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good luck with that.. It’s a inexpensive CUV ! It’s designed for its intended purpose..
While I enjoy driving the kona briskly whenever I can... It doesn’t inspire confidence when it comes to durability.. Being aware that this is a dry clutch system, that’s enough to let you know it’s not meant to be “abused”. It’s fine for my needs and Im really impressed with the performance out of the box.. but this is not the car I would choose to modify and compete with.
I 100% completely disagree with your post. Sure as a Kona sits it is a soccer mom car . With it's nose dive soft springs. Add stiffer Eibach's and almost non existent rear brake bias is fixed bty 75%. Lower it even more that cuts 25 % more dive away. The Kona chassis is very very stiff, I lift a rear wheel on entrances to shopping malls. Soft bushing are replaced. Chassis measurements are so close to BMW X3 and Audi Q3. The car was 100% designed by X BMW and Audi designers that Hyundai pulled from Germany. The Hyundai Elantra /i30 N is NOTHING but bolt on pieces and if they had a more HP motor and some alignment changes it could bet the Honda Civic R.
 

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Well I guess we just see things different on this issue. I respect your perspective on this.. but I would start elsewhere if I were seeking more performance.. I have another car which takes up my time with maintenance and mods.. So I look to the Kona for its worry free, Stock performance for everyday use.. I thought the thrill of the kona would have worn off by now.. but I'm driving my other car less and less.. Thinking about letting it go and just keeping the Kona as my only car..
I'm tired of having two cars.. These German cars may be fun to drive, but they're not fun to own.

I 100% completely disagree with your post. Sure as a Kona sits it is a soccer mom car . With it's nose dive soft springs. Add stiffer Eibach's and almost non existent rear brake bias is fixed bty 75%. Lower it even more that cuts 25 % more dive away. The Kona chassis is very very stiff, I lift a rear wheel on entrances to shopping malls. Soft bushing are replaced. Chassis measurements are so close to BMW X3 and Audi Q3. The car was 100% designed by X BMW and Audi designers that Hyundai pulled from Germany. The Hyundai Elantra /i30 N is NOTHING but bolt on pieces and if they had a more HP motor and some alignment changes it could bet the Honda Civic R.
 

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good luck with that.. It’s a inexpensive CUV ! It’s designed for its intended purpose..
While I enjoy driving the kona briskly whenever I can... It doesn’t inspire confidence when it comes to durability.. Being aware that this is a dry clutch system, that’s enough to let you know it’s not meant to be “abused”. It’s fine for my needs and Im really impressed with the performance out of the box.. but this is not the car I would choose to modify and compete with.
I disagree with your post. Because many many times the only difference between a grocery getter and race car that wins are "simple bolt on parts" A VW Golf turns into a GTI or even better a AWD Golf turns into a Golf R, a simple Subaru sedan turns into a WRX . All by simple bolt on parts. And the the homely beginning cars on some of these are "homely as heck", boring as heck, ass draggers.

You do know the Kona was designed by both an X Audi and X BMW designer along with Hyundai's suspensions designs that were done earlier. The multi-link is German designed. You will also find out that the Audi Q3 and BMW X 1,2,3 and Kona come very close in sizing and suspension points. And we see Hyundai i30 TSR race car uses stock suspension pick up points and has won 2 years in a row in the manufacture challenge which include Audi and Honda

As for clutches, you say ..dry clutch = un-durable. Every small car we had in our euro car club had wimpy burn -um-up stock clutches. Then you buy a high perf or semi-race clutch and we had zero problems. My 78 VW Scirroco was thrashed and burned in autocross and street raced with nitrous with it's little high perf clutch. It kept working without issue with 275 hp on the button and 185 NA. It would go through 2 driveshafts a season, but never a transmission or clutch, and we are talking a tiny dry clutch.

