hesitant to buy Hyundais…some of that negative reputation has been earned, some of it is a little overblown. They’ve definitely had their share of issues over the last 20 years, but all of the big manufacturers have. When you’re selling cars on the scale that Kia/Hyundai do stuff is going to go wrong somewhere along the line, unfortunately. I’m hopeful for my Kona N though, seems like there are a lot of Veloster Ns out there that have 30-50k miles on them now and aren’t having any issues based on my research.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
93 Posts
If you are referring to the RM20 that car has been around since 2016 and the test car for the performance goodies we see in the n cars. That car is mid engine with around a 50/50 weight distribution, a 2.5t engine with around 300 hp but many believe it will have 350 if it launches and many are hoping for a 2023 model. It’s basically a Veloster with the 2.5t from the stinger/sonata.

If that’s launch my guess is low 40’s priced two seater with every N marketing item added to it. IMO we may even get a track only version of it with more hp and more track focused goodies. Who knows.

Many places are trying to move to EV cars only making petrol cars obsolete by 2030ish.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
141 Posts
Discussion Starter · #200 ·
If you are referring to the RM20 that car has been around since 2016 and the test car for the performance goodies we see in the n cars. That car is mid engine with around a 50/50 weight distribution, a 2.5t engine with around 300 hp but many believe it will have 350 if it launches and many are hoping for a 2023 model. It’s basically a Veloster with the 2.5t from the stinger/sonata.

If that’s launch my guess is low 40’s priced two seater with every N marketing item added to it. IMO we may even get a track only version of it with more hp and more track focused goodies. Who knows.

Many places are trying to move to EV cars only making petrol cars obsolete by 2030ish.
Not sure about you guys but here in the Midwest the Ioniq 5 is still a pretty rare sight. I saw one on the road this morning and my goodness that thing looks incredible - squatty and futuristic. Originally I thought Hyundai might make the Tuscon the next N car but I'm glad it's going to be the Ioniq 5 instead! The first AWD N car.... someone's going to be very happy.
 
181 - 200 of 209 Posts
Top