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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all.

My wife bought a brand new 2021 Kona EV on Saturday and they contacted her on Wednesday for a battery recall. I took it in today (Friday) while she was at work, and now the car doesn't charge at all. This has royally screwed our plans away this weekend, which we have now had to cancel at extremely short notice.

We're understandably unhappy as the car was fine before the battery recall, so we're going to take it back to the dealer tomorrow and get them to rectify this issue. I was wondering if anyone else had seen a similar problem after the battery recall on their Kona please?
 

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Have you tried charging at a DC fast charger? I wonder if the onboard charger for AC charging is defective. DC fast chargers bypass the onboard charger and go directly to the battery.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Have you tried charging at a DC fast charger? I wonder if the onboard charger for AC charging is defective. DC fast chargers bypass the onboard charger and go directly to the battery.
We have, yes. We took it to two different DC fast chargers and it wouldn't charge. We are waiting for Hyundai to come get the car as it's got about three miles of range left and the dealer is waaaay further than that.
 

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Hi there, I have a Kona Electric 2019 that has been sitting in the dealership for 2 months with the same battery issue - worse still, Hyundai will not give an estimate of when the replacement battery is arriving but I have heard of folks waiting for 6 months or more until they tire of waiting and then sell the car back to Hyundai - at a loss usually. My advice to you? return the car to the dealership and get your money back - if you only purchased it a few days ago you should be able to do that legally. Especially as they contacted you only a few days after purchase to tell you of the recall - they must still be putting the faulty batteries in the electric cars which is incredibly unprofessional and a shabby way to treat customers.
 

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Do you get an error message? The software update helps detecting impending doom (a series of possible propulsion battery anomalies) and shuts the car down.
If it is the propulsion battery problem, the remedy is to replace it. Currently, this requires an approval from HMC, which itself may take weeks. As it is, HMC then orders the battery, and finally ships it to the dealer by boat. Then there is the question if the dealer has all the equipment needed to do the work... So the battery replacement process currently is far from a well-oiled machine.
Members on the forum report weeks to months of wait time, with varying degree of support from dealers (such as alternative transportation) . We heard of people getting rental reimbursement, which does not quite cover the actual rental cost, or actual free dealer provided loaner vehicles.

But from what you are saying, maybe your battery is OK, and you just have a garden variety charger failure,
which can be fixed by the dealer, and it is likely a much cheaper and easier repair. They may already have the needed part(s) in stock .


So the first line of inquiry is to determine if your propulsion battery is subject to recall #200 .
I thought all the 2021-s have a new SK design battery, which is supposed to be OK. AFAIK The recall info only implicated the 2019 and 2020 models.
You can check based on VIN here: Hyundai

Please let us know if this is the battery ort not.
 

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So when we say "Battery recall" there are several campaigns. Anything < #200 has to do with software updates, which are aimed at mitigating problems leading up to the battery fires.
(Better cell balancing, and better anomaly detection). They probably performed these. Recall #200 is the battery replacement. Based on what we know, your 20201 Kona should not need that.
What could have happened, when they re-flashed the software, maybe they made a mistake doing that and managed to corrupt the software. Could be as simple as re-installing the software.
 

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My car is a 2019 and needs a new lithium battery under the #200 recall - they could not do anything with the car because although it was partially charged when they got it the car did not drive, move or do anything and could not be charged at all. Believe me, nobody would be happier if this could be fixed by re-installing the software but the car is dead as a doornail after just 18 months of driving - I am now looking at buying a replacement vehicle and dumping this back with Hyundai as long as they pay off all the money I owe on it
 

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Suz, we know for sure in your case it was definitely recall #200, they had to do because of impending battery failure. .

What makes me question Stevespim-s case is that the 2021 models are not supposed to have the bad battery.
AFAIK in the 20201 model Konas they switched to SK.

So when he says "They did the battery recall", that could mean they have just performed the various software updates,
"just in case" despite the SK propulsion battery itself not having the problem the software updates try to mitigate.

One quick way to check, is to see if the dealer limited the charge level to less than 100%. although the definitive check is the
VIN check.
 

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Yep makes sense. I am fast needing to buy a new car - especially as I just got off the phone with Hyundai who said that new batteries are not coming anytime soon and that I should look at "other options" - I am reluctant to buy another Hyundai after this experience so am checking out other electric cars on the market.
 

