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Discussion Starter #1
I am in the US, and in my Kona's handbook it says "not recommended for towing" (on 2 seperate pages). I know there are hitches available for my car (200 lb tongue/2k lb tow). I have searched here, online, in my handbook, on Hyundai's site... and can find NOTHING that tells me what my SE could actually tow. Most of the info I have found has been Australian tow specs (we don't have the model/transmission options they do) which don't help me 1 bit. Anyone have a clue about any of this, or where I can look that I haven't already tried? tyia 馃槉
 

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Officially the US version is not rated for towing. Period. Hitches are sold but in theory you are only supposed to use them for things like a bike rack, etc., that people put on now days.

Some people here have done some towing, but I don't know what their results were. Presumably the car should be able to handle roughly what the Aussie stats indicate. I doubt there is any actual difference in how the cars are made, but that's at your discretion. We also had a owner who was told the car could tow by the salesperson and Hyundai ended up buying the car back from him.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Officially the US version is not rated for towing. Period. Hitches are sold but in theory you are only supposed to use them for things like a bike rack, etc., that people put on now days.

Some people here have done some towing, but I don't know what their results were. Presumably the car should be able to handle roughly what the Aussie stats indicate. I doubt there is any actual difference in how the cars are made, but that's at your discretion. We also had a owner who was told the car could tow by the salesperson and Hyundai ended up buying the car back from him.
It all boiled down to a debate and Oz member and I were having in my Kona group. I said they're not supposed to tow anything, yet she was throwing out ridiculous towing #'s that were listed on Oz sites. I won't ever put a hitch on my Kona. No need. I was just trying to verify that her towing expectations down under were WAY over rated. Thank you for pretty much confirming that, and now she's actually been to the dealership, she too, has seen it. 馃槉
 

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The last year Hyundai posted in their manual a small car that they "said " was advisable that could tow was 2013, it was in my Elantra GT 1.8 liter 1,250 tow capacity. In 2014 when the Elantra GT high hp 2.0 liter came out "not recommended". I had a small boat with the Elantra under that weight and it tow locally ok and I was not worried about transmission issues . Distance towing is another matter to consider.

This "not recommended" does not mean "NO", it means as a manufacture we "discourage" it. It could be said this "not recommended" is a North American automotive conspiracy, when CLEARLY Europe and other countries have the same exact car towing trailers just fine, and the weight specs are in their manuals. And with the advent of "World Cars" by these manufactures, they can't say they a different cars like they could 20 years ago, they are the exact same cars, with only micro tweaks like suspension tuning for different geographic location.

Just to preface so you know where I am coming from to the ton new people here, I owned a hobby Audi repair shop and also now work as a maintenance guy at a mid sized print shop and work with oil analysis and work with high end synthetic industrial oils. I even went up against the worlds largest rotary screw air compressor company to prove to them their OEM oil is sub par at best and varnishes up their own compressors with testing and working with oil engineers and R&D oil engineers to prove my case. One of those is a retire Allison automatic transmission engineer who is known as the godfather of the Allison trans, who I have picked is brain on many occasions since he is an oil engineer and an automatic transmission engineer too. So while I am not an expert or even close, I have some knowledge in this area.

My personal opinion is some of the reasoning is because by using that verbiage they will discourage a high percentage of users to not tow and have a small decrease in warranty issue that are inevitable, be it from over loading, incorrect use of an untrained driver towing with an overdrive transmission, lack of proper maintenance from the owner when using the car in a "rough service" scenario, and of course law suits they would get dragged into.

