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Hi. Anyone else having this issue? I only have 4000k and have had to get my oil changed twice in the last two weeks because it had over 1 litre of gas in the oil. They have replaced the throddle body and that didn't make a difference. They are ordering a fuel pump now. I am feeling I totally got a lemon and cannot imagine the damage it has already done to my vehicle.
 

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There will be some oil dilution with fuel as in all GDI engines.

However, who told you there was over a liter of gas in the oil? A lab would have to test the oil for fuel dilution to even begin to determine you had this much fuel in the oil. Dealers don't have this capability, nor do any businesses that specialize in oil services for that matter.

I smell a rat here! . Not you per se, just the circumstances as you are describing them.

Who replaced the throttle body?

What prompted you to get the oil changed before the normal service?

Was the Kona running badly?

We need to know the whole story not part of it, as there is obviously more to this.

Blessings and Peace
 

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Greeting and welcome

This thread could be very long, and not in a good way.

A liter is a LOT of gas! in the crankcase!!!

If the dealer really changed the throttle body and NOW wants to change the fuel pump. YOU NEED A NEW DEALER.

There aren't very many ways for a quart of gas to get in the crankcase in 2500 miles, rings not seating at all
an injector squirting gas full time.
 

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That’s insane... there must be a bad injector or something similar.. don’t see how a fuel pump is going to solve that issue..
Good luck... keep us updated..
 

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No offense to anyone including the OP but;

We're not going to find out until the OP explains the entire circumstances. The OP hasn't said, who did the oil changes or replaced the throttle body. I'm not going to assume anything. We collectively, aren't able to diagnosis anything, especially without hearing the entire story. Even then it's simply a shot in the dark. So right now, it's nothing but a hypothetical discussion.

Rings seat in the first 500 miles. Oil and fuel mix (are soluble) in the crankcase just as they would be if you mixed them in a jar. So there is no way for anyone, including the dealer to determine there was 1 liter of fuel in the oil. It must be analyzed by a lab, to determine the percentage of fuel dilution to oil, from oil in the crankcase. It won't be separated or unmixed with the oil in the crankcase. It would take more than two weeks to send off the oil sample and have it returned after the Lab analysis.

There is no mention of a compression check or anything else to determine a possible problem. Hyundai mechanics are specifically trained to tell the service rep exactly what they have checked, replaced of repaired, so it can be passed along to the owner. I'm not going to add or suggest anything towards this issue. Hopefully, the owner will provide a complete description of the entire circumstances.

So, until we know who and how they determined this. it's completely moot. This story and circumstance is simply, a wild goose chase at the moment. I can have empathy for anyone however, I'm choosing to wait for reasons of skepticism. I'd like to hear the whole explanation.

Blessings and Peace
 

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I have experienced this exact same problem - I had a regular oil change done in Oct 2018 - engine light went on end of January - shop told me the code was for misfire - replaced spark plugs. then told me that the oil was overfull - had complete oil change again , now engine light came on again (two weeks later) - dipped my oil - again it is overfull the car doesn't even have 7000 kms on it.
 

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Hi. Anyone else having this issue? I only have 4000k and have had to get my oil changed twice in the last two weeks because it had over 1 litre of gas in the oil. They have replaced the throddle body and that didn't make a difference. They are ordering a fuel pump now. I am feeling I totally got a lemon and cannot imagine the damage it has already done to my vehicle.
Well, a throttle body and a fuel pump wont fix this problem. There is no fuel in the throttle body. And there is no oil in the fuel pump., unless they are talking about the high pressure pump, in which case though the tappet is cam driven, there are 4 seals the oil would have to pass through before reaching the fuel diaphram, and to that end, its still enclosed and not even possible to mix there.

I recommend getting another dealership to look at it.
 

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A though just occurred to me; It might if oil/fuel is passing thru the roller tappet & o-ring that seals the high pressure pump.:plain: The high pressure fuel pump sets atop the camshaft housing.
So fuel might be leaking down thru the pump or oil being forced thru the injection system. I believe it might be the prior though.