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Hi Suz,

How far along are you in the process? Did they approve and order a battery for you? Did they provide some alternative transportation while your car is at the dealer?
Are they giving you a reason for the pessimistic outlook "not anytime soon"?

What are the other options available? Buyback at whatever is left payment wise ? In that case, all your payments you put in the car already, would be forfeit, right?

I shudder to think what will happen to all the cars they buy back, once the batteries are replaced. They will have to get rid of them at a fire sale, which will depress the resale/trade-in value of any of our Kona EV-s we still have. By the time they try to resell these, the Kona EV-s reputation will have had taken a substantial dive. This is not HMC-s finest hour.
 

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Yep they approved and ordered a battery for me - estimated delivery time unknown. Yes they gave me a loaner that I have to take back every 15 days for them to check. The pessimistic outlook was given to me by Hyundai customer care (or lack of it) when I called to ask what was going on. "Limited other options" - they said, so I asked about a buy back and they said someone would call me in 7-10 business days. I won't hold my breath waiting for that call. I would expect the buyback to be more than I owe otherwise I would just wait until the end of the contract to get reimbursed.
 

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Lemon law details vary state by state but I think you may be qualified. I recall the car must be in the shop for 30+ days, and in case of a severe defect, which I believe it is, there has to be one unsuccessful repair attempt by the dealer. I think The BMS recalls do qualify as such. One possible remedy is swapping the vehicle for a new one. I would give it some time, and pursue the lemon law angle if there is still no battery in sight. I would give it a couple of months.

I am not sure I understand what you meant by " otherwise I would just wait until the end of the contract to get reimbursed.".

I hear that both used and new car prices are way up, so you may lose some money if you take a buyback offer, then buy a new EV now. Simply because you may not get as good a deal as you did on your current Kona EV.
 

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Yep I already looked into the lemon laws - I live in one state and purchased in another and it is a no in both states - car has to be less than 18 months old and mine was 20 months old when taken into the dealership and have less than 18,000 miles on the clock - mine has 21.

I meant that I have almost 30 monthly payments left on this car and if I don't get a good offer to buy it back I will leave the car at the dealership until it is paid off and then get reimbursed by Hyundai.
 

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How does this work? I did not know Hyundai did anything like that.
Is there a rule, that for any month when you do not have use of the car, because it is at the dealer, you do not owe them the car payment?
I though it was more like: "too bad, tough luck for the owner" .

Will the dealer continue providing alternative transportation for 30 month? Esp. If you have an adversarial relationship at that point.
I imagine, in 30 month the battery will be surely replaced. Based on what we know ( the announced write-off in the 4th quarter) at one point they will
get going on mass battery replacements in earnest.
 

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Nope I am making every car payment - no car I can drive but I still need to make the payments legally.
When I spoke with Hyundai a few days ago they said that there were "no plans" for the batteries to come to the USA. when they print that they have "no remedy" for the battery replacement what else can it mean?

Not sure if the dealer with continue providing loaners but quite honestly I don't like driving gas cars anymore so am looking at a replacement gas car.
 

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Suz, in your case, they approved and ordered your new battery. already. So that specific battery, destined for your car will surely be shipped to the USA, it just may take a while.
I would not be surprised if they had to actually make the battery to fulfill that order. But I surely hope that those wheels are turning already, at least for you.
We know this happened for some customers already, right?

How can anybody at Hyundai say there is "no plans for the batteries come to the USA"?
Surely they do not mean your specific, already ordered battery..

"No remedy" in my mind just means that there are no proactive staging of batteries for those cars that still able to run, but are known to have a battery that will eventually need to be replaced.
My guess that mass replacements will start when the SK battery plants start producing batteries here in the USA.
 

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I hear you but in answer to your question - no, I do not know anyone who has had their car fault out and been unable to drive it have a replacement battery come through - one guy patiently waited for 6 months and still nothing until he gave up and had them buy it back.

David was told by Hyundai California that the #200 recall was just a way to get back the 2019 cars and they had no intention of replacing the batteries in them. And the SK battery plants are not scheduled to be built until next year - I called Hyundai in Alabama and they told me the batteries are not even manufactured in the US.
 

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So your read is that when HMC announced the recall in the media " Oh we want to do the right thing for our customers, and we will replace all these batteries" was just a media stunt?
That is BS?
 
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