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For those new to the Forum or the Kona, Be aware that very cold weather conditions can allow fuel and moisture to build up in the oil pan due to longer periods of the engine running a rich air/fuel mixture. This condition allows fuel to seep past the rings and can actually cause your oil pan to overfill with fuel and the engine not getting hot enough to burn off the condensation internally. Avoid short runs and allow the engine and drivetrain to reach normal operating temps..
Use the search feature for more threads on this subject.. Keep Warm!
 

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I came to the kona boards to get away from OD discussion at the CRV boards .Genuinely feel bad for anyone experiencing this .

at least the kona has a naturally aspirated engine trim to choose from though
 

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My commutes are 30+ minutes on highway. The gas still gets into the oil.
still might not be enough in cold weather to burn off contaminants.. I noticed it’s takes longer to warm up this car than others i have owned.. highway driving is also more efficient and allows more airflow cooling.. I purposely drive it more aggressively in the cold to get temps higher.. Hyundai uses a wax pellet type thermostat.. They operate different I believe, all open or closed, no in between..
Have not seen as many complaints about oil levels rising Like there was last year ?
 

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still might not be enough in cold weather to burn off contaminants.. I noticed it’s takes longer to warm up this car than others i have owned.. highway driving is also more efficient and allows more airflow cooling.. I purposely drive it more aggressively in the cold to get temps higher.. Hyundai uses a wax pellet type thermostat.. They operate different I believe, all open or closed, no in between..
Have not seen as many complaints about oil levels rising Like there was last year ?
95% of all cars since the 1950's use the very common wax pellet type thermostat. As do all modern fire sprinklers.
 

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95% of all cars since the 1950's use the very common wax pellet type thermostat. As do all modern fire sprinklers.
I always assumed it was a bi-metal spring by its looks.. My bad..
 
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