Hyundai Kona Forum banner
1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
2018 Kona limited.
Joined
·
949 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Well, this post is a response to the dozens of FB messages i've received from many people about issues when they try to install OCC's on the 1.6l Kona.

I've had several different set-ups on my kona, using the same Radium Engineering cans. There is nothing wrong with the cans, just issues i've had with their locations. When i had them under my intake, i had to remove the intake to drain them. When i had the cans infront of the intake filter, it blocked room i needed for fabbing up an air box. When i had the cans inside the lower section of the driver side fender, it was a PITA to drain them.

So don't follow my locations, as im sure im going to change their location again eventually. This is about actually connecting them to your PCV system, correctly, so it does the job its supposed to do.

Here is a youtube video about does a catch can actually work, just incase you need the info:

So let me start with locations. In the picture below, there is a green line on the top, and a red line below it. The green line is the valve cover vent to intake tube hose location. The red line is the PCV hose to intake manifold hose location.

4121


If you install a single catch can, the most important hose to reroute to a catch can is the RED hose. The red hose is where the majority of the oil that comes from (PCV) and deposits on the intake valves by way of the intake manifold.

The Green line is a vent hose from the valve cover to the intake tube. Your location on the intake tube will vary as i have a custom intake tube. Only alittle bit of oil will vent there from the valve cover to the intake tube. For the most part, its not needed to add a catch can to the Green hose, but it will be discussed here, for those using a 2 can setup.

Those of you doing the red line hose may find it very difficult to remove the hose where it connects to the intake manifold. I have an easy solution for that, you dont need to remove that part of the hose. Just add a 3/8" double barbed fitting to the hose section where it would normally meet the PCV. As seen in the next 2 pictures.

4122


4123


A common issue i see people doing is mixing up hose locations. Like those who connect the intake manifold port to the intake hose port on the other side of the system. Doing that will give you idling issues, loss of power, sometimes prevent to engine from running. It would be considered a massive vacuum leak.

Another thing NOT to do, is connecting the PCV valve to the valve cover vent. This eliminates what the PCV valve is used for, building up crankcase pressures till something blows out. Usually the valve cover gasket first, then usually rear main seal. Creating effectively a massive oil leak, spark plug fouling, loss of power, etc...

Another common mistake is using a vented OCC, or worse, a cheap (all/any) breather filter. Our engines are NOT designed to use a breather filter. Our engines are NOT carbureted. Using a vented OCC might only work on the Valve cover vent hose, on the 1.6T because we use a MAP sensor, BUT I DONT RECOMMEND IT. If you have a 2.0L, you utilize a MAF sensor, and cannot safely run a vented OCC, as it would create a massive vacuum leak, killing gas mileage, overall performance, throwing the car into limp mode, throwing a check engine light, if you can get the car started.

Another common issue is using the wrong type of hose, and not checking your fittings. The hose you would want to connect your OCC's with, is going to be rated for OIL and or FUEL. Dont use the pretty silicone hoses as they are not compateble with oil and fuel, they will degrade pull pieces of debris into the engine. That would be bad. Heater hose is also not recommended. Though heater hose is a type of rubber hose, it too will deteriorate from oil and fuel. Use a low pressure fuel hose, power steering fluid rated hose, transmission cooler rated hose, or an oil cooler hose. There are other options out there, but these cover the usual options at most auto part stores. The reason why you want a fuel/oil rated hose, is that quite a bit of unburnt fuel, sometimes up to about 7% will be mixed in the oil fumes, due to how a direct gasoline injection engine works. As for not checking your catch can fittings, if they are loose, cross threaded, or damaged, your going to have problems. Take your time installing the fittings, The common NPT (those brass hardware store fittings) should screen in pretty tight. I dont recommend teflon tape in this situation, just incase, as oil and fuel can eat it. If this is a fixed location, you can use low torque threadlocker, high temp anti-seize, or for a high end look, heat shrink. If your using -AN fittings, you use anti-seize.

Now in the picture below, the dark green and light green hoses are to 2 lines for the valve cover vent catch can. The red and orange hoses are the PCV hoses to my catch can. So both cans are mounted to each other, However, both sections are separated. PCV side in the red/orange, and valve cover vent on the green/lt green side. So really, its the OEM hose routing, just with a catch can in the center. Thats how it should be. The orange and green hoses traveling through the center of the engine in this picture, is below the wire loom but above the intake manifold, just a quick and neat way to hide some of the hoses.
4125



I hope this helps people, and any more questions you have, just post em, ill answer them as i can.

On a side note, if your shopping for OCC, you dont have to spend big bucks. Just find one with decent capacity, usually 8 ounces is the common size, and make sure it has some kind of filter/screen on the inside to help separate the oil from the air flow. And for easy of maintenance, a drain plug at the bottom. My cans have a dipstick, but a sight hose works too, just more prone to leaks.

4126
4127
4128


And Please pardon my spelling/grammar, its been along 72 hr work shift i just finished before writing this up.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,913 Posts
That's the same spot I had mine when I did it, but I found the 3/8 line was too small and I had idle issues , so I pulled it. Never revisited it after that. I will be going to 1/2 tubing the next try when I get to it............................... Suspension is first on my list, A CC is #5 or 6 on my list. Nice job.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
131 Posts
What I find absurd is how a manufacturer, be it Hyundai or anyone w DI doesn’t provide the solution to valve carbon build up.

Ford’s 2nd gen ecoboost is now DPI to eliminate or at least reduce chances of carbon on valves.
 