All my vehicles get Redline high performance oils, they did at 2,000 miles of life. Let me digress for a moment here. I will bring it up again here to some of you that have AWD as I have a full write up a couple of times here on this site. Change out your oil in your rear differential at 5,000 miles to get rid of all the (large amount) AWD clutch pack break-in material that is there early on, in a minuscule of rear diff oil of about a hair over a 1/2 quart/1/2 liter of oil. We are talking high abrasiveness beating up your rear diff bearings. Then change it every 30,000 miles after. This is with all brand named manufactures with AWD clutch packs in the rear IE Toyota, Audi , Subaru ect.... And NO, don't believe the Hyundai service manager or order writers that are 110% clueless on this matter. Find my posts on this subject.

The big thing in towing with a small car is you have to use manual mode, or sport mode if you have a DCT or regular auto trans ATF using trans as NOT to use the overdrive gearing that will fail early from towing use. I only have some knowledge with Hyundai's DCT trans and not with the Kona's 2.0 liter trans car, but I did tow with the Elantra GT ATF pumping trans which is close to the 2.0 trans I would guess.

I always run Redline trans oil since it can take far more heat before breaking down then the OEM trans oil, so right there you are far a head on adding longevity to the transmission being a manual, DCT which is a computer controlled manual trans that is acting like a auto trans and the regular ATF pumping, torque convertor conventional automatic transmission most of you know of.

Brakes are the big issue here too, The AWD Kona 1.6T brakes are big so it handles towing well with trailers with no brakes that almost 100% of us will be doing because of North American trailering norms. If you tow, keep brakes at 100% non rusting in the brakes swept area. The rear side of the brake rotor ALWAYS rusts out first and more aggressively. If you tow, it is up to you to have brakes at 100% with anything above a tiny little micro utility trailer. In the rust belt, that means checking the back side of your brake rotors twice a season after year 2 of your new car. They can go that fast here in the winter salt belt. Not taking your brakes health rating seriously is very stupid and will endanger you and some else's family. After market "slotted" rotors help too, skip the drilled rotors since they can heat cycle crack. Cryo frozen rotors last a lot longer in salty conditions, so that would be another option too.

I will use the example of my Kona AWD 1.6T DCT which can not by any means correlate to the Kona 2.0 non turbo. I will also use my wife's 2014 Toyota Rav4 AWD that has a AFT pumper trans and the same AWD rear diff setup as the Kona, that is closer to what I think you would have to do with the 2.0 liter Hyundai non turbo car in towing use. I tow in sport mode in the Kona all the time. Sport mode doesn't let you go into 7th gear. 7th gear in my opinion is off limits for any kind of towing. You can feel that the "load" is easier on the trans when using AWD in sport mode since it is my opinion that the Kona AWD DCT is just like the Rav4 that when that is in sport mode has 95% front to 5% rear power output. There is some form of this in the Kona's sport mode, at what percentage is not known. The Rav4 has a documented percentage. If I am going up a hill or long grade of any size I go into manual mode and go into 5th gear. I stay between 2,750 to 3,750 rpm while on the hwy. You do not want to lug and extended high rpm under or at 4,000 wont hurt your motor.

The Rav4 while towing 1,2,00 lbs micro tent camper we use in manual mode and set it for 4th gear max. So in the Rav4 manual mode it runs the same up to 4th gear where it stays as a max gear. We use 4th gear up to 70 mph and hit 5th on flat cool 75 mph max speed we go. 6th/OD gear is never used. On any hill or long grade up we downshift to 4th. the engine is at 3,750-3,800 rpm in 4th at 70mph. SO we are in 4th on hot summer days 70% of the time and when cooler below 70 deg we can get by with more 5th because of the added power it just pulls better. And of course I only tow with premium with both cars. Even though the Kona get 93 octane 90% of the time since my LSPI event. I disagree with Hyundai on 87 octane on ANY turbo in any form of rough service of sport driving. . 89 octane should the minimum. But that just me on late model Hyundai turbo motors with 10:1 compression getting full boost at 17lbs at 1,375 rpm. That why they stumble and cough because they DETUNED it SO MUCH for 87 octane on full boost. You don't see that on German cars , you pay to play and they mandate 91 octane minimum.

