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Discussion Starter #2 (Edited)
Added note: Valvoline chose not to "certify" their oil because of cost, JUST as Redline and Amsoil has chosen to do the same, not certify, while exceeding the certified minimums.





Flack from the oil wars: Tom Read, a spokesperson for GM's powertrain technology group, warns that using an alternative oil might diminish performance.
"If a customer uses a non-licensed engine oil that is simply ILSAC GF-5 quality, they will not enjoy the benefits of using a Dexos-licensed product," Read says. Those benefits could include better low-temperature performance, cleaner pistons and better aeration performance, he says. "This could be especially important as the engine oil ages."
Read's case for Dexos sounds compelling, but Valvoline's Smith isn't buying it.
"Our SynPower 5W-20, 5W-30 and DuraBlend 5W-30 went through all the Dexos testing and passed all the requirements," Smith says. "But we felt that carrying the Dexos name was not providing the consumer with any value."
Rather than raise the price of its oil to offset the cost of licensing the Dexos name, Valvoline chose to forgo the license and keep the prices lower, he says.
Smith says that GM's engine-performance warnings are part of its goal to drive consumers to dealerships for their maintenance. "We feel that they are taking choice away from the consumer," he says.
Focus on the Oil Basics
Setting aside the claims and counter-claims of manufacturer-specified oil superiority, here's all you have to remember: As long as you follow the oil specifications shown in your owner's manual, you have nothing to worry about.
In the event that the dealership tries to void your warranty over the use of non-manufacturer oil, know that the Magnuson-Moss Warranty Act will protect you. If your vehicle doesn't have an oil specification, you have more flexibility in choosing your product. Finally, make sure you know the proper viscosity for your car and change the oil at the proper interval.

Added Added Note: I read somewhere that Valvoline now certifies those oils and is charging you more for that cert.
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Discussion Starter #3
While I stated this is some of it's form above, I thought I would add this from another forum, since typing time and another opinion can be useful when hashing over oil choice and warranty manipulation by dealers and manufactures.




If you live in the USA you have the Magnuson-Moss Warranty Act that gives you protection from the manufacture abuse, and in almost all cases, dealer abuse (since some don't know the law). Some try to pack crap up you rear end , but the minute you bring up your rights with the Magnusen-Moss Warranty Act they back right back down with their rhetoric game. Some don't even know there are laws protecting the car buyer.

First you most likely have oil viscosity options. Like in my 2018 Hyundai Kona turbo, 5-30 is spec and 5-40 is an option if no 5-30 is available. Sorry Hyundai 5-40 is a far better oil viscosity for a steaming hot turbo then 5-30 and they know it. Most of the time the key word is "recommended" and not "must use". I live in Minnesota and we see 30 below from time to time, I will be running 0-40 in the summer and 0-30 in the winter. In a turbo GDI with fuel dilution issues, and my rough service use, I want a 40 weight oil that will HOLD the spec of the 30 weight when it is sheared down from use and fuel dilution. I myself will never run a 0-20 or 5-20 oil. Now they are pushing 0-16 and 5-16 oil. Sorry you can take your CAFE standard water oil and stick it ..... I want some oil that can hold a oil film boundary layer when pushing the motor in high rpms or severe heat. I don't care about the manufacture 's mandate for CAFE mileage figures. You see these same cars ( high performance ) use 5-40 and 5-50 in Europe and other countries because they still think they need to use the "proper" weight oil for the use case, and not to meet some government CAFE standard BS figure. But even they are getting bully wipped into following their form of CAFE standard at the determent of the engine.

As far as the manufacture, most if not all they look for is if you have oil in the car and not red ATF or gear oil in your engine crankcase. Or engine oil in your gearbox, ATF in your CVT trans. Example: I have a relatives in both the largest Audi dealer and the largest Lexus dealer in Minnesota. Both have never taken and oil anaysis of any blown up engine for the last 10 years both have been working at prospective places. All they check for is proper oil for the proper location, No red oil in the engine oil ( ATF) and they smell for gear(hypoid) oil in the engine, other wise the warranty goes through as it should.

I have talked to both Amsoil and Redline about this and they get a couple "dealers" who strong arm customers and deny warranty on oil and say it was "the oil" that caused the problem. Never the manufacture.....WHY, because the manufacture KNOWS about the Magnusen-Moss Warranty Act and knows the customer has rights and there for doesn't, in almost all cases (in the USA) try to screw the customer with a sweeping generality of denying warranty on falsehoods. Now a days the oil is so far superior even in cheap name brand dino oils that oil is really never an oil issue. It's a design and manufacturing issue. Because part of the law is the dealer or manufacture has to PROVE the failure, YOU done have to prove anything. Other them is a rogue dealer who is clueless to the law tries to push you around, you just have to push back.


Example: I owned a 2013 Elantra GT 1.8 liter. I use Fram's best oil filter, the Fram Ultra, a completely different filter design from the other cheap junk Fram makes and that has the bad rap. The Fram Ultra high quality fully synthetic filter, that is in the top 5 best oil filters made.

I brought my car in at 14,000 miles with the Hyundai tick of death, they told me 2 separate times this is normal. They said I SHOULD use Hyundai oil filters, they found that other aftermarket brands can exacerbate this problem. They pulled the Ultra and put their OEM "swiss cheese" filter on and still the same loud ticking noise. Still, I get this is normal. Being I have had years of engine building and owned a hobby Audi repair shop I know that this is not a normal sounding engine. On the third time in with this sound I said "here are the keys and I don't want the car back until you fix the problem, this is not "normal". 4 hours later, I get a phone call saying I will be getting a new engine. So just because they tell you it is so, doesn't mean it is so.

Added note: Fram saw an issue with Hyundai motors and their filters so about 5 to 8 years ago they redesigned their filter that are speced to the Hyundai's to match or exceed flow and increased the can thickness to compensate for Hyundai's higher oil pressure they use to "compensate" for badly designed engines they have been known for. So I have zero issue using a Fram Ultra on my Hyundai's. In fact I bought my Hyundai Kona Turbo with 16 miles on it and I went directly home and took off the swiss cheese OEM filter and spun on a Fram Ultra at 32 miles on the engine. Any issue Hyundai.... I have Fram's R&D engineers and all their month long documentation this Fram Ultra exceeds Hyundai's own crap swiss cheese filter and my Fram filters my oil to far better degree then the OEM. No warranty issue because the Magnusen-Moss Warranty Act stated by law, I can switch out my filter or if THEY state I must use theirs, they have to give it to me for FREE. This stops proprietary common use parts gouging like filters, tires, oil, and ect....
 
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