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Discussion Starter #1
Apparently, the Kona charging computer sends info to DCFC that it can accept up to 80 kW. However, Electrify America has a nearly tripling of the price if the car communicates it can accept over 75 kW. For the Kona, this makes it more expensive per mile than gasoline. If we could limit the Kona to a number under 75 kW, then the rapidly growing Electrify America network would be used more often by Kona EV owners. I met other EV drivers who also avoid using the EA chargers for the same reason. Any ideas from Hundai or auto hackers?
 

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Apparently, the Kona charging computer sends info to DCFC that it can accept up to 80 kW. However, Electrify America has a nearly tripling of the price if the car communicates it can accept over 75 kW. For the Kona, this makes it more expensive per mile than gasoline. If we could limit the Kona to a number under 75 kW, then the rapidly growing Electrify America network would be used more often by Kona EV owners. I met other EV drivers who also avoid using the EA chargers for the same reason. Any ideas from Hundai or auto hackers?
1st step would be to figure out how it communicates, and then adjust the response. However doing so would probably void your vehicle warranty and charge at a slower pace.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
1st step would be to figure out how it communicates, and then adjust the response. However doing so would probably void your vehicle warranty and charge at a slower pace.
Another 1st step would be to ask Hyundai to lower their max charge request to 74 kW, or provide a user settable maximum of 74 kW. I have never seen higher than 55 kW anyway on my US Kona, so why ask for 80?
 

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1st step would be to figure out how it communicates, and then adjust the response. However doing so would probably void your vehicle warranty and charge at a slower pace.
IMHO I think that’s getting it backwards. You are asking Hyundai to provide a setting that will retard charging in the rest of the world because there is a problem with one charging company in the USA. The problem is that EA has set an arbitrary doubling of the charging cost for cars at the 75kW threshold. Rather than ask that an international motor company change its specifications, how about asking/demanding your local (albeit huge) charging company be more sensible & make a relatively minor adjustment to their charging regime? Bearing in mind VW has already paid for the EA infrastructure as part of the punishment for their emissions scandal.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
IMHO I think that’s getting it backwards. You are asking Hyundai to provide a setting that will retard charging in the rest of the world because there is a problem with one charging company in the USA. The problem is that EA has set an arbitrary doubling of the charging cost for cars at the 75kW threshold. Rather than ask that an international motor company change its specifications, how about asking/demanding your local (albeit huge) charging company be more sensible & make a relatively minor adjustment to their charging regime? Bearing in mind VW has already paid for the EA infrastructure as part of the punishment for their emissions scandal.
Good idea, except I have never asked Hyundai to retard charging in the rest of the world. Hyundai has different configurations of many features based on the country the cars are sold into. Better idea would be to let the user select charge rate. If EA won't allow the user to select a setting, then allow car owner to set the max rate. Or, if Hyundai won't allow the owner to set a charge rate limit on the car that is more realistic, have EA allow a max charge rate setting in their app. Unfortunately, it appears that neither will budge in this tug of war so the car owner has to settle for a choice: Pay over $1 per kWh or charge elsewhere.
 

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I thought there was a setting you can make for charge rate, but not explicitly by kW - something like Maximum / Regular / Minimum?
 

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Discussion Starter #7
That would be a great idea, ACorvy. However, the only settings I have found in the car are how full the battery gets to before turning off the charge session. Any ideas where I can look?
 

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The car settings are only for L1 and L2 A/C charging. Fast chargers are DC, and there is no car setting to adjust that. The car will actually adjust incoming charge itself to protect the battery. It ramps down as the charge % gets higher. Unfortunately, though, the DC charging stations decide (based on the initial handshake with the car), what the max charging rate is for that car, and bill you accordingly. There is no way to control that from the car end.
 

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“ There is no way to control that from the car end.”

There is and it should be on the car’s end to allow the owner the most flexibility given the Wild West public charging situation. Tesla allows you set the incoming charge.
 

