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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I have a short steep hill in my neighborhood to test my cars with snow covered roads (I live in Massachusetts). My 2010 Honda Insight, 2015 eGolf, and 2017 Chevy Volt (and other cars) did quite well on many different occasions using traction control.

However, the first time I tried my new 2021 Kona EV Ultimate under not the most difficult conditions, I got nowhere fast when the aggressive traction control stalled all momentum too quickly as I started the ascent and then I could not move forward. I tried Normal, Eco, and Eco+ modes all to no avail. I then disabled traction control and was able to get up fairly easily in all 3 modes repeatedly, with Eco being optimal, perhaps.

I am curious about others' experience with this. According to the manual, disabling traction control does not disable stability control or ABS. I was quite shocked by this experience and so glad that I discovered it under experimental conditions and not in traffic trying to go up a hill.

I do notice that the traction control keeps the car from "burning rubber" with fast starts from traffic lights much better than than on the eGolf and Volt. Therefore, I would say the trade-off is worth it if that is the case.

(As a note, I have been driving in winters in upstate NY, MA, and MN and not used snow tires since 1979, so please don't suggest that!)
 

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Without my going out to the garage and digging through my multiple hundred page manual, can you tell me where your traction control disabler/enabler is on your 2021 Kona EV? I have a 2022 Kona EV Select. I am in Spokane Washington and occasionally deal with modestly heavy snow and would welcome a little more traction control. Is it by chance on the lower dash to the left of the steering wheel?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Without my going out to the garage and digging through my multiple hundred page manual, can you tell me where your traction control disabler/enabler is on your 2021 Kona EV? I have a 2022 Kona EV Select. I am in Spokane Washington and occasionally deal with modestly heavy snow and would welcome a little more traction control. Is it by chance on the lower dash to the left of the steering wheel?
It is on by default, so you have to turn it off by pressing a button that is one of several down from the steering wheel on the left.
 

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20% of stabilization is always on, no matter what you do. On my 2018 1.6T AWD to get rid of traction control and stability control, you need to hold down the but for about 8-10 seconds until the text saying you are disabling them clears the screen. You still have 20% stability control that stays on. Sliding around in a snowy parking lot and with my car it has been lowered 2 inches and heavily modified suspension.

If I am pulling close to 1 gs in a 90 degree corner it hampers it a bit. Still good, but right at the end of the turn you get a stability control brake event that kills you shooting out of the pocket of the turn in a tight high load turn, say something with an "on camber" corner. This extreme control I doubt is on the N versions when you disable it.
 

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I have a short steep hill in my neighborhood to test my cars with snow covered roads (I live in Massachusetts). My 2010 Honda Insight, 2015 eGolf, and 2017 Chevy Volt (and other cars) did quite well on many different occasions using traction control.

However, the first time I tried my new 2021 Kona EV Ultimate under not the most difficult conditions, I got nowhere fast when the aggressive traction control stalled all momentum too quickly as I started the ascent and then I could not move forward. I tried Normal, Eco, and Eco+ modes all to no avail. I then disabled traction control and was able to get up fairly easily in all 3 modes repeatedly, with Eco being optimal, perhaps.

I am curious about others' experience with this. According to the manual, disabling traction control does not disable stability control or ABS. I was quite shocked by this experience and so glad that I discovered it under experimental conditions and not in traffic trying to go up a hill.

I do notice that the traction control keeps the car from "burning rubber" with fast starts from traffic lights much better than than on the eGolf and Volt. Therefore, I would say the trade-off is worth it if that is the case.

(As a note, I have been driving in winters in upstate NY, MA, and MN and not used snow tires since 1979, so please don't suggest that!)
Anytime I have encountered a situation where the tires might spin in snow, I have disabled the traction control on many of the cars I've owned- a CR-V, Civic, Accord, etc. I put Bridgestone Blizzaks on the Kona, so I have not experienced any situations where wheel slip would be an issue. I'm guessing that disabling traction control works with most cars.
 

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I have a short steep hill in my neighborhood to test my cars with snow covered roads (I live in Massachusetts). My 2010 Honda Insight, 2015 eGolf, and 2017 Chevy Volt (and other cars) did quite well on many different occasions using traction control.

