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I have a 2020 Limited with the 1.6L GDI Turbo with just shy of 2500mi. I only do about 600-700 miles per month mostly short trips so this kind of seems directed at my driving habits. I checked my oil today and everything seems normal but I'll be keeping an eye on for sure going forward. I'm glad I found this forum for bringing things like this up and thanks to everyone for their inputs!
 

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Discussion Starter · #82 ·
January 29 my high pressure fuel pump was replaced for the 2nd time. For the weeks that followed the mechanics checked it weekly and it looked good until today - the fluids over the dip stick line was big!! They kept my vehicle and gave me a rental. Extremely frustrating!!
 

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Again, fuel dilution is a non issue if you change your oil every 3,000 to 3,500 miles. I have tested with two different oil labs and one being one of the better ones in the country, Polaris Labs. About six tests in 15,000 miles. It is just the nature of the beast, a small GDI turbo.

I am a worst case scenario user that has everything going against me, cold Minnesota winters, short tripping 10 miles to work and back. Plus, a very very heavy foot with being on boost more then most. I have zero abnormal wear. I gain 1/2 qt of fuel in my first 200 miles of new oil change, after that I gain another 1/4 qt. I change my oil at 3,000 miles in the winter and 3,500 in the summer. Really, don’t get all worried about this, it is a non issue, as many who actually test their oil by sending out to a oil analysis company, you soon find out you are worrying about a whole lot of nothing.
 

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January 29 my high pressure fuel pump was replaced for the 2nd time. For the weeks that followed the mechanics checked it weekly and it looked good until today - the fluids over the dip stick line was big!! They kept my vehicle and gave me a rental. Extremely frustrating!!
At least they are still working with you on the issue. They told me they could not detect any gas after I told them the fuel pump replacement did not work.
 

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@Mainia1 - after reading through the thread, it would seem my oil sample of 3.5% fuel is actually a bit better than most when it comes to Hyundai tGDIs.

I posted it over at BITOG, but I also have it attached here. Wanted to hear your thoughts since this was the only callout from Blackstone.
 

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Since you are in Texas, I would run 5w-40 or a thick 5w-30 year round. That means any 5w-30 Dexos1 Gen2 oil would be too thin. I myself would only run an oil with a HTHS (Hi-Temp Hi-Shear Viscosity @ 150 C) of a 3.5 or higher, as a bare minimum especially with your summer heat. I also look for a 11.8 or higher at 100C viscosity. I have to worry about -20 below here in Minnesota, so I have compromises, even though I can run a summer oil and winter oil if I want. I do like to try to run the same oil brands as to keep the additive packages close to the same, since you can run into problems when switching all around with different oils brands.

The Subaru WRX crowd has had good luck with Rotella T6 Multi Vehicle in stage 1 and stage 2 builds. So we know it performs well in high hp turbos. You have to watch out with switching out brands early and all over the place as the detergent add pack can screw around with your testing giving a false or legitimate high reading of wear metals. Then there is Mobil 1 5w-30 ESP that I use that is on the higher end of the 5-30 viscosity scale to more like a light 5-40, and has a lot of manufacture certifications. I like this because it gives me some weapons to use if they try to void my warranty because of oil. But then again, didn't you say Hyundai is not calling out ACEA A5/B5 in your 2019 Kona manual like they did in my 2018 Kona manual? That oil spec is not doing any favors for a highly used turbo motor. If so, that is nice because Hyundai WOULD try to use it against you/us if they could in a blown motor warranty claim. Getting rid of Hyundai sub-standard oil spec helps use buy better oil for our cars, even though I bought what I wanted to use knowing they speced a sub-standard mileage based oil spec. If some of you are looking for good oil, always use German oil specs from VW a a guide to getting quality designed oil. There are other German manufacture specs, but if you go by just VW you will be 100% fine and you have only one manufacture spec to go by to make it an easier choice. The Germans demand the best oils in their cars, while the Asian's could careless.
 

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But then again, didn't you say Hyundai is not calling out ACEA A5/B5 in your 2019 Kona manual like they did in my 2018 Kona manual? That oil spec is not doing any favors for a highly used turbo motor.
It says “API Latest (ILSAC Latest) or ACEA A5/B5*”

Footnote says “If ACEA A5 isn’t available in your country, you are able to use ILSAC GL-3 (or above) or ACEA A3 (or above.)”

When I read that, if you’re using SN+, GL-5, or ACEA A5/B5 you’re golden...
 

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2019 Kona 1.6T with 18,673 km - engine light came on after a very cold week (Toronto area), oil level very high, the dealer replaced the high pressure fuel pump. They recommended to go back after 1,000 km to do an oil change. This time the engine light was off but the oil lever was high again. The car is in service for over 3 weeks and they cannot find the issue. I'm driving a loaner from the dealer (a 2021 Kona 1.6T with 1,600 km). I was told that they have 2 more Kona 1.6T (one had the high pressure fuel pump replaced too) with the same issue.
FYI: I'm only driving the car for 5 km one way to work and, after the pump was replaced, I drove it in Sport mode for 1000Km.
 

