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2018 Kona limited.
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2018 Kona limited.
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Any cheap upgrades that will either get my more power, more mpg, or make it sound better?
Well, what do you consider cheap? A cone filter for instance can be cheaper, allow for less restriction on the engine, and add more noise.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Well, what do you consider cheap? A cone filter for instance can be cheaper, allow for less restriction on the engine, and add more noise.
Under 100 and not super nvolved to install, wife's worried about warranty.
 

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This will work, PLUS you do get a noticable (tiny) off the line bump in performance.
Plus it's available on Amazon.
Disclaimer: This is what happened to work for me. Follow at your own risk.


Tools: 8mm wrench, flat head screwdriver, and hairspray. Yes you need the hairspray.


Prerequisites: Pop the hood, pull the engine cover(pull straight up on it), and have a new intake pipe in hand.








Step 1: Get the little caps off the 8mm bolts on the clamp. Stick a flat head in and pry them out. Try not to loose them in the engine bay. If your car happens to not have these well lucky you.







Step 2: Use the 8mm wrench to get those loose. Not so loose that the metal band falls out of the tightening bolt.


Step 3: Pull it toward the passenger side and up/forward to get it off. Make sure the clamps are plenty loose to clear the lip while pulling on it. Once the turbo side is off just pull up and the other will come off easy.







Step 4: Take the other two caps off the 8mm bolt and loosen the middle section. Take the stock one out. Remember the orientation of the boots that hold it.


Step 5: Take the hairspray and put it on the section of the pipe that will be in the boot. I sprayed a bunch in a rag and wiped it where I needed it to get it evenly but lightly coated. You need this to help it stick when its clamped back in.


Step 6: Tighten the 8mm clamps back in the same spot. Make sure they are somewhat close to the end of the boot. Use the stock pipe to measure how far of a gap to leave between the boots.






Step 7: Also apply hairspray lightly to the turbo side and intake pipe on the passenger side to the outside of the barbed fitting.


Step 8: Do step 3 in reverse then tighten the 8mm bolts on the clamp back up making sure they are near the end of the boot. Ensure that both ends are all the way on the barbed fitting before tightening.

All done.


I used the SXTH pipe to do this install. I have seen them from Tork, turbosocks, and about anywhere that has veloster/elantra performance parts for about $30.



 

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Discussion Starter #7
This will work, PLUS you do get a noticable (tiny) off the line bump in performance.
Plus it's available on Amazon.
Ty I was looking at this or a cone filter, people say they give power but I doubt it without a tune. But hearing the intake would be nice.
 

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Saw this and wondered would this have any benefit on a stock 19 Kona 1.6t?
FWIW- The problem is that your car's timing and fuel delivery system is designed for the air volume that comes from the factory air filter. You add more air to the system and it won't work like it's supposed to. Don't know if the ECU will compensate for the increased air and whether or not it would affect the warranty. I never thought about it until I overheard a mechanic pointing that out to someone. I'd check with a reputable mechanic to be sure.
 

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Based on my reading, I am skeptical of washable oiled gauze filters that claim significant airflow improvement. Some folks who are critical of these type of filters, say that the increased airflow comes at the cost of decreased filtration. I see no compelling reason to take that risk, for a street car, the performance increases are probably in the realm of overactive imagination. Just my opinion, I could be wrong but :before I put something like this on my car, I would want to see some test results demonstrating that the filtering performance is on par with the OEM paper filter.
 

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Here is a test between a dirty stock air filter, clean stock air filter, a cheap aftermarket, and a K&N. He tests each on a dyno and does some on road tests:


He tests on a Subaru Crosstrek, so I'm not sure if you would see the same result on a turbo.
 
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