The Hyundai Kona has a very very stiff chassis, so stiff that I can lift rear wheels entering shopping mall drive entrances now. I HAD and you have, horrible rear brake bias with major nose dive and rear lift. Put in a set of Eibach's and you fix that by 75%. Lower it another 1 inch and install Whiteline anti-dive bushings and you fix another 10%, and then add semi sport struts and shocks that also improved dive. Without even adjusting rear brake bias in the ABS I went from a really kinda bad braking car to really really good braking car with very very minimal dive of any form. My front is as low as a 2019 Hyundai Elantra GT N-Line and if you look at it at a dealer it is very low. Yes, my angles are at the limit, but I have not notice any bumpsteer and is solid as a rock on the road. I was expecting some, but thankfully I don't notice it. You make the car you want. Any car can handle like a a great handling sport car. Even if I had the money for a VW Golf R I wouldn't get one, too boring looking and homogenized looking, no hard lines. The Kona and it's German design, looks great with quirky and nice lines. Minus the rear lights in the fender of course.

The Kona is simply a car hatchback with a thicker sub-frames/lower suspension bolt points to raise the body. Just pull it back down to a car and you only have a crossover by name only.Now I have high perf AWD car hatchback.
 

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To my point: you’re already talking about modifying the ABS, brake distribution, shocks, clutch, stamped steel suspension parts, etc.…
I really don’t think there is a right or wrong here. We just have a different approach to performance or a different place to start. Believe me, I’m not taking anything away from the performance of the car. I think it’s great obviously, I own one. But that wasn’t the original purpose for why I bought the Kona. I use it to get parts for the bimmer, LOL
As a wise engineer and owner of aftermarket forced induction systems, corky bell, said it the best. “If you want a fast car, buy a fast car“. I agree with him and try to get as close as possible to the goal as money will allow.
for the street, the Kona as it sits out of the box is commendable. I would consider tweaking it through software, shocks, tires and simple mods like that, to get the most out of what it already has. I would not go past that.
Now let me admit my hypocrisy. I have modded almost every car I’ve owned beyond what it was designed to do. I usually ended up with something that went fast but the handling/braking never matched the power, Never had that one piece balanced Cohesive feel to it. It wasn’t until I got into the corvette world And bought a Z06 That I realized the difference when you start with performance and handling As your main goal.
I enjoyed the discussion and I admire your ability and skills in finding all these mods and parts that fit this new model. Time will tell if the aftermarket will see the kona as a good platform for modding.

I disagree with your post. Because many many times the only difference between a grocery getter and race car that wins are "simple bolt on parts" A VW Golf turns into a GTI or even better a AWD Golf turns into a Golf R, a simple Subaru sedan turns into a WRX . All by simple bolt on parts. And the the homely beginning cars on some of these are "homely as heck", boring as heck, ass draggers.

You do know the Kona was designed by both an X Audi and X BMW designer along with Hyundai's suspensions designs that were done earlier. The multi-link is German designed. You will also find out that the Audi Q3 and BMW X 1,2,3 and Kona come very close in sizing and suspension points. And we see Hyundai i30 TSR race car uses stock suspension pick up points and has won 2 years in a row in the manufacture challenge which include Audi and Honda

As for clutches, you say ..dry clutch = un-durable. Every small car we had in our euro car club had wimpy burn -um-up stock clutches. Then you buy a high perf or semi-race clutch and we had zero problems. My 78 VW Scirroco was thrashed and burned in autocross and street raced with nitrous with it's little high perf clutch. It kept working without issue with 275 hp on the button and 185 NA. It would go through 2 driveshafts a season, but never a transmission or clutch, and we are talking a tiny dry clutch.

The Hyundai Kona has a very very stiff chassis, so stiff that I can lift rear wheels entering shopping mall drive entrances now. I HAD and you have, horrible rear brake bias with major nose dive and rear lift. Put in a set of Eibach's and you fix that by 75%. Lower it another 1 inch and install Whiteline anti-dive bushings and you fix another 10%, and then add semi sport struts and shocks that also improved dive. Without even adjusting rear brake bias in the ABS I went from a really kinda bad braking car to really really good braking car with very very minimal dive of any form. My front is as low as a 2019 Hyundai Elantra GT N-Line and if you look at it at a dealer it is very low. Yes, my angles are at the limit, but I have not notice any bumpsteer and is solid as a rock on the road. I was expecting some, but thankfully I don't notice it. You make the car you want. Any car can handle like a a great handling sport car. Even if I had the money for a VW Golf R I wouldn't get one, too boring looking and homogenized looking, no hard lines. The Kona and it's German design, looks great with quirky and nice lines. Minus the rear lights in the fender of course.

