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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I know there is no clear answer on this, but just getting opinions.

I just hit 50,000 miles on my Kona and the inspection is due next month. The tires would technically pass (barely), but won't really last the winter, so I'll get some new all season tires. Should I replace the suspension at the same time?

In past cars, there were times when I've gotten new tires and a year later they develop scalloping (or other issue) because the suspension went bad. It felt like I wasted money. If I had just gotten the suspension done at the same time, the tires would have lasted longer.

The Kona is my first Hyundai and I don't know how well the suspension lasts. I'd rather not spend money on new tires and have the suspension go at 60,000 miles and cause extra wear on the tires. So far the car seems to be handling fine and I'm not seeing any wear pattern on the tires.

If I get the suspension done at the same time as the tires, I know that will get me to 100,000 with no issues.
 

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are you Talking about the shocks on the suspension? are you experiencing any handling issues? Do you travel on rough roads or dirt roads all the time? Your suspension should not need any attention otherwise. Shocks should get you to 100 K miles with normal use. Possibly an alignment if necessary which would cause uneven wear on your tires and should be noticeable. Or any type of pull in the steering wheel when driving. I would think if they were any slack or excessive play in the suspension you would hear it or feel it and know if it needed attention.
 

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are you Talking about the shocks on the suspension? are you experiencing any handling issues? Do you travel on rough roads or dirt roads all the time? Your suspension should not need any attention otherwise. Shocks should get you to 100 K miles with normal use. Possibly an alignment if necessary which would cause uneven wear on your tires and should be noticeable. Or any type of pull in the steering wheel when driving. I would think if they were any slack or excessive play in the suspension you would hear it or feel it and know if it needed attention.
+2
 

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If you got 50k miles out of a set of OEM tires, then you are living right !!!

I have to agree, unless you are seeing any strange wear issues (other than being at end of life) then you probably don't need any suspension work. When your vehicle gets to 80k plus, then yes-- start thinking about replacing bushings, shocks, etc.


I would like to know what tires you are getting (all-season ones) for summer. I'm gonna have to replace mine soon and just getting ideas/opinions.


Cheers
 
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