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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I was able to get through to the president of Hyundai Technical Center in Michigan and what appears to be a gentleman who is charge of car product planning. I was able to get through by voicemail, no response, of course. We need to lobby these guys. Most of us want an AWD Kona N NOT a 2WD Kona N. We need to get this across to them loud and clear. We need to get a large group of people together and get contact info and then we need to contact them all at once so they can't figure out a way to put a firewall up on the executives contacting pathway. Who's up for it??
 

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Mazda was able to cram their 2.5T into their boring CX30....hopefully Hyundai's engineer is up for the challenge. As for marketing, I'd focus on the wet clutch for the Kona N with 2.0T. Veloster has a 6MT for the diehards.

As a die-hard manual driver, I'd like a tuned multi-link setup in the base Elantra 6MT 2.0L...If those Hyundai engineers had any ability, they'd figure a way to make base Elantra 6MT drive as well as my current base 6MT Civic Sedan... I'm betting they can't, since Hyundai's regular 2.0L na engine is more suited for the Kona instead of a high-revving sport sedan.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Mazda was able to cram their 2.5T into their boring CX30....hopefully Hyundai's engineer is up for the challenge. As for marketing, I'd focus on the wet clutch for the Kona N with 2.0T. Veloster has a 6MT for the diehards.

As a die-hard manual driver, I'd like a tuned multi-link setup in the base Elantra 6MT 2.0L...If those Hyundai engineers had any ability, they'd figure a way to make base Elantra 6MT drive as well as my current base 6MT Civic Sedan... I'm betting they can't, since Hyundai's regular 2.0L na engine is more suited for the Kona instead of a high-revving sport sedan.
Everything is set in stone already, 2.0 liter 260-275 hp 2WD. There is a high likely they are building Asian and Europe Kona N's right now for early summer delivery. I had money down at the dealer and pulled it when I heard it was a 2WD car. Who the heii wants a LIFTED 2WD hot hatch, NOT ME.
 

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Give me an email address and I would in a heart beat. As someone who is really looking forward to what would be such a good entry level compact SUV, if it only comes as FWD, it would only serve to pushing me to tune the 1.6T I currently have, and not even waste time or effort test driving such a good platform backed by clearly out of touch designers.
 

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I bought a new 2013 Honda CRV AWD and it was extra maintenance and lower MPG. Sure there are some uses for it in cold and muddy climates, but the majority of drivers will never need it.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I bought a new 2013 Honda CRV AWD and it was extra maintenance and lower MPG. Sure there are some uses for it in cold and muddy climates, but the majority of drivers will never need it.
While not having Torsen diffs and being less sophisticated, Kona's AWD system is a game changer in the corners. I would own an AWD in the desert. Listen to the first 12 minutes. Maintenance is a $18 bottle of Redline 75w90 and 10 minutes a year for me, since I change the oil in my rear diff yearly and the transfer case every 2 years. An average drive rwill change their diff once in the life time of their car. Mileage I average 16 mpg in Minnesota winters ( I am a short trip who is on boost more then most) and 22 mpg in the summer. Mileage is a moot point for my car. I need it every time I start my car and drive it.


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Discussion Starter #8
Dealers are just sellers. Not influence over manufacturers.
It is the manufacture we are talking at, not the dealers. Talking to a dealers is equivalent to a guy sitting on a street corner waiting for a bus.
 

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It is the manufacture we are talking at, not the dealers. Talking to a dealers is equivalent to a guy sitting on a street corner waiting for a bus.
Unless the guy in Michigan was a Korean, he wasn’t in charge of squat nor will he be able to change mother country’s plans.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Unless the guy in Michigan was a Korean, he wasn’t in charge of squat nor will he be able to change mother country’s plans.
I disagree, it has almost nothing to do with Korean's. Albert Biermann of BMW fame, only joined Hyundai if he had 100% full control on the performance cars under him. All N models. A German has 100% say. The best we can do is hit the top top tier of influential Hyundai executives in the trenches of design, and in this case of the Hyundai tech Center in Michigan in "car planning"for North America. I can only assume they have access to him. If they keep hearing AWD AWD in the Kona we have a chance, but by that time , I guess I will leave Hyundai behind for COMPLETE lack of foresight in car model choice to manufacture.

I was thinking about this at work today. Hyundai can't make the Kona N AWD. I will say that again. "Hyundai CAN"T make the Kona N AWD". Because it will KILL the i30 N and Veloster N model bands too much. It will out perform both those models in launch, on the track, and on the street and on the street by a nice margin. They have to hamstring the Kona N to be strictly an "also ran". It hit me at work, Hyundai can't trip up the other models by out doing them with AWD especially if the put a front E-diff in a Kona N AWD.