The Kona is simply a car hatchback with a thicker sub-frames/lower suspension bolt points to raise the body. Just pull it back down to a car and you only have a crossover by name only.Now I have high perf AWD car hatchback.
 

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We have 2019 KONA with DCT. But we also drive manual transmission vehicles, and understand clutch operation. HOWEVER, if I was a daily commuter who had to endure an hour of creeping along in start and stop and start and stop traffic, I would get a regular automatic transmission. Just like slipping a clutch in stop and start traffic is a pain and hard on the clutch, I see the DCT not being as happy as a regular automatic in that situation. The DCT has a "high temperature warning light", you don't get that with an automatic. Same reason I would not get a DCT, or drive a manual transmission, if I lived like in the hilly parts of San Francisco.
 

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To my point: you’re already talking about modifying the ABS, brake distribution, shocks, clutch, stamped steel suspension parts, etc.…
I really don’t think there is a right or wrong here. We just have a different approach to performance or a different place to start. Believe me, I’m not taking anything away from the performance of the car. I think it’s great obviously, I own one. But that wasn’t the original purpose for why I bought the Kona. I use it to get parts for the bimmer, LOL
As a wise engineer and owner of aftermarket forced induction systems, corky bell, said it the best. “If you want a fast car, buy a fast car“. I agree with him and try to get as close as possible to the goal as money will allow.
for the street, the Kona as it sits out of the box is commendable. I would consider tweaking it through software, shocks, tires and simple mods like that, to get the most out of what it already has. I would not go past that.
Now let me admit my hypocrisy. I have modded almost every car I’ve owned beyond what it was designed to do. I usually ended up with something that went fast but the handling/braking never matched the power, Never had that one piece balanced Cohesive feel to it. It wasn’t until I got into the corvette world And bought a Z06 That I realized the difference when you start with performance and handling As your main goal.
I enjoyed the discussion and I admire your ability and skills in finding all these mods and parts that fit this new model. Time will tell if the aftermarket will see the kona as a good platform for modding.
The Kona will not have much for performance parts. The good thing is a lot of Hyundai parts are interchangable. Just look at this site, one of largest English speaking sites in the world for the Kona . What, maybe 3-4 people with lowering springs, and 3 people waiting for non ebay grade coilovers. Asian sites have a lot more cars modified I would bet, but no use in tracking those sites down when we can't read them.....Oh wait , Google translator.

I no longer need to even consider touching the brakes (except slots would be nice to de-gas,) that problem was solved with springs, shocks, and anti-dive geometry bushings. There is very little excessive weight transfer now. I am even satisfied with the brake pads for now. As far as stamped steel parts, that is not me. The aluminum would be nice, but they are a waste of money for me now. Maybe later from a bone yard. I wished I had time to strengthen mine when I installed the bushings, but there was no time. I have a TIG welder, so it will happen at some point. I know the Veloster has a lower plate welded to the bottom that I will copy. For you , I would just get the set of Eibach's and call it a day. Night and day difference, and still a smooth ride. The stock shocks are stiff enough to handle the Eibach spring rate, which are still soft. That's why I tried to get Eibach to make Sport springs with stiffer spring rate, for me it needs more. They would have to stay at the same height as the Pro-Kit because of suspension travel. I was surprised they even offered the springs for Kona so soon, but I think someone high up at Eibach Germany had pull to get their Kona engineered for springs and they did it. They are kind of hidden on their site and not even on the UK site, Ebayer's and Amazoners have them for sale, so they are in the wild.
 

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Just a note to future buyers if they are on the fence. The Hyundai Kona DCT is NOT good for a racing transmission what DCT was designed for in true race cars. Hyundai 100% tuned this for common old man and old woman and soccer mom use. It shifts SO smooth and ok fast driving normally. As far as "sport driving" this exact transmission...the Hyundai DCT it is not that refined in all out sport use. This is where you see the flaws of crap coding /algorithm. You get what appears to me 80% engagement with clutch spin OR the engine timing is pulled WAY back it flounders. And I run 93 octane , so it is not knock sensors, it is crap coding. A VW DCT in sport mode this DCT is NOT. As a soccer mom transmission it excels.