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“ There is no way to control that from the car end.”

There is and it should be on the car’s end to allow the owner the most flexibility given the Wild West public charging situation. Tesla allows you set the incoming charge.
Not for DC charging, just for L1 and L2 A/C, same as the Kona. However, Tesla has a higher max input and can charge faster than the Kona, if the DC charger is capable of more. The cars (Teslas and the Kona) all reduce their charge input as the battery reaches higher SOC %. This is to protect the battery.

The issue with the Kona and Electrify America is that while it's max rate is higher than 75kW, it normally doesn't charge higher than 60 kW (at least that is the most I have seen on mine). Good news though, for me, is that most of the fast chargers in my area are only 50kW (and are free). And 1/2 hour stop gives me plenty of charge (I don't fast charge over 80%) to carry on to my next rest break. I would refuse to charge at an EA charger, as it would cost me more than driving my ICE car.

For Tesla, it is actually a moot point, because they can't charge faster than 50kW on a CCS fast charger (with an adapter). They have to use their own Super Charger stations to get a higher fast charge.
 

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For Tesla, it is actually a moot point, because they can't charge faster than 50kW on a CCS fast charger (with an adapter).
Tesla’s can and do charge to 120kW on CCS adapters in EU Tesla and others. Model 3’s anyway, the S and X’s are not designed for CCS the way the Model 3.

Car controls the charge rate so no reason Hyundai could not offer a charge control to fit the public charging environment. It would make Kona’s EV’s worth more.
 

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Tesla’s can and do charge to 120kW on CCS adapters in EU Tesla and others. Model 3’s anyway, the S and X’s are not designed for CCS the way the Model 3.
Can't speak for the EU, but here they are limited to 50kW with the CCS adapter. My son has a Tesla Model 3 and had to pay over $600 CAD for his (bit cheaper now). Normally he uses the Tesla Super Chargers, but there they are not all over in BC, and so had to go for the adapter to have more flexibility to drive further and to more places. Also most of the DC fast chargers here are free, so that was another big incentive.
 

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My son has a Tesla Model 3 and had to pay over $600 CAD for his (bit cheaper now).
Do you mean the Chademo adapter which is $450US. Have not seen any news about Tesla selling a CCS adapter outside of the EU. They don’t sell a CCS adapter for the Model 3 in the EU because the Model 3 comes with CCS socket and can take up to 250kW charge on it.

If Tesla is selling CCS adapters in Canada, I’ll be driving to Vancouver next weekend to get one.
 

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Do you mean the Chademo adapter which is $450US. Have not seen any news about Tesla selling a CCS adapter outside of the EU. They don’t sell a CCS adapter for the Model 3 in the EU because the Model 3 comes with CCS socket and can take up to 250kW charge on it.
If Tesla is selling CCS adapters in Canada, I’ll be driving to Vancouver next weekend to get one.
Sorry, you're right, I meant Chademo, which is why it is limited to 50kW. The fast chargers here (other than Super Chargers) all have both CCS (which the Kona uses) and Chademo. The Tesla Model 3s here do not have CCS sockets.

And yes, I know the EU is different, but not sure the details of how they do it over there.
 

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EA and EVgo usually have a Chademo/CCS plug on each machine so Kona EV should be able to charge at full 50kW of Chademo for the discount price of $0.18 a minute which would be 50kWh for $11. Cheaper than Tesla at $14. Using an hour of one’s time vs. 30 minutes but saving a lot on the EA EVgo chargers.
 

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EA and EVgo usually have a Chademo/CCS plug on each machine so Kona EV should be able to charge at full 50kW of Chademo for the discount price of $0.18 a minute which would be 50kWh for $11. Cheaper than Tesla at $14. Using an hour of one’s time vs. 30 minutes but saving a lot on the EA EVgo chargers.
Kona has only CCS socket for fast charging. I take it you don't own a Kona?
 
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