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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi All

Now that the cold weather has pretty much settled with temperatures dropping to 2-3 C my question to you is, will you charge the battery to 100% or only to 80% please?
I welcome your comments below. :)
Thank you.

Regards
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
After reading about this issue on four Kona EV forums, I would say that unless range is an issue it would be best to charge to 80%.
Hi there and thanks for replying.
Yeah the range is quite an issue now since the temperatures have dipped to 2-3C, let's say that on average on a weekly basis I drive about 32-59 miles and the driving range/battery percentage dropped significantly, only get about 3-4 days driving from 80% to 30% before i charge the battery again back to 80%.
Yes I do play music on Spotify and warm up my seat and put the heating on now and then and I'm driving mostly in ECO Mode.
Any thoughts on this please?
Thank you.
 

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I don't live in a cold climate so perhaps I am not the best qualified to answer your question, but given you get 3 to 4 days driving between 80% and 30% and then recharge, if I were you I'd continue to charge to 80% and do the more frequent charges.

Can you charge daily? We are low mileage users and that's what we do - replace daily consumption with a daily recharge off the granny charger. Our house power is 240V like yours, and the granny charger is single phase 10 amp, charging at about 15km per hour so 10 hours overnight will replace 150km. If you have off-peak rates that you want to take advantage of then what I've suggested may not suit, but you get the idea.
 

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The cold affects the quantity of Ampères, going from 130 A to less than 50 A: the BMS does this; that means you will charge slowlier with a Fast (!), but if you use a AC (up to 11 KW) you will not notice any difference in charging; the problem borns if you try charging under -20° C; at -40° C the chemistry of the battery has troubles..

As usual 80% or 100% is function of the type of use you're doing.

Your battery will even be ~13% less efficient with cold in maintaining the energy ...and with heating on your consumption can decrease a lot; at 2° C consider -25% of range compared to 20° C driving.
 

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Hello all! New Kona EV limited driver. I have been checking some of the forums and haven't see anyone post this issue.
The range in the car shows different than on the myhundai app. Ex- the range currently in car shows 209 miles but when I go the app it shows 278 miles. I have a longer trip (120 miles or so) planned for tomorrow and want to know what I am in for here. Any one else experience this? Thanks!
 

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Hi All

Now that the cold weather has pretty much settled with temperatures dropping to 2-3 C my question to you is, will you charge the battery to 100% or only to 80% please?
I welcome your comments below. :)
Thank you.

Regards
It's definitely part of the EV learning curve. I just took a day trip to Lk Tahoe and while I did note a higher than average draw on the battery I noticed driving around Tahoe City that I could turn off the heater and let the battery heat the car quite satisfactorily in fact I had to lower the window a bit at 43f as it was getting too warm for my taste. I usually run the heat on automatic and when I notice the A/C light come on it's time to shut off the system and let the battery heat do the work
 

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OK, New Englander here. I've had my 2019 Kona EV for 2 years now. We've had some cold weather recently 23 F (-5 C) but here are the things I've noticed over that period. And by the way I always charge the battery to 100% now that I've had the recall done with the new batteries.
#1. I've never noticed any loss of battery charge as a result of cold weather when the car is not in use. In other words if I leave the car at night at 70% charge with say 200 miles left in range, in the morning it will have the same charge and miles remaining.
#2. Seat heaters don't seem to drain the charge much if any. When I turn on/off the seat heaters it doesn't affect the range.
#3. What severely affects the range is turning on the heat or air conditioner. More so the heat. In the summer, I've gotten range on full charge (100%) of up to 320 miles. It's increased since purchasing new probably as a result of driving style. If mostly city, lower speeds, your range will increase. As opposed to highway high speeds, range will decrease. This makes sense just from the added wind resistance. In the winter because of the heat, I find the range down more like 250-260 miles on 100% charge so that's a loss of 15% - 20% since that energy is being lost to heating the air in the car rather than moving the car forward.
#4. There are other drains of the battery such as rear window defroster, but not as severe as heating the car.
#5. If you can charge the car at home, in the morning if it's cold you can turn on the heat while the car is plugged in. That way it won't take away any of the driving range initially to heat up the car. However, that heat will drain away shortly and you'll have to turn on the heat at some point anyway.

I sure wish they included a heated steering wheel in the car!
 

