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2020 Kona Limited, Lime Twist
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Bought my 2020 Limited in May and took it in for the dealer complimentary oil change at about 1500 miles. This is not the Hyundai free maintenance oil change, but a free oil change my dealer offered with every car. I like to change the oil in new engines after in initial break-in of 1-2K miles so used the free change. The problem is I specifically asked the dealer what oil they used and my service guy said 5W20 synthetic blend bulk oil. I didn't think this was correct and after looking at the manual it's not, the 1.6T should have 5W30 or higher multi-viscosities up from that depending on ambient operating temps.

Anyone else ask the dealer what oil they are using on their 1.6T?
 

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The correct oil should be 5W30. What the guy said and what was put in can be different. Unless the guy actually saw the oil that was put in. I'll keep on changing my own oil till I'm not able to anymore.
 

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Yeah I agree. He might have told me 5W20 and they actually put 5W30 in, but at this point even if they said different I couldn't believe them. So I wrote Hyundai USA an email with a scan of the service record (that only says bulk oil not the weight) and asked them if they could provide another oil change at a closer dealer (the dealer I bought from was 60 miles away because they had the model/color I wanted). If they don't I'll change it myself to full syn 5W30 same as my F450 uses.
 

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I've had a dealer change my oil once. They put "5w40" on record and "synthetic" as I requested as well. Since then I have done my own oil change. 3000 miles after that oil change, I drained it to put Castrol edge 5w30. That dealership oil after 3000 miles was black... I'm very sure I was ripped off for conventional, and therefore will be putting my own oil in for the rest of this car's lifetime

I do believe every dealer uses different oils though, the Illinois dealers seem to carry Valvoline.
 

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I find it hard to believe any Hyundai dealer would have 5w-40 oil, let alone be willing to even lift a finger for a customer to order some. I bet you had some form of semi-syn 5w-30 or heaven forbid semi-syn 5w-20. With a turbo car, unless the dealership is a German car manufacture dealership, I would NEVER trust any other brands dealership that you are getting "good high end oil" unless you watch them with your own eyes put in good oil you brought for them to put in. Doing it yourself just makes sense if you own a turbo car.

For others looking for someone to change your oil in your turbo car, go to a privateer German import repair shop and bring a filter for your Hyundai and ask to have them put in VW/MB (Mercedes Benz ) spec oil and call it a day. They always stock good quality oil there and they most likely will not lie and screw you over with cheap oil.
 

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I find it hard to believe any Hyundai dealer would have 5w-40 oil, let alone be willing to even lift a finger for a customer to order some. I bet you had some form of semi-syn 5w-30 or heaven forbid semi-syn 5w-20. With a turbo car, unless the dealership is a German car manufacture dealership, I would NEVER trust any other brands dealership that you are getting "good high end oil" unless you watch them with your own eyes put in good oil you brought for them to put in. Doing it yourself just makes sense if you own a turbo car.

For others looking for someone to change your oil in your turbo car, go to a privateer German import repair shop and bring a filter for your Hyundai and ask to have them put in VW/MB (Mercedes Benz ) spec oil and call it a day. They always stock good quality oil there and they most likely will not lie and screw you over with cheap oil.
having my oil changed at the dealer currently every 3k miles.. It’s a Hyundai .. not some exotic high dollar one of a kind masterpiece... the way most of these cars are driven, any oil would do.. changing it often is more important due to fuel contamination then worrying about shear strength, etc..
if you run it hard often , then I would consider going to a more robust oil.. but for most..
just follow the manual And use oil that meets the requirements..
my dealer offers a lifetime warranty and gave me 9 free oil changes.. im enjoying not being anal about this car... it’s a first for me..
 