If you use a small utility trailer that doesn't exceed 500-700 lbs in loaded running weight nothing needs to be done, just tow it. If your pushing 1000lbs +, you need to concern yourself with adding cooling/and maybe better trans oil, unless you a way to monitor your temp numbers. I still need to get a temp on my DCT oil when towing to see where I am at. Adding a DCT cooler would involve adding an oil pump to the cooler pathway.

Then a smart move (if needed) would be to add a transmission cooler to aid in fluid cooling which is very easy to do with a ATF conventional trans and install it to it with it coming from the transmission to the radiator cooler and then exiting from the radiator cooler then you install the external cooler there in the flow path. Then it exits from the external cooler back into the transmission to dump into the trans oil pan to start the cycle again. Pulling the trans lines to the radiator and seeing which shoots oil out is the way to find out your flow path, again the external cooler goes after the radiator cooler. I did this with my wife's Rav4 since that car towed our boat and now tows a micro light tent trailer. That car has Redline D6 ATF in it, as Toyota WS is a horrible ATF fluid as a semi-synthetic and can't take ANY rough service without an external added cooler like all the Toyota trucks have on it. In my opinion Hyundai's latest AFT fluid is far superior to WS, so that is comforting to see. And Hyundai uses a radiator to cool it where the Rav4 up to model year 2018 has a hockey puck sized oil heater that can't cool the trans fluid with such a small micro cooler and short time for the fluid to interface with it. Sorry. I digress.

If you tow, you need to go by the 'rough service " guide on oil change in the manual or LESS in some cases. Since I tow and sport drive my car I use high end synthetic oils like Redline and I would also us Amsoil in the driveline exclusively. Both have a fantastic track records on and off the track and for long haul vehicles. I use the recommended oils in the rear diff but have changed the DCT trans that has the front differential in it to a more robust viscosity that Hyundai used and approved BEFORE the big push for thin fuel economy viscosity oils. That being going from a 70w-75 Gl-4 rated oil that by the way Redline has and most all others don't. So you guys and gals want a better oil the Hyundai's cheap semi-synthetic oil that makes them money and gets them past warranty , you have an option for a full synthetic oil that is speced for the Hyundai with this Redline oil and keeps warranty spec for USA customers. Canada owners you don't have the Magnuson-Moss Warranty Act so you are on your own. That being said, they would NEVER find out you have Redline in so you never bring it up you change it out, they are so use to no one changing fluids that it is never brought up. They seem discourage early driveline oil changes out of pure stupidity.

DCT /front diff since they are in the same cavity and use the same oil and must be GL-4 rated.




Rear diff that that has the AWD clutch packs is a GL-5 rated unit. Also this is used in the Kona's transfer case that doesnt need changing till 30,000 40,000 since it is not as hard on the oil in that unit. GL-5 rated oil there too.

 

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I am in the US, and in my Kona's handbook it says "not recommended for towing" (on 2 seperate pages). I know there are hitches available for my car (200 lb tongue/2k lb tow). I have searched here, online, in my handbook, on Hyundai's site... and can find NOTHING that tells me what my SE could actually tow. Most of the info I have found has been Australian tow specs (we don't have the model/transmission options they do) which don't help me 1 bit. Anyone have a clue about any of this, or where I can look that I haven't already tried? tyia 馃槉
Here鈥檚 a guide to towing capacities from Aus not specific to any manufacturer, but I give no guarantees that towing will not damage your car. It鈥檚 for the Kona Electric which is more contentious than ICE Konas. Road rules vary from state to state, but are all generally in accordance with the following from New South Wales. Basically towing weight is limited to same weight as tow vehicle unless trailer has brakes. Trailers with brakes are limited to one and a half times weight of tow vehicle.