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I recently bought a new 2022 Kona EV (SEL) after 4 years of driving a Chevy Bolt and being in the bullseye of their battery recall. Following along with developments in that recall pretty closely, I learned that deep discharges and, especially, full 100% charges can put considerable stress on these batteries (the Bolt uses virtually the same battery as the Kona.) Accordingly, I'm going to try to avoid deep discharges and to limit charges above 80% to situations where that's the only way to avoid a deep discharge.

I'll be interested to compare the effect of relatively cold weather on the Kona's battery ("relatively" cold because I live in California) to the effect that it has on Bolt batteries. Cold temperatures reduced my Bolt's range by about 20% even though I tried pretty hard to avoid using the battery to heat the car. (And yes, my Bolt's heated steering wheel definitely helped.) When I bought the Kona I decided to shell out the extra money for its "comfort and convenience" package largely in the hope that the battery would appreciate the battery warmer. Can someone tell me what, exactly, the battery warmer does and how that helps the battery? Hyundai referred me to my dealer's service department but they don't seem to know any more than I do.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I don't live in a cold climate so perhaps I am not the best qualified to answer your question, but given you get 3 to 4 days driving between 80% and 30% and then recharge, if I were you I'd continue to charge to 80% and do the more frequent charges.

Can you charge daily? We are low mileage users and that's what we do - replace daily consumption with a daily recharge off the granny charger. Our house power is 240V like yours, and the granny charger is single phase 10 amp, charging at about 15km per hour so 10 hours overnight will replace 150km. If you have off-peak rates that you want to take advantage of then what I've suggested may not suit, but you get the idea.
Hi

Thank you for your reply.
To summarise, yes I can use the granny charger to charge daily, however Hyundai says only to use the granny charger just as an emergency and not too often as it can impact your battery.
So I'm trying to avoid charging it with the granny cable to be honest with you.
Thank you.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
The cold affects the quantity of Ampères, going from 130 A to less than 50 A: the BMS does this; that means you will charge slowlier with a Fast (!), but if you use a AC (up to 11 KW) you will not notice any difference in charging; the problem borns if you try charging under -20° C; at -40° C the chemistry of the battery has troubles..

As usual 80% or 100% is function of the type of use you're doing.

Your battery will even be ~13% less efficient with cold in maintaining the energy ...and with heating on your consumption can decrease a lot; at 2° C consider -25% of range compared to 20° C driving.
Hi there

Thank you for your very helpful insight into this matter.
Indeed, since the temperatures plunged to 2-3 C I've noticed it does affect the range indeed.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
OK, New Englander here. I've had my 2019 Kona EV for 2 years now. We've had some cold weather recently 23 F (-5 C) but here are the things I've noticed over that period. And by the way I always charge the battery to 100% now that I've had the recall done with the new batteries.
#1. I've never noticed any loss of battery charge as a result of cold weather when the car is not in use. In other words if I leave the car at night at 70% charge with say 200 miles left in range, in the morning it will have the same charge and miles remaining.
#2. Seat heaters don't seem to drain the charge much if any. When I turn on/off the seat heaters it doesn't affect the range.
#3. What severely affects the range is turning on the heat or air conditioner. More so the heat. In the summer, I've gotten range on full charge (100%) of up to 320 miles. It's increased since purchasing new probably as a result of driving style. If mostly city, lower speeds, your range will increase. As opposed to highway high speeds, range will decrease. This makes sense just from the added wind resistance. In the winter because of the heat, I find the range down more like 250-260 miles on 100% charge so that's a loss of 15% - 20% since that energy is being lost to heating the air in the car rather than moving the car forward.
#4. There are other drains of the battery such as rear window defroster, but not as severe as heating the car.
#5. If you can charge the car at home, in the morning if it's cold you can turn on the heat while the car is plugged in. That way it won't take away any of the driving range initially to heat up the car. However, that heat will drain away shortly and you'll have to turn on the heat at some point anyway.

I sure wish they included a heated steering wheel in the car!

Hi

Thank you for your take on this.
I must say it is very accurate what you're saying, I've noticed on mine too if I use the heating option the battery drops quite a bit.
Saying this, I do have heated steering wheel in my car and it's lovely and toasty when I'm driving in cold weather.
 

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Hi

Thank you for your reply.
To summarise, yes I can use the granny charger to charge daily, however Hyundai says only to use the granny charger just as an emergency and not too often as it can impact your battery.
So I'm trying to avoid charging it with the granny cable to be honest with you.
Thank you.
You're welcome, but someone has given you incorrect information. Regular use of the granny charger CANNOT adversely affect your traction battery. In fact the low charge rate is better for it than the fast charge rates of level 2 or level 3 fast chargers.
 
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