Hyundai needs one DCT engineer to spend another 3 months on smoothing out the coding for aggressive sport use .
Totally agree, it's either bad coding or possibly the lack of some key sensor that means they have to code on assumptions rather than measured engine/transmission load.

I was thinking about this again yesterday>
For anyone driving the DCT in comfort mode, as you accelerate feel how hard it pulls in second and third, then ask yourself why it doesn't pull that hard in first? First is lower geared, it should be capable of pulling harder that the higher gears with less effort :cautious::cautious::cautious:. All you get is more clutch slip if you try to accelerate faster, rather than any actual rapid launch.

And no, I'm not a racer. Were I live (and in some other countries) we have a lot of roundabouts instead of traffic lights. They keep the traffic flow regulated, however they result in you coming to a stop, then accelerating briskly through the roundabout without slowing cars approaching from your side or already in the roundabout. It's all about the responsiveness from stationary to about 20kmh then hold. So the worst experience is clutch slip and delay, followed by massive lurch as it kicks in the middle of the roundabout.
 

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The Kona will not have much for performance parts. The good thing is a lot of Hyundai parts are interchangable. Just look at this site, one of largest English speaking sites in the world for the Kona . What, maybe 3-4 people with lowering springs, and 3 people waiting for non ebay grade coilovers. Asian sites have a lot more cars modified I would bet, but no use in tracking those sites down when we can't read them.....Oh wait , Google translator.

I no longer need to even consider touching the brakes (except slots would be nice to de-gas,) that problem was solved with springs, shocks, and anti-dive geometry bushings. There is very little excessive weight transfer now. I am even satisfied with the brake pads for now. As far as stamped steel parts, that is not me. The aluminum would be nice, but they are a waste of money for me now. Maybe later from a bone yard. I wished I had time to strengthen mine when I installed the bushings, but there was no time. I have a TIG welder, so it will happen at some point. I know the Veloster has a lower plate welded to the bottom that I will copy. For you , I would just get the set of Eibach's and call it a day. Night and day difference, and still a smooth ride. The stock shocks are stiff enough to handle the Eibach spring rate, which are still soft. That's why I tried to get Eibach to make Sport springs with stiffer spring rate, for me it needs more. They would have to stay at the same height as the Pro-Kit because of suspension travel. I was surprised they even offered the springs for Kona so soon, but I think someone high up at Eibach Germany had pull to get their Kona engineered for springs and they did it. They are kind of hidden on their site and not even on the UK site, Ebayer's and Amazoners have them for sale, so they are in the wild.
Good advice on the springs rather than shocks.. The fact that the kona doesn't need any wrenching or modding is quite pleasing to me.. I've grown weary of sweating in the garage.. Nice having clean finger nails and no dried out hands from the orange cleaner.. I got one grandson turning 15 in march. Going to buy him his first car in another year or so.. I sure he would get more enjoyment out of a civic or some used car than I'm getting with my 2nd car.
 

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I can answer that, when you are talking about 1 gear limiting torque. That is by design and for the most part 100% correct
Totally agree, it's either bad coding or possibly the lack of some key sensor that means they have to code on assumptions rather than measured engine/transmission load.

I was thinking about this again yesterday>
For anyone driving the DCT in comfort mode, as you accelerate feel how hard it pulls in second and third, then ask yourself why it doesn't pull that hard in first? First is lower geared, it should be capable of pulling harder that the higher gears with less effort :cautious::cautious::cautious:. All you get is more clutch slip if you try to accelerate faster, rather than any actual rapid launch.

And no, I'm not a racer. Were I live (and in some other countries) we have a lot of roundabouts instead of traffic lights. They keep the traffic flow regulated, however they result in you coming to a stop, then accelerating briskly through the roundabout without slowing cars approaching from your side or already in the roundabout. It's all about the responsiveness from stationary to about 20kmh then hold. So the worst experience is clutch slip and delay, followed by massive lurch as it kicks in the middle of the roundabout.
I can answer that, when you are talking about 1st gear limiting torque. That is by design and for the most part, It is 100% correct to do. I want that , there is way too much gear multiplier with the little driveshafts and internals. Now 2nd gear I do want 100% power/torque and for the most part , you are getting most of it I would be willing to bet. I SURE HOPE there is a different algorithm for 1.6T power application to the flywheel with AWD vs FWD so us AWD people can take advantage of all 4 wheels laying down power. I again assume there is.....I sure hope there is. Yes, they still need to polish the DCT algorithm for sport use. I may try to contact Hyundai engineering thru a back channel I know of and comment on this. 98% chance I will be shut down with their "protect the engineer from commoners" firewall. Good, but bad that at least I am not the only one who feels this.