We will have to make our own if we want that car, ot that may come 2 years from now. Here is a video of a tuned Golf R with 412 hp and a well designed DCT. The Kona N stock 2.0 liter lower end is "said " to be able to handle close 400hp as a max with adding an aftermarket big turbo,tune downpipe, intake, fuel pump, and injectors. But here is close to where a Kona N AWD would be modified, You have wheel spin but lack tire tramp that most 2WD get. So by default a Kona N would kill almost any 2WD Hyundai . 0-60 in 3.51 seconds read by Draggy.


 

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That Audi race car is a far cry from the Hyundai AWD system. It's designed for inclement weather, not ultimate performance. If I was serious about performance I wouldn't want to be saddled with extra weight just so I could drive in snow better.
 

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Discussion Starter #12 (Edited)
That Audi race car is a far cry from the Hyundai AWD system. It's designed for inclement weather, not ultimate performance. If I was serious about performance I wouldn't want to be saddled with extra weight just so I could drive in snow better.
The Hyundai doesn’t have Torsen diffs ,but the advantage of simpleton AWD shows its face daily for my sport driving. I am not saying they are the same, no one in their right mind would think that. I used that as way to show AWD makes a big difference vs 2WD I would own AWD in the desert, it makes that much difference in the corners.There are so many corners where my Kona pushes me through the corner and that reduces my understeer. Plus, a tire can do only so much when it steering and accelerating. Adding drive wheels in the rear lets more percentage of the front tires to do steering input that could not be done when the tire has to lay down 100% of the power too.

As for weight, I want more weight in the rear. When I added a steel wheel and full sized tire in my back hatch for when I tow my boat (50 added lbs) my car handled far better in the corners. When I come into a known testing exit clover leaf at 80 mph, I can toss the car into the corner and the car is balanced now. It hurt me by adding 50 lbs, but man did I gain a better balanced car.

AWD leads to far more confidence at the limit then many of the tuned fwd cars I have owned through my life. I is plan and simple a game changer EVEN in a simpleton form that all these FWD AWD systems are that a majority of manufacturers use now a days.

Rain is another classic example of the superiority of this simple AWD system. I can fly around corners and do things you could never do in a FWD Kona while driving in rain.
 

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My 2005 MINI had 210 HP at the front wheels. I had the suspension dialed in so it was a beast on the track. You could steer through curves with brake and throttle inputs. I would not have wanted AWD in that car. But it was much lighter and designed as a performance car from the start. Hopefully the N will be something like that.
 

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Discussion Starter #14 (Edited)
My 2005 MINI had 210 HP at the front wheels. I had the suspension dialed in so it was a beast on the track. You could steer through curves with brake and throttle inputs. I would not have wanted AWD in that car. But it was much lighter and designed as a performance car from the start. Hopefully the N will be something like that.
My Kona has about 220-230 hp and is lowered 2 inches, the suspension has been all reworked and tuned, with a couple more refinements waiting to see if Hyundai surprises me with an AWD Kona N, but that is a 5% chance. AWD minis preform better on the track in AWD form then FWD form what I has seen, same thing in Pro autocross.

Your car was not designed as a performance car. It was just a commuter sled, just like the Kona, WRX, Golf R, and others. With the very very few exceptions like the Miata and FRS that were designed as performance cars on the drawing board, minus their lack luster performance motor.

I hate to tell you, but the Kona was designed by X Audi/VW and BMW engineers, and the Kona AWD has almost exacting measurements as the Golf R. The Hyundai Multi-Link is basically VW multi link. What your mini has simpleton trailing arm suspension. How 1980’s.
 

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Yeah I was for certain going to trade in my Kona AWD limited for the Kona N if it came in AWD. Now I’m just gonna keep it and hope in the next few years they do release an AWD N. The N Line AWD will be nice for sure , also has a new engine where the N is built on an older platform.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
The N-Line from my research has the same suspension as the 2017-2020 AWD Limited/Ultimate North American cars. In my opinion under sprung, and just a hint of under optimally dampened for "aggressive sport driving", and I choose under damping vs over dampened German/European sport sedans.

The new engine will not give you much more performance other then it is dual injected, and carboned up valves and intake port will be a thing of the past. The torque figures are the exact same as the 2017-2021 1.6T.

Mostly just newer styling and a better sounding exhaust. Hopefully the 7 speed DCT has a better tuned "sport driving " algorithm, since the engineers wanted to match the looks to better performance that the old DCT coding lacked.
 
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