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Hi all, I leased a 2020 Kona EV in March. I live very close to my place of employment and drive less than 100 miles per week most of the time, hence the lease. On Tuesday I went out to drive my car and it was dead. Had it flat bedded to the dealer and they told me my 12volt battery was dead and needed a charge. My reply was that my car was still pretty new and how could that battery be dead. They told me, “you don’t drive enough to keep the 12v battery charged.” Huh?! This has to be a design flaw right? Their suggestion was to get a trickle charger to make sure the 12v battery stays charged. Do they really expect me to remain a Hyundai customer at the point my lease is up? Does anyone have any better suggestions on how to deal with this issue?
 

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Have you tried putting the Aux Battery Saver into cycle mode? That will charge the 12V battery periodically, whether or not you drive the car. When it is operating you will see a light in the Hyundai badge on the front of the car.
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Hi all, I leased a 2020 Kona EV in March. I live very close to my place of employment and drive less than 100 miles per week most of the time, hence the lease. On Tuesday I went out to drive my car and it was dead. Had it flat bedded to the dealer and they told me my 12volt battery was dead and needed a charge. My reply was that my car was still pretty new and how could that battery be dead. They told me, “you don’t drive enough to keep the 12v battery charged.” Huh?! This has to be a design flaw right? Their suggestion was to get a trickle charger to make sure the 12v battery stays charged. Do they really expect me to remain a Hyundai customer at the point my lease is up? Does anyone have any better suggestions on how to deal with this issue?
I work from home and I also don't drive that much. I got a 2020 Kona EV SEL back in August of 2020. I came out to the car yesterday and literally nothing worked. Thankfully I parked it in the garage unlocked. It made it easier to take it on the flatbed to tow it to the dealership. When I parked it, the EV battery was charged at 38%. I'm flummoxed as to why this happened. I wonder if the 12V battery was dead. That would make sense, but I find it very weird that I didn't receive any type of warning about the 12V battery being low. After doing some research online, it looks like the EV battery can charge the 12V battery. I plugged into the normal charger overnight and still nothing changed and nothing changed.

It looks like it defaults to this. I'm not adding any help here, but want to see what more information that can be found out. I'll provide updates if I get any.

Sadly, Hyundai has no issue with me not having a car at all for 2 weeks while the dealership has time to diagnose the issue. I guess at least I will get my 10,000 steps in while I wait :/
 

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Hi all, I leased a 2020 Kona EV in March. I live very close to my place of employment and drive less than 100 miles per week most of the time, hence the lease. On Tuesday I went out to drive my car and it was dead. Had it flat bedded to the dealer and they told me my 12volt battery was dead and needed a charge. My reply was that my car was still pretty new and how could that battery be dead. They told me, “you don’t drive enough to keep the 12v battery charged.” Huh?! This has to be a design flaw right? Their suggestion was to get a trickle charger to make sure the 12v battery stays charged. Do they really expect me to remain a Hyundai customer at the point my lease is up? Does anyone have any better suggestions on how to deal with this issue?
I read an article about the Kona Ev that said if you leave the key in it, it will deplete the 12v battery, or if you leave it unlocked, it could also deplete the battery. Not sure if this helps. I have a 2021 Kona ev. I haven't had any issues yet with the 12v battery. I drive mine about 30 miles a day and charge it about once a week.
 

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Hi all, I leased a 2020 Kona EV in March. I live very close to my place of employment and drive less than 100 miles per week most of the time, hence the lease. On Tuesday I went out to drive my car and it was dead. Had it flat bedded to the dealer and they told me my 12volt battery was dead and needed a charge. My reply was that my car was still pretty new and how could that battery be dead. They told me, “you don’t drive enough to keep the 12v battery charged.” Huh?! This has to be a design flaw right? Their suggestion was to get a trickle charger to make sure the 12v battery stays charged. Do they really expect me to remain a Hyundai customer at the point my lease is up? Does anyone have any better suggestions on how to deal with this issue?
Possibly, I'm retired and don't drive much myself. I occasionally find the green light on the hood on. And on investigation it turns out that the 12v battery is being charged at this time. Along with communication with the mother ship over Korea. Nothing to worry about I'm told just diagnostic data and small upgrades for my 22 Kona. Like Tesla braggs about. It doesn't seem much power. And I've never had any problems with my 12v battery.
 

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I work from home and I also don't drive that much. I got a 2020 Kona EV SEL back in August of 2020. I came out to the car yesterday and literally nothing worked. Thankfully I parked it in the garage unlocked. It made it easier to take it on the flatbed to tow it to the dealership. When I parked it, the EV battery was charged at 38%. I'm flummoxed as to why this happened. I wonder if the 12V battery was dead. That would make sense, but I find it very weird that I didn't receive any type of warning about the 12V battery being low. After doing some research online, it looks like the EV battery can charge the 12V battery. I plugged into the normal charger overnight and still nothing changed and nothing changed.

It looks like it defaults to this. I'm not adding any help here, but want to see what more information that can be found out. I'll provide updates if I get any.

Sadly, Hyundai has no issue with me not having a car at all for 2 weeks while the dealership has time to diagnose the issue. I guess at least I will get my 10,000 steps in while I wait :/
* Update * I towed the car to my local dealer and apparently my 12v battery failed the load test. It must have been an isolated incident of a part failure. Car is working just fine now and I'm glad I got to learn some more about how the EV and 12v battery work together.
 

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Have you tried putting the Aux Battery Saver into cycle mode? That will charge the 12V battery periodically, whether or not you drive the car. When it is operating you will see a light in the Hyundai badge on the front of the car. View attachment 5684
This option no longer exists in the Kona EV, regardless of model year or trim. It was deleted some time ago (unless you have a KonaEV that has never been updated). The cycle mode is now the only mode available and is on by default and cannot be changed. This is A Good Thing.
 
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