Ok, discount and except that they have to pull back power in first gear, there is just too much torque in 1st gear. Lets concentrate on addressing what "appears" to be clutch slip, but 90% of me thinks it is a MASSIVE timing pull back when it shouldn't be....because it sometimes lays the power down. It is not always happening in the same scenario.

rcheli32. What year and model do you have? AWD?
 

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I push the sport button & manually shift my 6 spd auto, less potential drama, just fun.
Absolutely the only way to go! Sometimes a little weirdness on a cold start, but definitely sport mode and manually shifting is the way to go whenever possible. And fun. Drove a manual all my life, and this is pretty close.
 

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good luck with that.. It’s a inexpensive CUV ! It’s designed for its intended purpose..
While I enjoy driving the kona briskly whenever I can... It doesn’t inspire confidence when it comes to durability.. Being aware that this is a dry clutch system, that’s enough to let you know it’s not meant to be “abused”. It’s fine for my needs and Im really impressed with the performance out of the box.. but this is not the car I would choose to modify and compete with.
There's an $1100 package you can get to address the engine, transmission, and pedal tuning. Theres a discussion on this forum I think DTUK is the manufacturer. They say it doesn't leave any trails that affect the warranty.
 

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No Thanks.. address the drivetrain how ? Is it’s reliability proven ? Anyone can add more boost, up the rev limiter, bypass sensors, modify shift points, etc.. Just because they can, doesn’t mean they should. Some of these aftermarket kits are hastily brought to market without testing or worrying about the results.
I would want to free up the intake and exhaust FIRST and address Any weak points before adding more power.
Doing suspension upgrades, tires and upgrading to better lubricants would be A better place to start, IMO. I would let someone else flush out the aftermarket dangers that await.




There's an $1100 package you can get to address the engine, transmission, and pedal tuning. Theres a discussion on this forum I think DTUK is the manufacturer. They say it doesn't leave any trails that affect the warranty.
 

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The upgrades don't abuse the car, the driver does. Note that this addresses both the engine performance and the transmission deficiencies. How you abuse the improvements is left up to you. This consists of 3 kits, each of which can be purchased separately. I furnish this as a courtesy to those on the forum who are interested in improving the shortcomings. I owned a Kia Soul that makes 190hp with the same engine, same torque as the Kona. No AWD available...why I traded it in. Neither Kia nor Hyundai are very responsive to US needs or wants... or maybe anyone else's either...So you have to look for alternatives or buy a Honda.
 

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The driver may be unaware he is abusing the car if the aftermarket programming is faulty or allows the car to exceed its limits. For example.. running an engine lean yields more power but raises the EGT (exhaust gas temp) which causes detonation. If you end up with this condition but don’t realize it’s happenning, driving any which way will be an issue.
Another cheap mod via software is to raise the boost for more power.. that Can lead to several similar problems as well.. Running more boost also creates more heat which the stock IC may not be able to handle, and more psi requires more fuel, etc..
Call me skeptical, I would have to see some proven reliability and some safe operating specs before I would consider it safe. Then there is the issue of ethics. Why should Hyundai and future buyers pay for repairs someone else created by their mods..
I’m no saint.. but if you wanna play, you got to pay.. I befriended dealerships for that reason..

The upgrades don't abuse the car, the driver does. Note that this addresses both the engine performance and the transmission deficiencies. How you abuse the improvements is left up to you. This consists of 3 kits, each of which can be purchased separately. I furnish this as a courtesy to those on the forum who are interested in improving the shortcomings. I owned a Kia Soul that makes 190hp with the same engine, same torque as the Kona. No AWD available...why I traded it in. Neither Kia nor Hyundai are very responsive to US needs or wants... or maybe anyone else's either...So you have to look for alternatives or buy a Honda.
 