However all this this is simply speculation. Either way, take it to another competent dealership, service department.

Beyond this, there is no way the dealership is able to tell that there is 1 liter of fuel in the oil.

Blessings and Peace
 

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There will be some oil dilution with fuel as in all GDI engines.

However, who told you there was over a liter of gas in the oil? A lab would have to test the oil for fuel dilution to even begin to determine you had this much fuel in the oil. Dealers don't have this capability, nor do any businesses that specialize in oil services for that matter.

I smell a rat here! . Not you per se, just the circumstances as you are describing them.

Who replaced the throttle body?

What prompted you to get the oil changed before the normal service?

Was the Kona running badly?

We need to know the whole story not part of it, as there is obviously more to this.

Blessings and Peace



I bet almost every 1.6T or 2.0T Hyundai motor if they are in 10 deg F and below and are doing some short tripping have 5% or above. I WAS above 5% for sure at 1,000 miles with no hope in sight. I am doing the testing at Polaris Labs. I would gain 1/2 Qt oil (fuel) in 500 miles. I never had bad wear metals reading because of fuel in the gas, but it has to be close.



JR Kona knows my story on partially fixing the problem. One BIG thing to do is run in sport mode all the time 100%of the time. You want your motor to be at 3,000 at 60 mph. You need to get the rpms out of the LSPI over rich fuel algorithm that Hyundai programed to help save the engine from LSPI detonation. If you are not in sport mode you are in a way overly rich zone from 1,500 to 2,500 Hyundai programed to run supper rich in these turbo motors. That should cut your fuel in the oil by a medium amount. Learn to go into manual mode to keep your rpms up higher in traffic too. Sorry but in winter you need to KICK gas mileage out the door, even worst then it already is with winter blends and over rich with cold starts.
 

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Yes sir and thanks for sharing. The rest, I agree with also.

The Kona is not a vehicle to be lugged around for very long, especially on constant short stop and go trips. Don't let the 1.6T idle for long periods in the cold either. You'll develop more fuel/oil dilution as a result. Kick that puppy in the arse, every chance you have on the open road. I'm not advocating speeding or driving unsafe. Just make sure you clean it out regularly with full throttle bursts to speed limits on the right roads and during the right conditions.

I'm suggesting you also run premium fuels with the 11:1 compression ratio the engine puts out. Higher temp combustion equals = less fuel waste to be recycled thru the PCV to re-burnt. The build up on the intake valves can be thwarted somewhat, if you don't baby the motor all the time. Also utilize either Chevron Techron or similar fuel additive at least ever 1000 miles. The engine will run better over the long haul.

Blessings and Peace
 

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Yes sir and thanks for sharing. The rest, I agree with also.

I'm suggesting you also run premium fuels with the 11:1 compression ratio the engine puts out. Higher temp combustion equals = less fuel waste to be recycled thru the PCV to re-burnt. The build up on the intake valves can be thwarted somewhat, if you don't baby the motor all the time. Also utilize either Chevron Techron or similar fuel additive at least ever 1000 miles. The engine will run better over the long haul.

Blessings and Peace
Hyundai suggests otherwise.. using premium is a waste since the car is designed and tuned for regular.. it does not take advantage of timing for higher octane fuels.. also adding fuel injector cleaner that often is totally unnecessary.. there’s plenty of detergents already in the fuel.. again.. according to Hyundai.. but what do they know ..
 

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:devil:
Hyundai suggests otherwise.. using premium is a waste since the car is designed and tuned for regular.. it does not take advantage of timing for higher octane fuels.. also adding fuel injector cleaner that often is totally unnecessary.. there’s plenty of detergents already in the fuel.. again.. according to Hyundai.. but what do they know ..

