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Hi everyone,

This week, I received an email from Hyundai Canada to either bring my 2020 Kona EV Ultimate to the dealership for a software update or do it myself. To do it yourself, it's straightforward. You install an app on your computer, download the update package, save it on a USB stick, and plug it into your car's USB port. When you start the car, it automatically starts the update. It took three hours to complete and I had no issue doing the update. However, it did completely change the look of the display screen and I also lost my saved settings. Now, I will have to figure out how to resave my favorite widgets, and my radio and satelite radio channels. I don't understand why Hyndai would change the look of a screen that was nice to begin with. I hate the new radio screen display. It shows vintage tubes with numbers inside each tube. It's just ugly.

Has anyone done the update and run into issues?
 

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Did not update yet. Also never listen to radio lol
I'm thinking I'll just get the dealer to do it
 

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Hi everyone,

However, it did completely change the look of the display screen and I also lost my saved settings. Now, I will have to figure out how to resave my favorite widgets, and my radio and satelite radio channels. I don't understand why Hyndai would change the look of a screen that was nice to begin with. I hate the new radio screen display. It shows vintage tubes with numbers inside each tube. It's just ugly.

Has anyone done the update and run into issues?
Hi Terry - I had the dealer do my update in November, and my home screen changed also. But between barely driving the car, working remotely from home since March, and just being busy I haven't tinkered to try to change it back. Any luck, or are we stuck with the new screen?

Btw, I didn't lose any of my radio presets or anything else. Only the main dashboard screen changed.

David
 

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Terry,
Can you post the link where you got the updates?

Did they say they will accept warranty claims/liability should the car decide to catch on fire and burn your house down?
In other words, does Hyundai approve of DIY software updates?
I think it is a risk... they may claim the update was not done correctly / successfully.
Seems like a convenient out for them if they want to avoid liability.
How would you prove you did it, and you did it correctly?
 

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Hi everyone,

This week, I received an email from Hyundai Canada to either bring my 2020 Kona EV Ultimate to the dealership for a software update or do it myself. To do it yourself, it's straightforward. You install an app on your computer, download the update package, save it on a USB stick, and plug it into your car's USB port. When you start the car, it automatically starts the update. It took three hours to complete and I had no issue doing the update. However, it did completely change the look of the display screen and I also lost my saved settings. Now, I will have to figure out how to resave my favorite widgets, and my radio and satelite radio channels. I don't understand why Hyndai would change the look of a screen that was nice to begin with. I hate the new radio screen display. It shows vintage tubes with numbers inside each tube. It's just ugly.

Has anyone done the update and run into issues?
 

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Hi Terry,

I feel for you as well. Did this update a few days ago on the software but also on the maps. Update was done in about 25 minutes on our Kona electric 2019 but the display is horrendous, including the maps. My wife also lost all of her radio stations. If someone at Hyundai reads this, it's time for another update to rectify this mess. I have not looked into my winter driving settings yet, but I bet it wiped out everything.
 

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Firmware is not very sophisticated, and the update tends to do a complete reinit. This usually loses all your settings.
To maintain the settings would makes things unreasonably complicated. For example what if the update changed the database schema? e.g.: they added or deleted some fields, or changed the order of the fields? To make sure the data and the new code still lines up after the update would be pretty hard, esp. the amount of storage available for firmware is often limited ( for adding the code that would be needed to do a non-destructive update) . So a non-destructive update is just considered unreasonably difficult, and it is a lot simpler to start over from scratch.
 

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Firmware is not very sophisticated, and the update tends to do a complete reinit. This usually loses all your settings.
To maintain the settings would makes things unreasonably complicated. For example what if the update changed the database schema? e.g.: they added or deleted some fields, or changed the order of the fields? To make sure the data and the new code still lines up after the update would be pretty hard, esp. the amount of storage available for firmware is often limited ( for adding the code that would be needed to do a non-destructive update) . So a non-destructive update is just considered unreasonably difficult, and it is a lot simpler to start over from scratch.
Hi Coder,

I understand all the programming "implications" you mentioned. However, I must admit that going the easy route (read wiping all the data no matter the precious time the car owner spent programming it's interface) is much easier than looking for a viable solution. Windows does not (most of the time) wipes your data when it comes out with an update. Nor is the simplest computer program application. Even the most simple app found on Google Store does not delete your data when updated.
 

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Hi Coder,

I understand all the programming "implications" you mentioned. However, I must admit that going the easy route (read wiping all the data no matter the precious time the car owner spent programming it's interface) is much easier than looking for a viable solution. Windows does not (most of the time) wipes your data when it comes out with an update. Nor is the simplest computer program application. Even the most simple app found on Google Store does not delete your data when updated.
I was just thinking the same thing. When my iMac updated the firmware last time (firmware mind you, not macOS) I would be in a state of rage if it had done what has been seemingly deemed appropriate by Hyundai.
 

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A full-blown computer has a lot more resources than an embedded device. More code space, temporary storage, a lot more memory, etc. etc.
So it is entirely feasible to write code for non-destructive updates. On an embedded device, not so much. A much more restrictive environment.
Even the simplest app like you say, has the resources of the full-blown computer and OS available to it. I am not saying it cant be done
it is just that in the embedded environment the standards have been lower historically for the above mentioned reasons.
Esp. when they are pushing out an update to prevent cars from catching on fire, wiping the user's data is probably seen as an acceptable cost.
They may eventually get around to implementing non-destructive updates, but right now they probably have bigger fish to fry.
(You have probably guessed, I am in the software trade. Program storage arrays for a living).
 

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A full-blown computer has a lot more resources than an embedded device. More code space, temporary storage, a lot more memory, etc. etc.
So it is entirely feasible to write code for non-destructive updates. On an embedded device, not so much. A much more restrictive environment.
Even the simplest app like you say, has the resources of the full-blown computer and OS available to it. I am not saying it cant be done
it is just that in the embedded environment the standards have been lower historically for the above mentioned reasons.
Esp. when they are pushing out an update to prevent cars from catching on fire, wiping the user's data is probably seen as an acceptable cost.
They may eventually get around to implementing non-destructive updates, but right now they probably have bigger fish to fry.
(You have probably guessed, I am in the software trade. Program storage arrays for a living).
It just seems they could use a bigger flash drive for swap space and keep some settings OR back it up and restore it after the firmware upgrade. I was poking around and found a way to create an image of my headunit last week and store it on a USB drive.

(I had guessed, but I also have been in that trade in a previous life and know there are more effecient ways than rebuilding from the boots up every time. The problem, I believe, is Hyundai is concerned about their kernel being part of the problem so they are building the boat in the water. Now I'm just a lowly tuba teacher so as long as the car starts...I'm good.)
 

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Isn't the media unit running Android? I would assume the numerous embedded controllers used for everything else are far different beasts, designed for robustness and speed. I counted about 30 of those at a glance.
 

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No idea. Possible. I heard that automotive embedded systems tend to run some form of embedded Linux these days, probably using ARM chips.
My expectations are lower than most. I am just happy if my car does not burst into flames, and gets me where I need to go. :cool:
 

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Ironically, that attribute seems to have become our greatest concern. Here's why I think the media unit uses Android:

4950
 
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