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The upgrades don't abuse the car, the driver does. Note that this addresses both the engine performance and the transmission deficiencies. How you abuse the improvements is left up to you. This consists of 3 kits, each of which can be purchased separately. I furnish this as a courtesy to those on the forum who are interested in improving the shortcomings. I owned a Kia Soul that makes 190hp with the same engine, same torque as the Kona. No AWD available...why I traded it in. Neither Kia nor Hyundai are very responsive to US needs or wants... or maybe anyone else's either...So you have to look for alternatives or buy a Honda.
These upgrade are far from abuse. There is more robustness built into Hyundai and other cars a 10% to 15% increase is moot for 99% of kits installed. Now deviation of outcome and quality of personality from the marketing promises is a real factor we must hold as a marketing deviation.

Hyundai and Honda and others, could careless about your "needs" after purchase. I guess the Kona true "N" that is highly rumored is filling a need, but that's before purchase. That is where "all of them" only care. Before is the key word here.

We already know about the stuff you mentioned. The 3 sellers DTE, DTUK, and RaceChip all sell the main product of the mothership, DTE out of Germany. The others are private label from DTE in the form of exact copy plastic shells with a different manufacture sticker, to a complete newly designed plastic shell of their own making. The software is the same. We also have other tunners who will do ECU tunes, but that is another topic that deviates from the style of alterations and names thrown around in this thread.

DTE is tried and true tested and has won many awards in Europe tuning magazines. They are TUV approved. They for the most part only increase boost by 3-4 lbs. The Hyundai OEM tune has more then enough fuel being dumped in for their piggyback to be safe. They has access to the fuel rail, so DTE has access to increase fuel if needed. All Hyundai safe guards for engine management are still used with any of the 3 sellers. From my research DTE's software seems to be the best choice for reliability and units sold to make them the leader in reliable safe piggyback tune.

As far as DTUK's DCT tune, There has been one Hyundai Kona some where where the guy flashed it and it failed. aHe had to have the dealer reflash it back to OEM, NO warranty for that guy on his transmission or possible engine. Plus, in the Audi Sport forum there has be talk of it there too some good some bad. Some see nothing and it looks as if you have to drive it very aggressive after the 5 minute idle time at the end of the flash. There was a guy there that had a rear diff problem and Audi pulled the diagnostic data and found the "undetectable" DTUK trans tune on the flash count meter. Not so undetectable I guess. This of course was found when it was sent back to Audi for research and I bet Audi's main engineering guys found it where the dealer couldn't. That's what I heard about Hyundai's too, the dealer can't catch a piggyback, but an advanced engineer with a data dump reading the full advanced data code can.

Getting back to the DTUK flash, some found that the flash lasted to a point and if not driven hard it diverted back to oem shifting, with a couple saying that was in normal mode , but sport mode kinda kept the advanced flash. So-anyway you look at it, it is a gamble on it working 100% as advertised. You may read it differently because I speed read through it .

For use guys who want to keep a warranty, this is all a risk. Now 2-3 years down the road I might consider it, but early in life with a $25,000 car and a small pocket book , I will pass. Full suspension modes and no warranty, I will do, since the cost of fixing that is so minimal and the chances of anything wearing is so far down the time scale. Since owning a small hobby Audi repair shop years ago, wheel bearing and the like, that will be warranty voided because of lowering are cheap and an easy Saturday job IF and only IF it became a need to replace issue.

https://www.audi-sport.net/xf/threads/dtuk-tcu-gearbox-flash-review.379005/


.
 

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Thanks, this is very helpful. I would have never considered the TCU flash had the DTC not been so quirky. What started me looking for performance increases is the difference in HP (same torque) on the Kia Soul with the same engine/transmission. I owned a Soul but traded for the Kona to get awd. I drive in muddy conditions often and had to tow the Soul with my tractor on several occasions. I can't believe there's any physical difference between the Soul and the Kona engine/transmission. They're built on the same platform. So I'm guessing Hyundai tuning maps are different. It would be nice to be able to get a Hyundai fix for both the HP and the transmission ... Of course, this would be my first choice.
 

