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Discussion Starter #21
As far as the Engine Light. Could just be the Gas Cap. Evap Code P0452. Light will come on if the Gas Cap is off with the engine running (Refueling for example). How is the engine running??
Seems like engine runs fine. I checked the gas cap. On tight.
 

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Discussion Starter #22
Thinking if the previous owner told the dealer about the oil consumption problem. If so, they have an obligation to tell you everything they know about the car. You should check with the young lady and see what she says. If so, then see if you can get her to sign a document declaring it. You can then ask the dealer if they knew. etc, etc, etc.
All of this is going to be time and effort. Engine oil analysis, setting up appointment with dealer to verify oil loss, repairs, lots of misery for a 2 yr old car that may have been poorly maintained or has engine defect. My 2019 Kona doesn't burn oil but i only have 6700 miles on it. If it were me, I would cut my loss and long agony of misery ahead, and look to dump it without taking too large a loss. Other choice is to keep it till 60k, then dump it, remembering to check the oil level constantly. Too much effort for me. Good Luck!
 

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The dealer has been very cooperative. They are doing an oil consumption test, which requires two more visits, changes, after driving 1000 miles. They said one of the cylinders was misfiring, why the check engine light was on. It’s a CPO car so I am comforted with the warranty. I hate to hassle the young woman who turned in the car after leasing it. Also, th dealer didn’t service the car for the 1st 20,000 miles.
 

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The dealer has been very cooperative. They are doing an oil consumption test, which requires two more visits, changes, after driving 1000 miles. They said one of the cylinders was misfiring, why the check engine light was on. It’s a CPO car so I am comforted with the warranty. I hate to hassle the young woman who turned in the car after leasing it. Also, th dealer didn’t service the car for the 1st 20,000 miles.
Well, they ultimately will have to repair/replace engine ($$$$). And here is the real fun, if you don't have receipts for oil changes with the appropriate mileage/time, Hyundai may say, "Sorry, this car was not maintained according to spec, therefore we can't help you!" I don't know how this will play out, however, experience tells me that you are going to have more work ahead then you may have bargained when you bought a 2 yr old car with 30k. If you have time for the long haul here, pursue it further. It looks like to me that it would be a lot easier to dump it now when you can get the max for it, b4 all of this maintenance/repair/ nightmare drops the trade-in value. (Lots of things affect trade-in I found out when I dumped my Veloster!) The dealer found out it had more than 2 previous owners, it was sold into fleet, and had a cosmetic accident on Carfax. Now, you also need to find out why the car was misfiring. So now you have 2 problems, maybe. I would dump it now!
 

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Gas caps have internal seals. They Keep gas fumes inside the tank. And only open to let air in. The old ones were like lawnmower gas caps. With pinholes to prevent a vacuum inside the tank.
 

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You mention it was a CPO dealer sale. In this case, it does not matter what sort of maintenance the car had before you purchased it. CPO means they claim to have done an extensive
set of checks, and when they sold you the car, allegedly all those checks results were A-OK. Now in reality they probably did not do any of those checks, and it is probably provable based on the engine's condition that they have known , or should have known about the issue(s) . You have the extra ace in your hand that you have contact with the previous owner, who apparently had trouble with oil consumption already.

What you did since you bought it theoretically matters, e.g. if you never did an oil change and there was one needed they could possibly pin it on you, although it is highly unlikely.
The most likely outcome, they honor the CPO warranty and replace the engine F.O.C for you. In fact if they ask you to pitch in any money, you should insist that they just honor the warranty, this is 100% on them. (Sometimes they try to make a deal, like offer to pay for half of the cost of the repair necessary, you pick up the rest)

I really do not expect them to risk trouble and to give too much heartache in this case. If the previous owner complained about the issue or had any related service records indicating complaints, I do not expect they would top this off by trying to cover that up, and those records would surely come out if there was a lawsuit or customer protection investigation by an overseeing agency, such as the state Attorney General's office.

Clearly they sold you a car promising it was in an excellent condition and it provably was not. It is simplest for them to give you a new engine, and call it a day. While they are doing it, they should give you a loaner, so that will really not be to much hassle for you.
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Just read through the thread again.... You only had the car for 6 weeks, and the previous oil change was 7 weeks ago per carfax. Drove 570 miles total, when the check engine light (not the maintenance required light) came on. The dealer since read out the check engine light fault code, and it was not caused by "low oil", we know now it was a cylinder misfire code.