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After almost 2 months of driving a loaner I finally got my Kona back. They replaced the O2 sensor.
The service manager recommended to check the oil level daily.
5363
 

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After almost 2 months of driving a loaner I finally got my Kona back. They replaced the O2 sensor.
The service manager recommended to check the oil le el daily.
View attachment 5363
But, now it is summer, so you cant tell if it worked for another 6 months. Please keep us informed on what you see, even 6-8 months out.
 

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New to this thread after lurking...

This is great...lots of interesting comments and conversation from ones that now appear banned. What a roller coaster !!

Here is my experience...

Brand new in Sept 20 Kona FWD 1.6t 7DCT. Currently at 13,500 miles of mostly highway driving.

When I first got the car I did check the oil level, but has always seemed high. Even at final inspection at the dealer. Didn't think too much about it.

First oil change around 4,500. Took it to the dealer. Wasn't super pleased with the answers I asked about full/semi synthetic, weights, etc. Oh well. I put it on the service request so there is a "record." The oil level at 4,500 was about 3/16" higher on the dipstick than at delivery. Got it changed with what the receipt says as 5w-20. I asked the service person to clarify and they walked away for a few minutes and came back and said, "...yeah, the mechanic said he put in 5w-30..." Well, they may have just gone to the bathroom or took a 5 minute break and came back and told me that. Either way, I don't know. It just wasn't a "warm and fuzzy" feeling with that answer.

Around 8,000 I started noticing that the oil level was over 1/4" higher than at the 4,500 oil change. It also smelled of gasoline. I freaked because I was about to go on a lengthy trip....and have read too many horror stories on this board. :) Anyway, I got it changed at one of local mechanics and they actually had NAPA filters and Castrol 5w30 Dexos gen2. I figured It was OK for what I needed...right now. (The dealer here reduced their hours for COVID and went back to their pre-COVID hours and their booking system is all screwed up. So...the dealer could not change the oil within a month of 8,000 miles.)

Now, I have 13,500 miles on the car and just did another oil change...myself this time. The oil level raised ever so slightly over this 4,500 mile oil, but no where near it did with the dealer oil change at 4,500. This has sold me on making sure I know what goes into that car. I'm kinda depressed as I do get "free" oil changes from the dealer for 100,000 miles...now I'm paying for them.

There is one major change I did to my driving "style" at the 8,000 mile change. I started to use Sport Mode exclusively. To be honest, if nothing else I prefer the Sport Mode throttle response to the "Eco" mode/non-sport mode. That alone is worth the other changes/benefits that come with it.

Before (factory oil and questionable dealer oil at 8,000) I just ran it in the default non-sport mode. It did everything I need. That is also when I noticed the most oil increase, especially with the questionable dealer oil change. Certainly not scientific.

Most of my driving is with cruise control on. 70mph Interstate (with a lot of hills), 35mps city for about 20% of total driving, lots of back country roads with 45mph speed limits.

Anyways...the point being is that in the default/non-sport mode, I never noticed how lazy the car was to downshift on hills. The turbo was probably going full-boil at 1900 to 2100 rpms. Starting with new oil at 8,000 miles, I put it in Sport Mode and would manually downshift using the Instantaneous MPG gauge as a replacement for a real vacuum/boost gauge. Under any sustained load like going up hills, when the Instantaneous Gauge would show less than 25 (half way bar graph), I would downshift. I figure a couple of hundred extra RPMs would allow the engine to breathe better and be able to handle the constant turbo boost limiting any pre-ignition as well as not flooding the cylinders with extra fuel to cool it down.

Now... on some roads I drive they are very flat and straight. I can get the engine to about 1,800 RPM's with no real load and the fuel mileage goes through the roof. I guess is you think about the amount of boost a turbo can deliver at at specific RPM, you can "trick" your engine into amazing things. One thing is that this car is a brick. The aerodynamics leave a lot to be desired. The turbo is on almost the entire time at 70mph. The engine is a bit too small for a long legged highway cruiser, but it still does that well. If I drive at 50-60mph on flat roads, I can get about 40mpg.

These are some of life's mysteries...does a known specific full synthetic oil make that much of a difference with GDI oil dilution? Does just upping the RPM's keep the oil dilution at bay? I dunno...all I know to do is change the oil every 4-5k miles with a full synthetic that has some flashy "GDI Engine Approved" on the label as well as keep the RPM's up when under load.

This is part of the vague point I'm making about keeping your RPM's up when you are on the turbo. Don't get me wrong, Hyundai made a great car. Easy foot-down-horn-on drivability right off the showroom floor. The "problem" with this is with regular 87 octane gas, GDI, and mid-grade oil you will eventually run into long term problems.

tl;dr-- Change your oil with a high quality synthetic. Don't let the engine "labor." Downshift when the gauge gets below 35 instantaneous.
 
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