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Discussion Starter #1

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Well it does drive similarly to an automatic in terms of operation. There may be some new habits/driving styles that owners will have to learn, but nothing that I could foresee causing any damage. One would hope that overheating clutches does not occur with regular use.
 

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In a conventional automatic transmission the warranty applies to the entire mechanism, all parts inside the transmission case, with the torque converter included.
In a stick shift or manual transmission the warranty applies to the parts inside the transm. case, but the clutch itself is considered a wear item and seldom gets warranty coverage.
The clutch mechanism in a manual trans includes the flywheel, clutch disc and clutch pressure plate, plus other parts like the throw-out bearing, clutch master and clutch slave cylinder, or the clutch cable if it isn't a hydraulic system.
The reason is that an unskilled driver can ruin (wear out) a clutch disc in a matter of weeks or months; think about someone always slipping the clutch or stepping on the brakes. The clutch disc, the brake pads, the tires are all wear items and usually not covered by the warranty. A drifter can destroy the tires in a day, therefore not warranted.

Now my question is: in the Hyundai or Kia DCT transmission are the transmission internal parts covered WITH the clutch parts, or only the gears etc?

By the way I can drive a stick just fine, I was a Honda tech. My wife had driven our previous VW GTI (DSG trans.) like an automatic, and so did I, never had a problem. Nevertheless,
I'm interested in warranty coverage, because if the clutch itself is not included it could become a huge repair bill if it goes out.
I did call Kia customer service once about this and I didn't get a satisfactory answer.
 

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Something else I'd like to add, the Hyundai Tuscon with the DCT trans. had some problems.
Not too many cars, but the problem cars had symptoms like taking off from a Stop sign or traffic light and the engine would rev high, the car doesn't move, then suddenly bangs itself into gear and the car shoots out.
They had several updates and it helped and I think the worst is behind us, but it doesn't mean the DCT transmissions are completely trouble free, well, nothing is trouble free in a machine.
Interestingly, many high-end cars are now going back to traditional 8 or 10 speed torque converter automatics. The new Kia Stinger has an 8-speed slush box.
I am not against the DCT, drove a H. Elantra Sport with the DCT, drove our previous VW GTI with the DSG, and loved both.
Then again, we need to be vigilant and keep an eye on whatever comes up, that's why we need this forum, and we need more members.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I can't see the dry clutch being covered -- from:

https://www.hyundaiautocanada.com/warranty/

Covers most engine and transaxle components.

Covers repair or replacement of powertrain components (i.e. selected Engine, Transmission / Transaxle, and 4WD components), originally manufactured or installed by Hyundai that are defective in material or factory workmanship, under normal use and maintenance.
 

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Thanks, Shel

It says: "Covers most engine and transaxle components."

"Most" is like, "more or less". It is up the the interpreter, be it the service manager at the dealership, or a clerk in Hyundai corporate.
I wish we could contact Hyundai to explain it for the rest of us.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
It's the "defective in material or factory workmanship, under normal use and maintenance", that make me skeptical on a wear item.

But at least as a dual clutch, maybe it has twice the life as each is used with every second change (??) --if I'm understanding the operation.
 

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It's the "defective in material or factory workmanship, under normal use and maintenance", that make me skeptical on a wear item.

But at least as a dual clutch, maybe it has twice the life as each is used with every second change (??) --if I'm understanding the operation.
I guess it has to be proven if someone actually drove it beyond normal usage which makes you wonder what falls under that criteria. Being up to their judgement i bet knowing a good dealer would be a good start.
 

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I guess it has to be proven if someone actually drove it beyond normal usage which makes you wonder what falls under that criteria. Being up to their judgement i bet knowing a good dealer would be a good start.

It is pretty hard to abuse or drive a dual clutch transmission out of its normal operating conditions. Hyundai's don't have launch controls in them, so it's pretty hard to abuse it beyond just flooring it. Not sure if it will force the next gear and up-shift even if you don't or not? In a Porsche it won't shift to next gear unless you do. Yes I realize it won't be built as heavy as Porsches PDK's. The clutches in the Hyundai should last very long, un-like a reg standard where people ride clutches and don't know how to drive them properly. The computer always drives them the right way in basically every driving condition you could put it in.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
The videos suggested that continuous inching up in jams by easing off the brake was equivalent to riding the clutch, as first gear would never fully engage, but rather slip and heat up the clutch every time you momentarily inch up --- they say it's better to inch up less often over a bigger gap each time, which would firstly of course be less often and secondly fully engage.
 

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The videos suggested that continuous inching up in jams by easing off the brake was equivalent to riding the clutch, as first gear would never fully engage, but rather slip and heat up the clutch every time you momentarily inch up --- they say it's better to inch up less often over a bigger gap each time, which would firstly of course be less often and secondly fully engage.