The engine light made you check the oil level, noticed it was at the low mark, and you added a quart, bringing it up to the high mark (which was the right thing to do)
It looks to me the car has an excessive oil consumption problem. I expect you are fully covered for this problem under the CPO warranty. Clearly, nobody can fault you for any of this.

The Hyundai dealer's observation of the oil level under controlled conditions is the common prelude to an engine replacement. They have to document how much oil the engine is consuming, before Hyundai approves a warranty engine replacement.

BTW did they fix the misfire and reset the check engine light?
 

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Discussion Starter #28
Well, they ultimately will have to repair/replace engine ($$$$). And here is the real fun, if you don't have receipts for oil changes with the appropriate mileage/time, Hyundai may say, "Sorry, this car was not maintained according to spec, therefore we can't help you!" I don't know how this will play out, however, experience tells me that you are going to have more work ahead then you may have bargained when you bought a 2 yr old car with 30k. If you have time for the long haul here, pursue it further. It looks like to me that it would be a lot easier to dump it now when you can get the max for it, b4 all of this maintenance/repair/ nightmare drops the trade-in value. (Lots of things affect trade-in I found out when I dumped my Veloster!) The dealer found out it had more than 2 previous owners, it was sold into fleet, and had a cosmetic accident on Carfax. Now, you also need to find out why the car was misfiring. So now you have 2 problems, maybe. I would dump it now!
Thanks.. I JUST got the car in November and drove it 500 miles, so I didn’t even have the chance to change the oil and the engine light came on. I have faith they’ll take care of it in the end ; possibly with new engine if this keeps reoccurring. I appreciate your feedback too.
 

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Discussion Starter #29
Thanks.. I JUST got the car in November and drove it 500 miles, so I didn’t even have the chance to change the oil and the engine light came on. I have faith they’ll take care of it in the end ; possibly with new engine if this keeps reoccurring. I appreciate your feedback too.
Also, in good conscience, I couldn’t sell the car knowing what I know. I’d be more inclined to invoke lemon law rules, if it is not resolved. I have to give them a chance to resolve it.
 

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So bummed. I’ve had my 2019 kona with 30,700 miles for 6 weeks. Check engine light came on and oil level was very low. I put in more oil and light is still on. I bought it certified from a dealer, but communicated with the previous owner who said, make sure you ad oil every 2000 miles! I’ve driven the car 570 miles in two months. Anyone else have a similar oil issue?
In case light is still "on" after you add oil to the correct level it means that your oil level or oil pressure sensor is stucked because it was dry when oil level was low. Replace the sensor or pull it out and try to clean it with a suitable solvent.
In any case, you have to check oil level every 5,000 miles. If your car is equipped with a turbo charged engine, it will consume more oil thn a non turbo car. In this case, a special oil is required and you should consult you dealer which type.
 

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I think the poster was referring to 2 different problems. Engine Light and Low Oil.
 
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Keep in mind there are 2 lights: "Maintenance required" (MIL) and "Check Engine" (CEL) . AFAIK Neither would come on because of low oil level.
Maybe The CEL would come on if the oil pressure is very low, although I have never seen it do that.
(Certainly not if the oil level is just at the low mark on the dip stick). MIL is a simple oil change reminder, it comes on if enough time, or enough miles
accumulated since the last oil change. That would not light up on low oil level either.

We know from the OP that In this case it was the CEL, which lit up because of a cylinder misfire. This was coincidental to the low oil level.
The oil level was not low enough to cause any engine malfunction, or low oil pressure, it is cause for concern because the car consumed
over a quart of oil in a 500-ish miles.

Replacing the oil pressure sensor is fairly difficult, and in this case, unlikely to be necessary/useful.
Given that the car is under CPO warranty, it would be ill advised to try any speculative DIY fix.
It makes the most sense to let the dealer figure it out the cause of the excessive oil consumption
 

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Keep in mind there are 2 lights: "Maintenance required" (MIL) and "Check Engine" (CEL) . AFAIK Neither would come on because of low oil level.
Maybe The CEL would come on if the oil pressure is very low, although I have never seen it do that.
(Certainly not if the oil level is just at the low mark on the dip stick). MIL is a simple oil change reminder, it comes on if enough time, or enough miles
accumulated since the last oil change. That would not light up on low oil level either.

We know from the OP that In this case it was the CEL, which lit up because of a cylinder misfire. This was coincidental to the low oil level.
The oil level was not low enough to cause any engine malfunction, or low oil pressure, it is cause for concern because the car consumed
over a quart of oil in a 500-ish miles.