Technically it鈥檚 illegal to tow if manufacturer has specified a towing capacity of zero. BUT if it is simply 鈥渘ot recommended鈥 and the manufacturer has not recommended a maximum towing capacity, the NSW road rules say this about vehicle to trailer towing weight ratios:
"The loaded mass of the trailer must not exceed the lesser of:
鈥 Rated capacity of the towbar and tow coupling.
鈥 Maximum towing capacity of the vehicle.
鈥 Maximum carrying capacity of the trailer.
鈥 Maximum rated carrying capacity of the tyres."
But they go on to say
"If the vehicle manufacturer has not speci铿乪d the maximum towing mass, the maximum towing mass is:
鈥 One and a half times the unladen mass of the towing vehicle, provided that the trailer is 铿乼ted with brakes which are connected and in working order, or
鈥 The unladen mass of the towing vehicle if the trailer does not require brakes."
(https://www.rms.nsw.gov.au/roads/safety-rules/road-rules/towing.html)

I have taken this from a blog on Kona EV towing at: http://mychangingclimate.blogspot.com/2019/06/can-i-tow-with-ev.html
 

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They have have not stated 鈥 zero鈥 they stated 鈥 not recommended鈥 Legally 鈥 not recommend鈥 does NOT mean 鈥 zero鈥 鈥 not recommended鈥 is technically a 鈥 discouraging鈥 word by definition.
 

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The last year Hyundai posted in their manual a small car that they "said " was advisable that could tow was 2013, it was in my Elantra GT 1.8 liter 1,250 tow capacity. In 2014 when the Elantra GT high hp 2.0 liter came out "not recommended". I had a small boat with the Elantra under that weight and it tow locally ok and I was not worried about transmission issues . Distance towing is another matter to consider.

This "not recommended" does not mean "NO", it means as a manufacture we "discourage" it. It could be said this "not recommended" is a North American automotive conspiracy, when CLEARLY Europe and other countries have the same exact car towing trailers just fine, and the weight specs are in their manuals. And with the advent of "World Cars" by these manufactures, they can't say they a different cars like they could 20 years ago, they are the exact same cars, with only micro tweaks like suspension tuning for different geographic location.

Just to preface so you know where I am coming from to the ton new people here, I owned a hobby Audi repair shop and also now work as a maintenance guy at a mid sized print shop and work with oil analysis and work with high end synthetic industrial oils. I even went up against the worlds largest rotary screw air compressor company to prove to them their OEM oil is sub par at best and varnishes up their own compressors with testing and working with oil engineers and R&D oil engineers to prove my case. One of those is a retire Allison automatic transmission engineer who is known as the godfather of the Allison trans, who I have picked is brain on many occasions since he is an oil engineer and an automatic transmission engineer too. So while I am not an expert or even close, I have some knowledge in this area.

My personal opinion is some of the reasoning is because by using that verbiage they will discourage a high percentage of users to not tow and have a small decrease in warranty issue that are inevitable, be it from over loading, incorrect use of an untrained driver towing with an overdrive transmission, lack of proper maintenance from the owner when using the car in a "rough service" scenario, and of course law suits they would get dragged into.

All my vehicles get Redline high performance oils, they did at 2,000 miles of life. Let me digress for a moment here. I will bring it up again here to some of you that have AWD as I have a full write up a couple of times here on this site. Change out your oil in your rear differential at 5,000 miles to get rid of all the (large amount) AWD clutch pack break-in material that is there early on, in a minuscule of rear diff oil of about a hair over a 1/2 quart/1/2 liter of oil. We are talking high abrasiveness beating up your rear diff bearings. Then change it every 30,000 miles after. This is with all brand named manufactures with AWD clutch packs in the rear IE Toyota, Audi , Subaru ect.... And NO, don't believe the Hyundai service manager or order writers that are 110% clueless on this matter. Find my posts on this subject.