Yes that's about only time you " could really abuse it" I never do that, probably because I also have a bike and my hand wants to fall off from squeezing clutch in and out. I don't move until there is at least one car length to move in traffic. Doesn't matter if its the bike or car.
 

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Today we purchased a new Kona Limited front-wheel drive, red with black leather and the turbo engine with the 7-speed DCT transmission.
Last week I e-mailed five different dealers in the Sacramento, CA area, and the offers kept coming. The best quote came from Roseville Hyundai, at $ 24,000. I printed the manager's e mail and just gave it to the sales associate as we walked in. His name is Ivan Contreras, super nice young man, highly recommended.
They did honor the price without a single hiccup. The MSRP with floor mats and destination was $ 25,805. We paid the 24,000, and with the sales tax and DMV fees our out the door price came to $ 26,301. That is a $ 1,800 discount from the MSRP. No finance charges, it was a cash deal. The Roseville Hyundai dealership accepted a personal check from us, even after I offered to get a cashier's check; they said don't bother. What a great place to get a new car.
We reset the trip computer before we left the dealership. It was an 83-mile trip back to Paradise. Coming home, some freeway and fast secondary roads, no traffic, speeds from 45-70 mph, the average mpg was shown 38.1 on the computer.
As we got closer to home and began climbing the mountain, our average dropped to 36 mpg. I figure the real number must be closer to 33-34, but even that is a great number.
The Kona turbo is a real blast to drive. Acceleration is about the same as our 2015 Santa Fe Sport turbo, but the steering, handling, overall responsiveness and the small, nimble nature of the Kona was a pure joy. The only car I ever liked even more was the VW GTI we had in 2007.
I think the GTI is the only threat to the Kona in that price range. The Kona will do for Hyundai what the Soul did for Kia: fill the cash registers.
I am 5'9, 178 lbs, and with the power seat fully raised I had plenty of head room and I was comfortable. I kept switching the DCT from D mode to manual mode and didn't experience any of the slipping, hesitation issues this transmission is known for. Driving the Kona in sport mode with the manual mode on the open road I was happy to find a car I can enjoy.
Once I start checking gas mileage with accurate calculation, I will report it back. To be honest, I'd be satisfied to get 24-26 overall mpg, this car is such a fun ride that suddenly the cost of filling up disappears.
 

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I'd like to start a new thread about gas mileage, but I can't find the "NEW THREAD" link. Is there a moderator who can advise me?
Anyway, today I went on a short, 7 mile drive in our town where the speed limit ranges from 30 to 35 miles. Short drives are not beneficial for good gas mileage due to the engine needs to be properly warmed up for best results.
I stopped once at Chase Bank of Paradise, CA, got some money and drove back home.
By the time I arrived the trip computer was showing 40 mpg as average. Our 2015 Santa Fe Sport shows 27 mpg as average, but when I calculate myself the real mpg is 2 mpg less, so we get about 24.5 or 25 as the real gas consumption.
Our Kona is a Limited front wheel drive. Once I'll have 3-4 tanks used up I will calculate the real mpg and compare it with the trip computer.
Anyway, if we get anything near 33-35 as average, I think it's fantastic.
Please comment about your own experiences regarding gas mileage.
 

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Inching Up

It's easier said than done. Driving in New York City traffic and highways with accidents or construction requires inching up rather frequently. Now I get worried in those situations. Should I be?
 

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My wife couldn't drive a manual trans. car to save her own life from an eighteen-wheeler.
But she never had a problem driving our former VW GTI with the DSG and now she drives the Kona with the DCT. No problems.
Our traffic here means maybe four cars waiting for the left turn signal, so, your situation could be different.
 

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I have a 2016 Hyundai veloster turbo and have had 2 Dual clutch transmissions replaced and 3 flywheels ALL UNDER WARRANTY. 35k miles 1st issue & 81k miles on 2nd issue.
 

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I can't see the dry clutch being covered -- from:

https://www.hyundaiautocanada.com/warranty/

Covers most engine and transaxle components.

Covers repair or replacement of powertrain components (i.e. selected Engine, Transmission / Transaxle, and 4WD components), originally manufactured or installed by Hyundai that are defective in material or factory workmanship, under normal use and maintenance.
Everything is cover in the Powertrain for 100K.:grin:
 

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don't know about the rest of the owners here? The DCT seems to have gotten smoother shifting over time in auto mode. I have about 6K miles right now. I know there is a self learning/adjusting mode for the first 1K miles. I noticed the smoother action after 2K+ miles.
 
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