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2019 Hyundai Kona Electric
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I purchased a Hyundai Kona EV Limited on March 12, 2020 for $40,000. After 3 weeks, ~600 miles, the 100% charge range was only about 215 miles, well below the advertised range of 258 miles.
To be clear, this isn't about "driving style", I am saying when you fully charge at 100%, the range on the dash indicator is stated as 216 miles and that's about as far as you can go. When it was new ( a whopping 800 miles ago) it was at 260 miles of range. Is this typical for EVs. Do Tesla's and other EVs lose 16% of their "EPA" range in a few hundred miles.
Yes, I brought it to the Dealer and to Hyundai Motor America at the national support center. After nearly 2 weeks of looking at the car, everyone denies there is an issue - "the car is within specifications" I am told.
Anyone else experience this kind of degradation in range?
 

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2019 White Ultimate
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There's a billion things that can change your range

-Do you live in high altitude
-Do you have A/C on full blast
-Charging your phone / running a dash cam
-What tires you are using can affect efficiency in regeneration
-Are you using regeneration properly
-Is the area you live in windy or snowy etc
-Is it significantly hot in your area
 

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MY20 Hyundai Kona Highlander
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Here are some general comments. The range you’re talking about is from what EV drivers call the GOM (Guess-O-Meter). After a while you’ll get a feel for how to interpret the GOM. For instance, I’ve find it surprisingly accurate on long trips in the Kona, but I find it pretty useless if I’m doing shorter trips.

There may be an underlying problem but more likely it is the Hyundai mileage prediction algorithms: the way the computer (GOM) calculates range. The GOM algorithms used are quite sophisticated but are still guesses. The only accurate measure is what you get when you drive it. When I got my first Mitsubishi HEV 6 years ago I was like you, going back to dealer to complain about declining range, and getting fobbed off. But it turned out I was relying on the computer which was wildly inaccurate. My range was not declining, just the predicted range. I recall coming down a mountain & the GOM predicting a ridiculous range of 1000km at the bottom. Hyundai algorithms are remarkably better than the Mitsubishi ones, but still just guesses.
 

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I purchased a Hyundai Kona EV Limited on March 12, 2020 for $40,000. After 3 weeks, ~600 miles, the 100% charge range was only about 215 miles, well below the advertised range of 258 miles.
To be clear, this isn't about "driving style", I am saying when you fully charge at 100%, the range on the dash indicator is stated as 216 miles and that's about as far as you can go. When it was new ( a whopping 800 miles ago) it was at 260 miles of range. Is this typical for EVs. Do Tesla's and other EVs lose 16% of their "EPA" range in a few hundred miles.
Yes, I brought it to the Dealer and to Hyundai Motor America at the national support center. After nearly 2 weeks of looking at the car, everyone denies there is an issue - "the car is within specifications" I am told.
Anyone else experience this kind of degradation in range?
But it is about driving style, temperature, terrain and accessories being used. For instance: since there is no internal combustion engine to heat coolant/antifreeze to circulate thru your heater core for a fan to blow across when you turn on the heat, electric cars (and most hybrids) use an electric heater. That heater draws a lot of electricity. When driving next time turn the heat off and on a few times. The range of the car changes quickly and significantly.

The same happens when you turn on the Air Conditioning. It uses electricity (though generally less than the heater). If you try turning AC on then off, your range-o-meter will change.

If you need to turn both the heat and AC on at the same time in cold, humid conditions as the inside of your windshield as a layer of frost and you want to both melt it and remove the moisture so it does not fog anything, the range drops again.

If you live in a cold climate and put snow tires on, or decide you simply want different style tires that are not low rolling resistance rated, the range drops 6% to 10% as that extra grip means friction and more power burned.

If you live somewhere it gets cold (as it does on occasion here in upstate NY), that cold can reduce battery capacity and range. Not much, but it does. Then again gasoline formulae gets changed by refineries for cold weather. My internal combustion RAV4 gets 12% worse miles per gallon from the winter formula gasoline here. Most people do not notice it as there is nothing lit up on their dashboard showing the change in MPG.

If your tires are either under- or over-inflated, it will affect range.

Most of what I listed above happens on virtually every internal combustion engine car, too (with the exception of the heater). MPG goes down when accessories are used. The EPA ratings don't include accessories being on.

From what I understand of the range-o-meter, it displays a guess of the range based on your recent driving. If I spend the week doing city driving, it's not uncommon for me to get 275 miles of range. If I spend it traveling on highways, I will get 238 miles. Tomorrow I have a 224 mile round trip commute to a meeting. Spring is here, it will be around 55 degrees F outside. I won't use heat to AC and I will make the trip and get home with 20 miles of range left. I made the same trip a month ago, in 32 degree weather with the heat on, and needed to stop for 15 minutes to add some range on the way home.

There are many ways to effect range. Keep driving, keep checking this forum, the Kona Electric Facebook Group and keep learning. I was questioning whether I made the right choice to buy an electric car at about 600 miles, too. 10 months and 15,000 miles later, I cannot imagine switching back. I hope the EV experience gets to be less mystery and more predictable driving fun for you - it did for me.
 