However, the first time I tried my new 2021 Kona EV Ultimate under not the most difficult conditions, I got nowhere fast when the aggressive traction control stalled all momentum too quickly as I started the ascent and then I could not move forward. I tried Normal, Eco, and Eco+ modes all to no avail. I then disabled traction control and was able to get up fairly easily in all 3 modes repeatedly, with Eco being optimal, perhaps.

I am curious about others' experience with this. According to the manual, disabling traction control does not disable stability control or ABS. I was quite shocked by this experience and so glad that I discovered it under experimental conditions and not in traffic trying to go up a hill.

I do notice that the traction control keeps the car from "burning rubber" with fast starts from traffic lights much better than than on the eGolf and Volt. Therefore, I would say the trade-off is worth it if that is the case.

(As a note, I have been driving in winters in upstate NY, MA, and MN and not used snow tires since 1979, so please don't suggest that!)
Might be an issue with traction control subsystem. I haven't had any problems myself. But I know such things happen. I drive in snow once a month. On my monthly trip from Sacramento to Reno, NV
I'm at the point I let the CC and stearing assist handle most of the work. Both having proven themselves reliable.
22 Kona EV new in Aug 21
 

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Might be an issue with traction control subsystem. I haven't had any problems myself. But I know such things happen. I drive in snow once a month. On my monthly trip from Sacramento to Reno, NV
I'm at the point I let the CC and stearing assist handle most of the work. Both having proven themselves reliable.
22 Kona EV new in Aug 21
 

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I land with Richard&Cat ... I found a compact snow slope & started slowly up it with slight wheel spin & traction control (TC) on. I immediately turned TC off and there was no noticeable change. I tried same on flat and no noticeable change.
 

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I land with Richard&Cat ... I found a compact snow slope & started slowly up it with slight wheel spin & traction control (TC) on. I immediately turned TC off and there was no noticeable change. I tried same on flat and no noticeable change.
Sounds like software. Probably showup fast on a Hyundai scan tool
 

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I have a short steep hill in my neighborhood to test my cars with snow covered roads (I live in Massachusetts). My 2010 Honda Insight, 2015 eGolf, and 2017 Chevy Volt (and other cars) did quite well on many different occasions using traction control.

However, the first time I tried my new 2021 Kona EV Ultimate under not the most difficult conditions, I got nowhere fast when the aggressive traction control stalled all momentum too quickly as I started the ascent and then I could not move forward. I tried Normal, Eco, and Eco+ modes all to no avail. I then disabled traction control and was able to get up fairly easily in all 3 modes repeatedly, with Eco being optimal, perhaps.

I am curious about others' experience with this. According to the manual, disabling traction control does not disable stability control or ABS. I was quite shocked by this experience and so glad that I discovered it under experimental conditions and not in traffic trying to go up a hill.

I do notice that the traction control keeps the car from "burning rubber" with fast starts from traffic lights much better than than on the eGolf and Volt. Therefore, I would say the trade-off is worth it if that is the case.

(As a note, I have been driving in winters in upstate NY, MA, and MN and not used snow tires since 1979, so please don't suggest that!)
Do you have the OEM tires on it?...if your answer is yes, then it's time to go find better tires. The OEM ones are terrible and likely why you are seeing the difference between the other vehicles.

I live in Canada and have swapped the OEMs for Michelin CrossClimate 2 for 3 seasons and Michelin X-Ice 4 for Winter...I drove the car with the OEMs for 1 week before I decided they needed to go - and that was in September, with mild/dry weather.
 

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Do you have the OEM tires on it?...if your answer is yes, then it's time to go find better tires. The OEM ones are terrible and likely why you are seeing the difference between the other vehicles.

I live in Canada and have swapped the OEMs for Michelin CrossClimate 2 for 3 seasons and Michelin X-Ice 4 for Winter...I drove the car with the OEMs for 1 week before I decided they needed to go - and that was in September, with mild/dry weather.
(Sorry don't mean to change topics but I wasn't able to send a message to this poster)
Hello, I am a new owner of a 2022 Kona EV, and came across this post where you commented on switching to Michelin tires, both for summer and winter. My vehicle has the Nexen tires currently. I'm located in the Vancouver BC lower mainland area, so lots of rain, plus some snowy winter days in the mountains.



I'm researching what tires would be good choices to replace the factory ones. Can you comment your impressions of the tires you got, also any significant impact on range? I'm also curious if you have heard of anyone installing slightly wider tires - not sure if that is even possible?



Thanks in advance for any thoughts you can share.



Cheers,

Mark.
 
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