The big thing in towing with a small car is you have to use manual mode, or sport mode if you have a DCT or regular auto trans ATF using trans as NOT to use the overdrive gearing that will fail early from towing use. I only have some knowledge with Hyundai's DCT trans and not with the Kona's 2.0 liter trans car, but I did tow with the Elantra GT ATF pumping trans which is close to the 2.0 trans I would guess.

I always run Redline trans oil since it can take far more heat before breaking down then the OEM trans oil, so right there you are far a head on adding longevity to the transmission being a manual, DCT which is a computer controlled manual trans that is acting like a auto trans and the regular ATF pumping, torque convertor conventional automatic transmission most of you know of.

Brakes are the big issue here too, The AWD Kona 1.6T brakes are big so it handles towing well with trailers with no brakes that almost 100% of us will be doing because of North American trailering norms. If you tow, keep brakes at 100% non rusting in the brakes swept area. The rear side of the brake rotor ALWAYS rusts out first and more aggressively. If you tow, it is up to you to have brakes at 100% with anything above a tiny little micro utility trailer. In the rust belt, that means checking the back side of your brake rotors twice a season after year 2 of your new car. They can go that fast here in the winter salt belt. Not taking your brakes health rating seriously is very stupid and will endanger you and some else's family. After market "slotted" rotors help too, skip the drilled rotors since they can heat cycle crack. Cryo frozen rotors last a lot longer in salty conditions, so that would be another option too.

I will use the example of my Kona AWD 1.6T DCT which can not by any means correlate to the Kona 2.0 non turbo. I will also use my wife's 2014 Toyota Rav4 AWD that has a AFT pumper trans and the same AWD rear diff setup as the Kona, that is closer to what I think you would have to do with the 2.0 liter Hyundai non turbo car in towing use. I tow in sport mode in the Kona all the time. Sport mode doesn't let you go into 7th gear. 7th gear in my opinion is off limits for any kind of towing. You can feel that the "load" is easier on the trans when using AWD in sport mode since it is my opinion that the Kona AWD DCT is just like the Rav4 that when that is in sport mode has 95% front to 5% rear power output. There is some form of this in the Kona's sport mode, at what percentage is not known. The Rav4 has a documented percentage. If I am going up a hill or long grade of any size I go into manual mode and go into 5th gear. I stay between 2,750 to 3,750 rpm while on the hwy. You do not want to lug and extended high rpm under or at 4,000 wont hurt your motor.

The Rav4 while towing 1,2,00 lbs micro tent camper we use in manual mode and set it for 4th gear max. So in the Rav4 manual mode it runs the same up to 4th gear where it stays as a max gear. We use 4th gear up to 70 mph and hit 5th on flat cool 75 mph max speed we go. 6th/OD gear is never used. On any hill or long grade up we downshift to 4th. the engine is at 3,750-3,800 rpm in 4th at 70mph. SO we are in 4th on hot summer days 70% of the time and when cooler below 70 deg we can get by with more 5th because of the added power it just pulls better. And of course I only tow with premium with both cars. Even though the Kona get 93 octane 90% of the time since my LSPI event. I disagree with Hyundai on 87 octane on ANY turbo in any form of rough service of sport driving. . 89 octane should the minimum. But that just me on late model Hyundai turbo motors with 10:1 compression getting full boost at 17lbs at 1,375 rpm. That why they stumble and cough because they DETUNED it SO MUCH for 87 octane on full boost. You don't see that on German cars , you pay to play and they mandate 91 octane minimum.

If you use a small utility trailer that doesn't exceed 500-700 lbs in loaded running weight nothing needs to be done, just tow it. If your pushing 1000lbs +, you need to concern yourself with adding cooling/and maybe better trans oil, unless you a way to monitor your temp numbers. I still need to get a temp on my DCT oil when towing to see where I am at. Adding a DCT cooler would involve adding an oil pump to the cooler pathway.