·
Read Only
Joined
·
412 Posts
Hyundai has starting 2022 and some cars 2021. Way late to the party. I think Toyota and Lexus were the first in the USA about 5 years ago. I don't know if VW/Audi even has it here yet. They do in Europe.
do these really work so i wont need a walnut blasting? the pcv was so effeciant in my gti mk vii that the oil can was pointless
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
I just got a 2022 N-line with the smartstream 1.6t…is this the same setup? I have the Sxth element dual catch can kit from my Veloster turbo and repurposing it with whatever hoses and mounting needed in the Kona
 

·
Registered
2022 White Kona N line FWD
Joined
·
3 Posts
Well, this post is a response to the dozens of FB messages i've received from many people about issues when they try to install OCC's on the 1.6l Kona.

I've had several different set-ups on my kona, using the same Radium Engineering cans. There is nothing wrong with the cans, just issues i've had with their locations. When i had them under my intake, i had to remove the intake to drain them. When i had the cans infront of the intake filter, it blocked room i needed for fabbing up an air box. When i had the cans inside the lower section of the driver side fender, it was a PITA to drain them.

So don't follow my locations, as im sure im going to change their location again eventually. This is about actually connecting them to your PCV system, correctly, so it does the job its supposed to do.

Here is a youtube video about does a catch can actually work, just incase you need the info:

So let me start with locations. In the picture below, there is a green line on the top, and a red line below it. The green line is the valve cover vent to intake tube hose location. The red line is the PCV hose to intake manifold hose location.

View attachment 4121

If you install a single catch can, the most important hose to reroute to a catch can is the RED hose. The red hose is where the majority of the oil that comes from (PCV) and deposits on the intake valves by way of the intake manifold.

The Green line is a vent hose from the valve cover to the intake tube. Your location on the intake tube will vary as i have a custom intake tube. Only alittle bit of oil will vent there from the valve cover to the intake tube. For the most part, its not needed to add a catch can to the Green hose, but it will be discussed here, for those using a 2 can setup.

Those of you doing the red line hose may find it very difficult to remove the hose where it connects to the intake manifold. I have an easy solution for that, you dont need to remove that part of the hose. Just add a 3/8" double barbed fitting to the hose section where it would normally meet the PCV. As seen in the next 2 pictures.

View attachment 4122

View attachment 4123

A common issue i see people doing is mixing up hose locations. Like those who connect the intake manifold port to the intake hose port on the other side of the system. Doing that will give you idling issues, loss of power, sometimes prevent to engine from running. It would be considered a massive vacuum leak.

Another thing NOT to do, is connecting the PCV valve to the valve cover vent. This eliminates what the PCV valve is used for, building up crankcase pressures till something blows out. Usually the valve cover gasket first, then usually rear main seal. Creating effectively a massive oil leak, spark plug fouling, loss of power, etc...

Another common mistake is using a vented OCC, or worse, a cheap (all/any) breather filter. Our engines are NOT designed to use a breather filter. Our engines are NOT carbureted. Using a vented OCC might only work on the Valve cover vent hose, on the 1.6T because we use a MAP sensor, BUT I DONT RECOMMEND IT. If you have a 2.0L, you utilize a MAF sensor, and cannot safely run a vented OCC, as it would create a massive vacuum leak, killing gas mileage, overall performance, throwing the car into limp mode, throwing a check engine light, if you can get the car started.

Another common issue is using the wrong type of hose, and not checking your fittings. The hose you would want to connect your OCC's with, is going to be rated for OIL and or FUEL. Dont use the pretty silicone hoses as they are not compateble with oil and fuel, they will degrade pull pieces of debris into the engine. That would be bad. Heater hose is also not recommended. Though heater hose is a type of rubber hose, it too will deteriorate from oil and fuel. Use a low pressure fuel hose, power steering fluid rated hose, transmission cooler rated hose, or an oil cooler hose. There are other options out there, but these cover the usual options at most auto part stores. The reason why you want a fuel/oil rated hose, is that quite a bit of unburnt fuel, sometimes up to about 7% will be mixed in the oil fumes, due to how a direct gasoline injection engine works. As for not checking your catch can fittings, if they are loose, cross threaded, or damaged, your going to have problems. Take your time installing the fittings, The common NPT (those brass hardware store fittings) should screen in pretty tight. I dont recommend teflon tape in this situation, just incase, as oil and fuel can eat it. If this is a fixed location, you can use low torque threadlocker, high temp anti-seize, or for a high end look, heat shrink. If your using -AN fittings, you use anti-seize.

Now in the picture below, the dark green and light green hoses are to 2 lines for the valve cover vent catch can. The red and orange hoses are the PCV hoses to my catch can. So both cans are mounted to each other, However, both sections are separated. PCV side in the red/orange, and valve cover vent on the green/lt green side. So really, its the OEM hose routing, just with a catch can in the center. Thats how it should be. The orange and green hoses traveling through the center of the engine in this picture, is below the wire loom but above the intake manifold, just a quick and neat way to hide some of the hoses.
View attachment 4125


I hope this helps people, and any more questions you have, just post em, ill answer them as i can.

On a side note, if your shopping for OCC, you dont have to spend big bucks. Just find one with decent capacity, usually 8 ounces is the common size, and make sure it has some kind of filter/screen on the inside to help separate the oil from the air flow. And for easy of maintenance, a drain plug at the bottom. My cans have a dipstick, but a sight hose works too, just more prone to leaks.

View attachment 4126 View attachment 4127 View attachment 4128

And Please pardon my spelling/grammar, its been along 72 hr work shift i just finished before writing this up.
Have you had that lx on your palm checked ?
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top