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What I tend to watch is my efficiency of electron use. The car tracks the miles travelled per 1KwH. I do mostly highway driving, and I get on the average 3.6 miles per KWh.
If I do city driving, this tends to be more like 3.9
Cold weather, operating heater or the ac decreases what I get.
Cold winter temperature drastically lowers my range.
Whether you travel a flat terrain or going uphill also plays into it. Speed is a significant factor also.
It is highly unlikely that your battery suffered a significant decrease in capacity already. One of the monitoring solutions, such as Soul EvSpy can give some data
and raise a flag if the battery is indeed degrading. If you see that, you haved some basis talking to the dealer.

The published range number are based on an unrealistic (unrealistic) scenario

. .
 

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2020 Kona EV preferred trim, trailer hitch with wiring
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Now that it is winter, (0 or -1 celcius), I get about 300km on an 80% charge instead of over 400km. Amazing how much a little heating does to reduce range!
 

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It is not just the heater. It is the combined effect of less efficient battery chemistry, and the extra draw.
This is the dirty little secret of BEV-s.
 

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And it's Otty that has the heat pump! Range certainly is highly sensitive to temp, even in the mild 0-25°C range that I see here in NZ.
 

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Now that it is winter, (0 or -1 celcius), I get about 300km on an 80% charge instead of over 400km. Amazing how much a little heating does to reduce range!
I posted something here on another thread that has some info on performance at different temperatures of 4,200 electric vehicles over some 5 million trips (I think that’s what Coder is referring to re dirty secret of BEVs). Even though this relates primarily to electric vehicle fleets I think it provides a useful view the impact of temperature on performance (see summary graph below).

If you go to the original article they also have a range estimation tool for different EVs at different temperatures, including the Kona. I can’t validate it’s accuracy, but it’s probably better than nothing.

4914
 

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Thanks, that is a great graph. The bottom line: when someone decides on the range they need before purchasing a BEV, they need to consider this graph. A car with a smaller battery may end up being unusable in a cold climates, or during the coldest season. I am surprised at the similarly poor range at hot temperatures, I was not aware of that. I imagine in hot weather it is primarily running the AC? I think it is stupid that this is not discussed up front. Sooner or later every BEV owner figures this out, than there is bound to be some backlash at some point.

To put it bluntly: The Kona, which has a nominal range of 340 miles, actually has a worst case range of only a 120 miles. I think that is pretty astonishing, given the size and cost of the
propulsion battery.

There is another aspect: having a heat pump improves this graph significantly. I seem to recall it decreases the worst case cold temp "range loss" to 20-30% instead of 50%. I am pretty sure it improves the picture on the left side of the graph, and possibly on the right as well. Which IMO makes enough difference to make having a heat pump a compelling feature.
If I was aware if this I certainly would have considered that a "must have".

Is anybody as astonished by this as I am? Given the excessive range drop at temperature extremes, I feel BEV technology is a lot less mature than I thought it was.
I view this as the "great unsolved BEV problem".

Seems to me the way forward is making heat pumps standard equipment, and improving the insulation, heat reflection etc. ie. minimizing the impact of
exterior conditions on the car's interior by passive means, as much as possible. For example reflective, mirror-like paint comes to mind.
Seems to me we are combating the thermal energy leakage into, or out of the cabin using brute force. More finesse would be a better approach.
 

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Thanks, that is a great graph. The bottom line: when someone decides on the range they need before purchasing a BEV, they need to consider this graph. A car with a smaller battery may end up being unusable in a cold climates, or during the coldest season. I am surprised at the similarly poor range at hot temperatures, I was not aware of that. I imagine in hot weather it is primarily running the AC? I think it is stupid that this is not discussed up front. Sooner or later every BEV owner figures this out, than there is bound to be some backlash at some point.

To put it bluntly: The Kona, which has a nominal range of 340 miles, actually has a worst case range of only a 120 miles. I think that is pretty astonishing, given the size and cost of the
propulsion battery.

There is another aspect: having a heat pump improves this graph significantly. I seem to recall it decreases the worst case cold temp "range loss" to 20-30% instead of 50%. I am pretty sure it improves the picture on the left side of the graph, and possibly on the right as well. Which IMO makes enough difference to make having a heat pump a compelling feature.
If I was aware if this I certainly would have considered that a "must have".

Is anybody as astonished by this as I am? Given the excessive range drop at temperature extremes, I feel BEV technology is a lot less mature than I thought it was.
I view this as the "great unsolved BEV problem".

Seems to me the way forward is making heat pumps standard equipment, and improving the insulation, heat reflection etc. ie. minimizing the impact of
exterior conditions on the car's interior by passive means, as much as possible. For example reflective, mirror-like paint comes to mind.
Seems to me we are combating the thermal energy leakage into, or out of the cabin using brute force. More finesse would be a better approach.
To put it bluntly: The Kona, which has a nominal range of 340 miles, 340 MILES!!
 
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