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I'd be wary - chips are like 98% scams. No one has more advanced models and software for the engines than the OEM, and there are very good reasons that they program the ECU the way they do. I guarantee you the OEM is maximizing power and gas mileage with emissions regulations and reasonable reliability limits. If you change any of these factors, you are affecting all of them.

It is completely fair to feel that your desires from your car might not align with those of the market for which the car was built and tuned. Case in point - the Gamma turbo motor is the same as the one used in the Elantra GT Sport and others, and in those cars it is tuned to make 201hp vs the Kona's 175hp. And while you can absolutely change the tuning on your engine to focus on different priorities - more hp and less mpg, for example - its important to keep in mind that engine tuning is a very intensive and interconnected thing. You can absolutely squeeze more of something out of your motor, but it always comes as a tradeoff. Performance chip marketers that are telling you that you get more of everything (better mpg! more power! smoother ride! better reliability!), basically anything that sounds too good to be true, almost always is. OEM tuning is optimized.

I'm not discouraging modifying your tuning, just make sure you do a ton of research and testing before you fall victim to a scam.
 

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So following with what Wheat stated, I would do some deep searches in how chips are basically a take your money and leave you without any recourse. Chips only do one or two things to fool the ECU where as a proper tune takes everything into account , I can attest to that affect after having mine on the Dyno recently and to make note the these engines and to the tuners amazement how much hp/torque these engines do make , this was all stock. Also not that yes these are the same Gamma engines in Elantra's / Veloster the Turbo is mounted up top where as the others are mounted on the backside of the engine making this a new venture for most tuners.
Possible HP is close to 60 additional whp and up to 275 torque that would be a stage 1 tune , most would be cleaning up the rpm curve and giving the turbo a better cleaner boost curve also as these drop off at 4275 .

Again no chip will give you what they claim since most are not done on that specific vehicle just a flat out 1.6T/2.0T maybe but not on a dyno it would take them massive amount of hours and also who have a Kona for example to be R&D since these are so new on the market , mine being one of the very or only one so far as others are now catching up to this model since they want to cover the Hyundai market.
Keep in mind any tune requires certain mods to that being a intake/ new plugs/ exhaust to achieve what is desired to get the correct numbers and performance from said tune.
 

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Personally, I know the chip tunes are very generic for all such engines.

The Kona ECU coding has been deciphered but your best bet is to go with a PiggyBack ECU. There are a few available already and have been since 2017. There are also some tuners who are offering ECU tunes but I wouldn't do this. You are tampering with the actual programming of the ECU by modifying it. It can be detected by Hyundai thru their engine analyzer and software.

When you re-flash the ECU, it leaves a code finger print and is easily detected. With a piggyback ECU the signal is modified after the ECU and doesn't effect the OEM coding. You get the benefits of a specific tune and none of the negative issues as in; warranty problems with the dealer and Hyundai. You can remove the piggyback ECU before it goes in for service. Then reinstall after the service otherwise no harm, no foul. keeping in mind it modifies the original signals from the ECU no matter if it's updated by the dealer or not during a particular service.

They are completely safe and easy to install. I had one on my GLA 45 AMG. It made a gigantic difference. I could virtually outrun any stock Porsche 911 Carrera 4S and stay right with a stock 911 Turbo. It boosted power to over 400 whp, which was more than a 40% gain.

When you start messing with the coding within the ECU, your just asking for a denied warranty claim. Why, you've modified the actual brain of the vehicle and manufactures won't stand still or accept such modifications. Read your warranty and if you're still in doubt talk to your dealer service department. They will let you know quite quickly.

Mahalo!!:grin:
 
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