Then a smart move (if needed) would be to add a transmission cooler to aid in fluid cooling which is very easy to do with a ATF conventional trans and install it to it with it coming from the transmission to the radiator cooler and then exiting from the radiator cooler then you install the external cooler there in the flow path. Then it exits from the external cooler back into the transmission to dump into the trans oil pan to start the cycle again. Pulling the trans lines to the radiator and seeing which shoots oil out is the way to find out your flow path, again the external cooler goes after the radiator cooler. I did this with my wife's Rav4 since that car towed our boat and now tows a micro light tent trailer. That car has Redline D6 ATF in it, as Toyota WS is a horrible ATF fluid as a semi-synthetic and can't take ANY rough service without an external added cooler like all the Toyota trucks have on it. In my opinion Hyundai's latest AFT fluid is far superior to WS, so that is comforting to see. And Hyundai uses a radiator to cool it where the Rav4 up to model year 2018 has a hockey puck sized oil heater that can't cool the trans fluid with such a small micro cooler and short time for the fluid to interface with it. Sorry. I digress.

If you tow, you need to go by the 'rough service " guide on oil change in the manual or LESS in some cases. Since I tow and sport drive my car I use high end synthetic oils like Redline and I would also us Amsoil in the driveline exclusively. Both have a fantastic track records on and off the track and for long haul vehicles. I use the recommended oils in the rear diff but have changed the DCT trans that has the front differential in it to a more robust viscosity that Hyundai used and approved BEFORE the big push for thin fuel economy viscosity oils. That being going from a 70w-75 Gl-4 rated oil that by the way Redline has and most all others don't. So you guys and gals want a better oil the Hyundai's cheap semi-synthetic oil that makes them money and gets them past warranty , you have an option for a full synthetic oil that is speced for the Hyundai with this Redline oil and keeps warranty spec for USA customers. Canada owners you don't have the Magnuson-Moss Warranty Act so you are on your own. That being said, they would NEVER find out you have Redline in so you never bring it up you change it out, they are so use to no one changing fluids that it is never brought up. They seem discourage early driveline oil changes out of pure stupidity.

DCT /front diff since they are in the same cavity and use the same oil and must be GL-4 rated.




Rear diff that that has the AWD clutch packs is a GL-5 rated unit. Also this is used in the Kona's transfer case that doesnt need changing till 30,000 40,000 since it is not as hard on the oil in that unit. GL-5 rated oil there too.

Hi! What's the deal with the 2.0l, SEL model AWD regarding front diff? Is the ATF the same on this model or is there a separate cavity, gear fluid drain/fill for fluid? I am getting the GL-5 for my rear diff from redline (75W90 pt# 57904 ) and am going to change it out around 3k miles, but what about the front diff?

When I had the old outback, there was a separate center/front diff that needed GL-4 oil, but i haven't discovered what's in the front on my Kona. I know you have the turbo, GDI model. Any help appreciated.-Wayne
 

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It comes down to the load that the frame of the vehicle can support at the rear. If there is not reinforcement with a unibody carriage then a load with a hitch can break loose and kill someone. If you want to tow then buy a vehicle that is designed for towing like a Subaru Outback for example.
 

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It comes down to the load that the frame of the vehicle can support at the rear. If there is not reinforcement with a unibody carriage then a load with a hitch can break loose and kill someone. If you want to tow then buy a vehicle that is designed for towing like a Subaru Outback for example.
They are designed to tow, and that exact car is rated in Europe and Asia. The 2018 Kona AWD 1.6T is rated to tow 2,800 lbs in Europe and Asia. The Kona is a "world car" so you get the same car as the over seas counties get with the exception of small tweaks of say suspension to match the roads in the country of delivery.
 