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having my oil changed at the dealer currently every 3k miles.. It’s a Hyundai .. not some exotic high dollar one of a kind masterpiece... the way most of these cars are driven, any oil would do.. changing it often is more important due to fuel contamination then worrying about shear strength, etc..
if you run it hard often , then I would consider going to a more robust oil.. but for most..
just follow the manual And use oil that meets the requirements..
my dealer offers a lifetime warranty and gave me 9 free oil changes.. im enjoying not being anal about this car... it’s a first for me..
While I agree modern automotive oils are great these days, and for the average driver anything is fine. And ANY name brand oil will work on a non-turbo car, with a "maybe " an exception of a Hyundai non-turbo car because of my hypothesis below. Hyundai engines are not even close to being in the league of a Honda or a Toyota engines ( minus Toyota's slugging issues and head bolts).

My comment was based off of Justatrees post and I know he has lowering springs, exhaust and who knows if he has a piggyback and doesn't want it know for warranty reasons. So he thrashes his car I would think. Hyundai's are hard on oil, if you are hard on your Hyundai. We happen to have one of Hyundai's better motors, but Hyundai's as a whole uses questionable metallurgy in my opinion, even in our engines. We just happen to have better geometry in our engine that the badly chosen metallurgy doesn't show it head as much.

To save keyboard time I will copy and paste a post I posted at Bob's The Oil Guy site. This is my opinion from quit a bit of research, but still an opinion. Hyundai's are far lesser, of the BMW's you are use to. So for some, oil quality choice does matter. It matters so much, ALL the German auto makers (even VW) mandate quality oil with high grade certifications of quality and additives even for their engines that 98% are "Grandpa drivers".



My opinion is the problem with Hyundai/Kia is bad metallurgy choice, and going 100% all into "The Korean Way" = "Put your head in the sand, and keep plugging along, all while doing nothing to change or find the problem".

The worst of all engines is the 2.0 and 2.4, The Theta 2. . Another model engine was the "Nu", the 1.8 and 2.0 liter motor that had/have this issue of destroying itself too. The 1.6 and 1.6T Gamma motor is one of their better motors. A 10 year Hyundai mechanic said "If you don't see a side of a piston skirt in the oil pan by 6,000 miles, you wont have a problem with the 1.6 and 1,6T motor." (with the exception of weak connecting rods in the 2013/14 Veloster Turbo that has been over/badly tuned...BOOM!).

The Global Engine Alliance was a joint venture between Chrysler, Mitsubishi Motors, and the Hyundai Motor Company for developing a line of shared 4-cylinder engines. The initial design of the engine block and cylinder head was handled by Hyundai. However, each manufacturer configured their variants of the initial design differently based on their needs. In 2009, Chrysler bought out Mitsubishi and Hyundai's stake in the joint-venture; however, each company retained rights to build the engines.

It was said by Hyundai, that they had an issue with leaving crankshaft machining metal scraps in the oil passageways for 2-3 years on the 2.0 and 2.4 liter motors. Well how does this correlate into 9 years of what appears to be bad piston metallurgy and bad crank and rod bearing metallurgy choice. Chrysler and Mitsubishi used their choice of piston, crank, and bearing metallurgy, along with their choice of oil pump design AFTER the disbandment of the engine alliance in 2009. After 10 + years of Hyundai/Kia beating it's head against the wall, and nothing changed with their horrendous choice of metallurgy, all coming from a world wide behemoth of a metals company. "The Irony". These 10+ years I have not heard of the other manufactures engines destroying themselves like Hyundai's have.


It has been said 14% to 16% of all Hyundai/Kia motors will destroy themselves, early in life, sometimes as many as three times in one car. Many with Hyundai OEM oil filters on them, since many privater shops will use Hyundai OEM filters to protect themselves. I don't think it is the filter. Too many live a long life with every different filter known to man.

My wife had a 2013 Elantra GT 1.8 where at 14,000 miles, and a life of 3,000 miles oil changes ( short tripper 3 miles to work) of SuperTech full synthetic and Mobil 1. The motor destroyed itself with scuffed and brutally galled piston skirts where the metal went into the lifters from oil filter bypass startups and took the lifters out and gave it the CLASSIC "Hyundai Tick of Death".