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I can answer that, when you are talking about 1 gear limiting torque. That is by design and for the most part 100% correct


I can answer that, when you are talking about 1st gear limiting torque. That is by design and for the most part, It is 100% correct to do. I want that , there is way too much gear multiplier with the little driveshafts and internals. Now 2nd gear I do want 100% power/torque and for the most part , you are getting most of it I would be willing to bet. I SURE HOPE there is a different algorithm for 1.6T power application to the flywheel with AWD vs FWD so us AWD people can take advantage of all 4 wheels laying down power. I again assume there is.....I sure hope there is. Yes, they still need to polish the DCT algorithm for sport use. I may try to contact Hyundai engineering thru a back channel I know of and comment on this. 98% chance I will be shut down with their "protect the engineer from commoners" firewall. Good, but bad that at least I am not the only one who feels this.

Ok, discount and except that they have to pull back power in first gear, there is just too much torque in 1st gear. Lets concentrate on addressing what "appears" to be clutch slip, but 90% of me thinks it is a MASSIVE timing pull back when it shouldn't be....because it sometimes lays the power down. It is not always happening in the same scenario.

rcheli32. What year and model do you have? AWD?
I'm in Australia with a 2018 "Elite" AWD. I'm really hoping you get some insights into what's going on so I can satisfy my curiosity. I agree that occasionally it gets the power application just right, and it seems to be a timing thing more than anything else. I've realised I now take my foot off the brake a good few seconds before I need to launch through an intersection, because that way I know the clutch will be starting to engage by the time I need it. It's not a good way to drive though, relatively unsafe compared to a conventional torque converter setup that gives you power the instant you raise the revs.

Oh and full disclosure, I've got an IT background so naturally my brain is just wishing we could get access to personalize the parameters!
 

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I'm not experiencing what you describe on take off.. Depending on conditions, since 1st is so low, I start off slow until the clutch is fully engaged and then accelerate. 1st is geared very low.. I think many think the clutch slips the whole time, but its a low granny gear and is designed to allow fast clutch engagement. There are times when I take a tight slow turn and accel I feel more slippage than necessary.. but letting off the gas a bit allows the unit to engage or shift up.. I do keep it in sport mode most of the time..

I'm in Australia with a 2018 "Elite" AWD. I'm really hoping you get some insights into what's going on so I can satisfy my curiosity. I agree that occasionally it gets the power application just right, and it seems to be a timing thing more than anything else. I've realised I now take my foot off the brake a good few seconds before I need to launch through an intersection, because that way I know the clutch will be starting to engage by the time I need it. It's not a good way to drive though, relatively unsafe compared to a conventional torque converter setup that gives you power the instant you raise the revs.

Oh and full disclosure, I've got an IT background so naturally my brain is just wishing we could get access to personalize the parameters!
 

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I'm in Australia with a 2018 "Elite" AWD. I'm really hoping you get some insights into what's going on so I can satisfy my curiosity. I agree that occasionally it gets the power application just right, and it seems to be a timing thing more than anything else. I've realised I now take my foot off the brake a good few seconds before I need to launch through an intersection, because that way I know the clutch will be starting to engage by the time I need it. It's not a good way to drive though, relatively unsafe compared to a conventional torque converter setup that gives you power the instant you raise the revs.

Oh and full disclosure, I've got an IT background so naturally my brain is just wishing we could get access to personalize the parameters!
I guess if you do an ECU tune, and fix the timing pull back on EVER shift, the Hyundai DCT is a different animal. It is just WHEN the owner of an ECU tuned Kona wants to give up their drivetrain warranty to get it.

If you are in IT, you will appreciate this I bet, this is how I get on the internet at my house.



Two different enterprise content filters, Zyxel 's supplier and a fully loaded Untangle Server.

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I guess if you do an ECU tune, and fix the timing pull back on EVER shift, the Hyundai DCT is a different animal. It is just WHEN the owner of an ECU tuned Kona wants to give up their drivetrain warranty to get it.

If you are in IT, you will appreciate this I bet, this is how I get on the internet at my house.



Two different enterprise content filters, Zyxel 's supplier and a fully loaded Untangle Server.

.
Gees, you've got some power concerns there!

I've seen a Kona on Facebook that has seriously upped the engine output, and in addition has a DCT tune applied. I'm thinking just a DCT tune with the standard engine flash would be a huge improvement. So somebody must be doing them, and I'm curious to find out how....
 
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