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I am in the US, and in my Kona's handbook it says "not recommended for towing" (on 2 seperate pages). I know there are hitches available for my car (200 lb tongue/2k lb tow). I have searched here, online, in my handbook, on Hyundai's site... and can find NOTHING that tells me what my SE could actually tow. Most of the info I have found has been Australian tow specs (we don't have the model/transmission options they do) which don't help me 1 bit. Anyone have a clue about any of this, or where I can look that I haven't already tried? tyia 馃槉
The last year Hyundai posted trailering specs was 2013 and my 1.8 liter auto trans Elantra GT speced at 1,250 lbs like all the other cars seamed to be speced at as kind of a standard before the North American automotive towing conspiracy scheme was put in place. See............., it's working. The FUD they put out, has 95% of you scared to tow. And all without pulling towing completely. Just a couple of words changed your actions. When we go by the word " not recommended" "legally" it has not been banned from doing. Luckily we have Europe and Asia that do not have those words and we have "world cars" so it is the exact same car.
 

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They have have not stated 鈥 zero鈥 they stated 鈥 not recommended鈥 Legally 鈥 not recommend鈥 does NOT mean 鈥 zero鈥 鈥 not recommended鈥 is technically a 鈥 discouraging鈥 word by definition.
This is technically true but nobody really knows what it means relative to the warranty on the car. Does it mean Hyundai will consider "normal" tow related failures to be covered? Or does it not? Nobody knows that and so the safe response to "can the Kona tow" is that owners need to understand we are in a gray area on that subject. I fully agree that the car sold in the US is the same as the tow rated versions sold in Europe and Asia.
 

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This is technically true but nobody really knows what it means relative to the warranty on the car. Does it mean Hyundai will consider "normal" tow related failures to be covered? Or does it not? Nobody knows that and so the safe response to "can the Kona tow" is that owners need to understand we are in a gray area on that subject. I fully agree that the car sold in the US is the same as the tow rated versions sold in Europe and Asia.
You must look at those words in a "legal " way and that will answer your question. If they wanted to stop towing 100% they would write "towing voids the warranty of your transmission" in place of "not recommended".

Meaning:

What does do not recommend mean?
It implies that doing the thing would be bad or incorrect. "I don't recommend" means that you're not in favor of taking the action, but you're not taking a stand against it, either.

You will never find your answer. They will come back saying "not recommended" You then have to look at it in a legal definition way, and there is your answer.

Hyundai has stated what does void warranty, like they do now, on using your Hyundai car in a race event of any kind. There they have shown what a true ban or warranty voiding "action" is. They have also stated that they "DO warranty Hyundai N models at local track day events.


So here we see defined things that void warranty. Cut and dry "this will void your warranty". You also see "Hyundai's use or verbiage" on "how" they void warranties in writing and through a voiding warranty scenario in writing. I see nothing in anyway like this for towing other then "not recommended". So welcome to the North American small car towing conspiracy.

USA customers have the Magnusen-Moss Warranty Act that will help them on this issue since if they try to void your trans on towing they will have to prove it was the towing that did the damage in court if they choose to take it there. Which they won't because they have scared away 95% of towing and a high number of those who will tow will be so hyper sensitive to not over loading, there will almost never be a trans issue that could be proven to be the failure point. The micro people who will over tow will be ever so small they will just replace it because court costs and time getting a case will be not worth the expenditure of fighting it.

So there, you have nothing to go by, ambiguous as planned. A brilliant move by some smart guy or group and taken on by every North American car manufacture to scare 95% plus of people who wanted to tow with their car. Your only choice is................A) Are you a fighter and will tow because you still see you have a legal right as a legal laymen or B) you are not a fighter or risk taker and will not risk a fight or a transmission rebuild cost to your pocket book. Choose A or choose B.

.
 

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Too much to read but basically in the US we have the 7 speed dual clutch, these have not held up well to tow tests or excessive off roading where AWD tires are slipping as you will get a transmission overheat warning.
 

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Too much to read but basically in the US we have the 7 speed dual clutch, these have not held up well to tow tests or excessive off roading where AWD tires are slipping as you will get a transmission overheat warning.
You have a source for this information? This is the same DCT they are using around the rest of the world including the countries listed above that it is tow rated.
 

