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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi,

I have to change winter tires on 3 vehicles. I'm getting tired of using the scissor jacks that come with each car so I purchased a Torin floor jack with the standard saddle.

Should jack pads be used with the jacks to prevent damage to the lip at the lift points? An online search for jack pads yielded some products but it doesn't seem like it's even an issue.

If i don't use a pad, the vehicle will be supported by that lip. Not sure if that's how it's supposed to be done. I did not check the scissor jacks to see if the slot is deep enough so that the car is supported by the steel frame on either side of the lip (probably is though).

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I have one of those rubber pucks, I don't use them, PITA. As long as you use the jack in a very close area to where Hyundai specs the jack point you can use no puck. I never use them. My metal lip has some small dents, but nothing big. No rust I can see yet, even in Minnesota as a daily.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Alright, I took a look at one of the 3 vehicles today (a 2006 Accent, not the Kona) and the frame profile at the lift point looks like this:
Font Parallel Brand Graphics Diagram


The scissor jack that comes with the car supports the car from one side of the pinch weld only. I'm assuming my mechanic lifted the car from the pinch welds at some point because one of them is bent quite a bit.

Anyways, I'll make a solid puck out of hardwood that will support this car like the scissor jack does and the slot will only ensure that the puck does not move around.

For what its worth, I always use a jack stand after the car is lifted and then remove some of the load from the jack.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I tried to lift the Mazda 5 with the jack's stock saddle and although it was ok for the first two wheels, the third one started to creak and crack with rusted metal bits falling on the floor (12-year old Mazda after all). So i dropped it and made a custom pad that would work on all three cars (2006 Accent, 2009 Mazda 5, 2022 Kona). They all had a similar profile to the above diagram and the scissor jacks that came with them all have a 1.25" x 1.25" bearing surface and all appear to lift the car from one side of the pinch weld. Worked beautifully. Bearing surface is a 1.5" x 1.5" piece of nylon from an old cutting board. The 1-1/8" aluminum round bar that fits into the jack is more or less centered on the bearing surface, not the actual pad.

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The Mazda I have a narrower jack point than other cars I had. I use a puck too. I did not have to with the Kona.

 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Yeah, i looked at those aluminum jack pads and it looks like they are designed to lift by the pinch weld. The rubber puck seem to do the same things since the depth of the groove is only about 1/4". The pinch welds depth on my cars seem to vary between 1/2" and 3/4".

I figured the same profile as the scissor jacks would be the best thing to do.
 
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