Within the first week of owning my Kona I noticed detonation or pinging with regular 87 octane. Going to mid grade helped, but I still can hear it every so often with mid grade. I even hear it ever so rarely with 93 octane premium. While JRKona says the Kona has 11:1, compression ratio I thought it had 10.5 :1. So I Googled it and Hyundai USA says it is 10:1

https://www.hyundainews.com/models/hyundai-kona-2018-kona/specifications.

That said, with 18 lbs of boost at 1700 rpm and LSPI too boot, 87 octane WILL send the computer to reduce the timing IF the computer as that algorithm. That is the question. Did the Hyundai engineers "lock down" the timing to 87 octane????? In the summer I myself can't run 87 octane, I have too much damaging detonation to risk the damage it can cause. I can squeak by with 89 octane.....but then I hear some slight detonation here and there. So if I am in the summer and I know I will be beating on it, I run 92/93 octane. When gas is cheaper I will also opt for 92/93 since I am on it quite a bit. :devil:

I am on the side of using added detergents every so often even though my car only gets Top Tier gas . I will roll the dice that using Redline SI-1 will help any over the top carboned up "in cylinder GDI injectors" that are well known for the adverse conditions inside the cylinder and their carbon caking and spray pattern alterations with time and mileage. Add the lubrication that the Redline gives the injector. It is known gasoline is not the most lubricating fluid. There are people who add 4 oz of ashless 2-stroke oil per tankfull to get some of that lubrication effect. The jury is still out on that one. Then add "valve overlap"fuel/air mixture that can backfeed into the intake. This is still said to be a case even in a GDI engine, but has been reduced in later years and that COULD be the case for GDI engines going longer without needing a walnut blasting. I myself will be running a bottle of Redline SI-1 every 10,000 miles. It can also be said adding PEA based additional injector cleaners can help some cleaning or breaking up of a ever so slight of upper ring land carbon.



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I’ve tried premium for a few tanks.. and noticed no difference.. I have no audible ping or hesitation, etc...
Did not “feel” any difference in performance either.. ?
Redline fuel cleaner is detergent based.. no issues in using it often.. Other fuel cleaners are solvent based and
Using it too often is hard on seals and diaphragms.. but not necessary every 1K miles or ten times that...
I’m still going by Hyundai’s recommendedation that it’s not necessary.. there are also several precautions on
Using fuel additives as well in the manual.. that and the fact we had a 2012 Kia sorrento GDI with over 100K
Miles that never used any additives with zero issues.
If the car took advantage of premium like the Genesis line does, That’s all I would be using... but that’s not the case..
Maybe if my engine gets carboned up to create a higher CR, I’ll need to use premium.. lol.. hope that’s not the case..
I drive my car hard, but don’t abuse it.. I usually follow the manuals recommendations.. except with oil changes since it’s GDI.. I change the oil more frequently than the book recommends.. that holds true for all fluids..
I’m way less anal then I used to be.. more about enjoying the car now then worrying about it lasting.. At my age, I worry more about me lasting...
Good discussion Mainia1 !

:devil:


Within the first week of owning my Kona I noticed detonation or pinging with regular 87 octane. Going to mid grade helped, but I still can hear it every so often with mid grade. I even hear it ever so rarely with 93 octane premium. While JRKona says the Kona has 11:1, compression ratio I thought it had 10.5 :1. So I Googled it and Hyundai USA says it is 10:1

https://www.hyundainews.com/models/hyundai-kona-2018-kona/specifications.

That said, with 18 lbs of boost at 1700 rpm and LSPI too boot, 87 octane WILL send the computer to reduce the timing IF the computer as that algorithm. That is the question. Did the Hyundai engineers "lock down" the timing to 87 octane????? In the summer I myself can't run 87 octane, I have too much damaging detonation to risk the damage it can cause. I can squeak by with 89 octane.....but then I hear some slight detonation here and there. So if I am in the summer and I know I will be beating on it, I run 92/93 octane. When gas is cheaper I will also opt for 92/93 since I am on it quite a bit. :devil:

I am on the side of using added detergents every so often even though my car only gets Top Tier gas . I will roll the dice that using Redline SI-1 will help any over the top carboned up "in cylinder GDI injectors" that are well known for the adverse conditions inside the cylinder and their carbon caking and spray pattern alterations with time and mileage. Add the lubrication that the Redline gives the injector. It is known gasoline is not the most lubricating fluid. There are people who add 4 oz of ashless 2-stroke oil per tankfull to get some of that lubrication effect. The jury is still out on that one. Then add "valve overlap"fuel/air mixture that can backfeed into the intake. This is still said to be a case even in a GDI engine, but has been reduced in later years and that COULD be the case for GDI engines going longer without needing a walnut blasting. I myself will be running a bottle of Redline SI-1 every 10,000 miles. It can also be said adding PEA based additional injector cleaners can help some cleaning or breaking up of a ever so slight of upper ring land carbon.



.
 

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>GDI engine
>replace throttle body for gas in oil issue


wat?

fire your mechanic.
I can come up with only 1 reason they replaced the throttle body. I think they figured the TB was giving a bad signal, as the throttle position sensor is built into the electronics on it. IF the TB was thinking it was at, say Wide Open Throttle (WOT), then the engine would dump excess fuel into the engine, possibly to the point of blowing past the rings, or the valve stem seals. But, you could see its effect not just in the oil. You would get fouling of the plugs, oxygen sensor codes, low mileage, horrible fuel trims.
 

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I can come up with only 1 reason they replaced the throttle body. I think they figured the TB was giving a bad signal, as the throttle position sensor is built into the electronics on it. IF the TB was thinking it was at, say Wide Open Throttle (WOT), then the engine would dump excess fuel into the engine, possibly to the point of blowing past the rings, or the valve stem seals. But, you could see its effect not just in the oil. You would get fouling of the plugs, oxygen sensor codes, low mileage, horrible fuel trims.
Ahh, I could see how that could be a culprit, but you can't just replace the sensor?
 

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Ahh, I could see how that could be a culprit, but you can't just replace the sensor?

The sensor is intergrated into the throttle body, it would be cheaper to replace the throttle body as a whole.
 

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No motor mind, but if your engine is pinging, it has issues ! OEM somehow is messed up, sensor, computer, program, something ! Dealership needs to fix it, not your idea of higher octane and injector cleaner; to me this just gives them more reason to void a warranty issue down the road. Not arguing your points and facts, but it is not the fix, has to be control system of fuel. Ping to me is excessive fuel ? If so, it is a problem. Best of luck.
 

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I think I might have the same issue. At first I thought it might be the recent extreme cold. I changed oil a week ago and purposely filled oil to 1/4" below full. Less than a week, the oil level is at full line. My minimum drives are 30+ min on freeway. Using sport mode didn't help.

I'll take it in sometime this week.
 

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No motor mind, but if your engine is pinging, it has issues ! OEM somehow is messed up, sensor, computer, program, something ! Dealership needs to fix it, not your idea of higher octane and injector cleaner; to me this just gives them more reason to void a warranty issue down the road. Not arguing your points and facts, but it is not the fix, has to be control system of fuel. Ping to me is excessive fuel ? If so, it is a problem. Best of luck.

I will assume this post was directed at me, I do have to add my detonation is not 100% of the time with 87 octane, on full boost WFO runs I would get it 10% of the time. I grew up in a street racer group of guys building race motor/street cars, we would set timing to our detonation or lack of. Then on autocross days we would get AV gas and tune to that and then back down again on low octane pump gas.

The average person is not going to hear what I am hearing. I have the ability to hear stuff like that. I had a buddy of mine who I grew up with that was in our car group and he can hear slight detonation too, my wife hears nothing. I like the fact I am able to kill the detonation with 93 octane because I know I am at a max timing spot for the motor. If you never hear detonation with 87 octane with this motor's compression ratio and high boost at 1,700 rpm you are detuned in my opinion.

Every ECU and sensors has a plus or minus spread in it's algorithm and sensor voltage that is send back to the ECU. I take this as mine is happily on the plus side.



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