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Too much to read but basically in the US we have the 7 speed dual clutch, these have not held up well to tow tests or excessive off roading where AWD tires are slipping as you will get a transmission overheat warning.
Towing in the 7 speed DCT is not that hard on the clutch. Sport driving is very hard on it and even worse is non momentum off roading or clutch loading off roading. I have towed in bumper to bumper traffic trying to get out of town for the holidays in stop and go traffic that lasts for 30-40 mins and I have never had a clutch warning light. I was surprised how well the DCT does at towing. The computer does a fantastic job at quick and a well balanced engagement of the clutch IF the driver gets his or her timing down of how fast to accelerate while the engagement is happening. The driver needs to use manual mode to stay in 1st or 2nd gear as not to keep going up and down through the gears within seconds.
 

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You have a source for this information? This is the same DCT they are using around the rest of the world including the countries listed above that it is tow rated.
It would appear to me that the US has stricter safety regulations and guidlines with regard to towing, My 2019 Kia Sportage SX turbo with 6 speed trans (not dual clutch) was rated here in the US to tow a maximum of 1650 lbs. The SX was heavier than the Kona and had 248 hp and 260lbs of torque. On paper this should have had a higher tow rating but in the owners manual although it stated not recommended for towing also, I saw that in Europe many Sportage owners with the same engine were towing campers with no problems ? So not too sure what this was all about? The Kona is much lighter and since I have spent some time under it checking it out, I will say that it is not that beefy compared to the Sportage. Most importantly just because they make a hitch for a vehicle and give the hitch a high rating does not mean the vehicle it is attached to can handle the hitches rating. From years of towing campers, trailers and boats with numerous vehicles here in the southwest, I would not recommend towing anything more than 800 lbs with a Kona.
 

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Hyundai makes the hitch that gave the Kona AWD 1.6T the 2,800 tow rating( Australia). Plus My Kona is lowered and has Eibach springs that were installed before the hitch. My braking is superior then an OEM Kona AWD1.6T since the OEM Kona has horrible (non) rear brake bias stock. Too soft of springs that give it a rear lift and nose dive braking personality that was so bad that I went all the way up the chain and hit Hyundai's wall of "WE DON"T CARE" When I installed the Eibachs it fixed 70% of the horrible rear (non) brake bias. There was just way too much weight transfer to the front. I think the Kona at least a re sprung Kona AWD 1.6T is a fantastic car to tow with, with it's big brakes. I have practice panic stops and was surprised how well it stopped with my boat. My Kona tows and brakes way better then my wife's 2014 Rav4 that is one segment up from the Kona and in the same segment as the Sportage.
 

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I used to tow a 26ft sailboat with a 4.3 litre V6 S-10 pickup, plenty of power stopped well, heavy frame no problem. Was it safe? I just think the Kona is too short, narrow and light to tow anything over 1000lbs. The unit body and light weight undercarriage looks pretty weak to me. Good Luck :)
 

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I have 2019 Kona 2.0L Luxury in Canada.
My old 2010 3.5L Santa Fe didnt pass inspection, and I came to the conclusion I rarely use it, not justified to keep repairing and pay upkeep for few more years (When I plan to swap for a Cybertruck).

The thing is I have 14.5 ft Aluminium boat with 50HP 2 cycle outboard I tow in the summer - not far, about 40 mins driving to lakes.
Do you think the class 1 hitch can manage this? I am not sure sure on its weight, but I can lift the tongue of the trailer by hands, it's not more than 40kg.


IMG_20180827_175052.jpg
Do you think the Kona with class 1 hitch can handle that?
 

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I towed about the same sized boat and weight with a 2013 Hyundai Elantra GT with a 1.8 liter. Go in sport mode and manual mode and keep out of 5th and 6th gear and you will be fine. Run 37 psi cold air pressure in all 4 tires.
 
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