Replacing the oil pressure sensor is fairly difficult, and in this case, unlikely to be necessary/useful.
Given that the car is under CPO warranty, it would be ill advised to try any speculative DIY fix.
It makes the most sense to let the dealer figure it out the cause of the excessive oil consumption
I think the poster was referring to 2 different problems. Engine Light and Low Oil.
 

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Discussion Starter #34
You mention it was a CPO dealer sale. In this case, it does not matter what sort of maintenance the car had before you purchased it. CPO means they claim to have done an extensive
set of checks, and when they sold you the car, allegedly all those checks results were A-OK. Now in reality they probably did not do any of those checks, and it is probably provable based on the engine's condition that they have known , or should have known about the issue(s) . You have the extra ace in your hand that you have contact with the previous owner, who apparently had trouble with oil consumption already.

What you did since you bought it theoretically matters, e.g. if you never did an oil change and there was one needed they could possibly pin it on you, although it is highly unlikely.
The most likely outcome, they honor the CPO warranty and replace the engine F.O.C for you. In fact if they ask you to pitch in any money, you should insist that they just honor the warranty, this is 100% on them. (Sometimes they try to make a deal, like offer to pay for half of the cost of the repair necessary, you pick up the rest)

I really do not expect them to risk trouble and to give too much heartache in this case. If the previous owner complained about the issue or had any related service records indicating complaints, I do not expect they would top this off by trying to cover that up, and those records would surely come out if there was a lawsuit or customer protection investigation by an overseeing agency, such as the state Attorney General's office.

Clearly they sold you a car promising it was in an excellent condition and it provably was not. It is simplest for them to give you a new engine, and call it a day. While they are doing it, they should give you a loaner, so that will really not be to much hassle for you.
.
 

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Thanks for your thoughtful response. My mechanical abilities are very limited, I can add and did add a quart of oil, but that’s the extent of it. Weird, though. One quart took the line from low to full.
The Car-fax report showed oil changes starting at 24,000 miles, then 3 others to follow roughly 2000 miles apart, which is suspicious in retrospect. The previous owner left stuff in the glove compartment so that’s how I was able to contact her and I trust what she said. A young woman and I think it was her first car. I should have not problem with the warranty though when I bring it in on Monday (I hope). Only drove 570 miles in 6 weeks!
Hey there- just read your post. You may want to see my post regarding my new '20 Kona with the 2.0 engine, that developed a problem similar to yours after just 7500 miles. It seems there's an engine defect that has resulted in my car being in the shop for going on 6 weeks now, waiting for a new block / new engine to arrive and be installed. Good Luck!
 

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Discussion Starter #36
Hey there- just read your post. You may want to see my post regarding my new '20 Kona with the 2.0 engine, that developed a problem similar to yours after just 7500 miles. It seems there's an engine defect that has resulted in my car being in the shop for going on 6 weeks now, waiting for a new block / new engine to arrive and be installed. Good Luck!
Thanks for that. I did so much research prior to my purchase. consumer reports listed Hyundai as the 5th most reliable brand...drum roll....and Kona as the most reliable vehicle from the Hyundai lineup! I have to do two more “oil consumption “tests, each after 1000 miles so they can document it. ..even after I have the car fax records showing 3 oil changes over 4,ooo miles. Any ideas how to expedite this process?
 

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Keep an eye on the oil level. Given that last time you lost over a quart in the span of 560 miles, if you run it for 1000 miles, you may lose enough oil for the engine to seize up.
I think, if you drop down to the low mark. you need to call them and let them know, instead of waiting until you did drive 1000 miles. (They probably told you not to top of the oil so they can determine how much oil the car is consuming). There is not much you can do to speed up the process, you have to let them go through their process.
 

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The way this is going to go: When you are down to the low mark, call the dealer and let them know. ( It is not ok to operate the car when the oil level is below the low mark) .
At that point they will have you come in, record the consumption and top off the oil. In another 600 miles, repeat. So in all likelihood they will have their 2 measurements they want
in 1200 miles total. A that point they get the approval from Hyundai and order the new engine. ( Who knows, they may insist on the 2K miles observation window anyway,
in which case you have to visit 4 times).
The way it works, it is actually Hyundai that is footing the bill for the labor and the cost of the new engine.
This is actually good for the dealer, as long as the warranty repair is approved.
 
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