One of the key problems a Hyundai/Kia CAN be born with.

Galling - Wikipedia


I now use the Fram Titanium filter because I question if the tiny holes in the Fram TG/XG that COULD create foam vs the larger easy flowing holes in the base plate of the new Titanium. Again just a hunch that I am going to go with as a Hail Mary opinion of hope. Ha Ha.


My hypothesis is, it is not the filter or the machining chips, I think it is metallurgy used in engine part choice. That's from my research into the matter, just my opinion.
 

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Over thirty years ago, one of the premier driving schools did a test with their race cars driven by students. On half of the stable they did normal oil and filter changes every 2,000 mi. In the other half, they only changed oil filters and add oil as needed. After about 100,000 mi of running, and after they had received new cars. They tore down the old engines and found no appreciable difference in wear between the two sets of motors! And this was with a quality conventional motor oil, not synthetic. Go figure! Personally, since Hyundai offers such a great warranty on their engine and drive lines, I seriously doubt they’d use anything that would contribute to motor failure.
 

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Over thirty years ago, one of the premier driving schools did a test with their race cars driven by students. On half of the stable they did normal oil and filter changes every 2,000 mi. In the other half, they only changed oil filters and add oil as needed. After about 100,000 mi of running, and after they had received new cars. They tore down the old engines and found no appreciable difference in wear between the two sets of motors! And this was with a quality conventional motor oil, not synthetic. Go figure! Personally, since Hyundai offers such a great warranty on their engine and drive lines, I seriously doubt they’d use anything that would contribute to motor failure.
You are talking Hyundai here. Their 1/2 billion dollar+ ??? 10 year engine metallurgy issue is very much contributing to massive engine failures across multiple of their engine models. One Hyundai mechanic said his dealership had 250 cars waiting for engines that their sister "other branded" dealerships had Hyundai and Kia's in a couple of bays getting engines swapped out. My small dealer had 50 cars waiting for engines when mine killed itself. This happened for more then 2 years straight. Many cars had two to three motors, and they still have the issue that they seem to refuse to fix. Many people a baffled on why they wouldn't figure it out when clearly Mitsubishi and Chrysler did not even have a fraction of the issue with that same motor design with THEIR metallurgy choice. In 10 years of this, it has to be some form of money laundering scheme to Swiss bank accounts for the higher ups at Hyundai World Brands. All they would have to is reformulate their metal as Mitsubishi and Chrysler did and they would solve 90% of their 10 year engine failure issues. They could buy their pistons from Mahle or send 50 crate engines from each model engine that kills itself to Mahle Engineering Services and figure out the problem in 6 months. They chose not to. Just more of their "Head in the sand", keep plugging along doing the same thing without fixing anything.



We still have to assume the new Theta 3 motor will have these same issues with their track record on engines . They have to keep the money flowing to the Swiss bank accounts.14 % to 16% of Hyundai engines fail because of these engine design issues. They have even increased oil pressure over what some engines have to no avail. Maybe buy engines that Hyundai designed from Mitsubishi so they can get it right.

Your view of Hyundai's great warranty is through the eye of their marketing dept. Hyundai is notorious for denying warranties. Good luck with conventional oil with a turbo in a race car. That won't work the best in today's turbo race cars. You would have coking, varnishing and gelling of the oil. Even with modern high quality oil turbo rebuilders and manufactures get low mileage water cooler turbos back from car guys that should know better with cool down times that have taken out seals from bad coking. Let alone car dealerships with lead foot men and women that take out their turbos from lead footing to the where ever and then shutting down HOT in their closed garage. I would not want my wife to own a turbo car. Quality synthetic gives a wider spread from heat damage that a turbo car can do to the oil in an adverse scenario for a turbo car.
 
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