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Discussion Starter #1
So I need to get some snow tires soon and one possibility is to buy dedicated wheels for the snow tires. However, unless I spring for the expensive TPMS sensors in each new wheel, the car obviously is going to notice that. Plus, I gather that technically now tire shops aren't supposed to install non-TPMS wheels on TPMS equipped cars. Now I can get around that, but still.

This all assumes that the TPMS system in this car is the same as most, so I'm wondering if anyone knows.
 

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It primarily depends upon the Mhz for the particular TPMS. Hyundai has several but the Kona uses a 433 Mhz TPMS, if this helps . You can get them from Tire rack fo $32.00 each. The only other issue would be how it fits against the inside of the rim. However if you stick to these there won't be a problem.

https://www.tirerack.com/tpms/results.jsp?autoMake=Hyundai&autoModel=Kona+FWD&autoYear=2018&autoModClar=Ultimate

Blessings and Peace

I don't think these are the individual reading units, wouldn't you need OEM at least for early buyers of these units, the individual sending units may become available in the aftermarket later?? Did Tire Rack say these work as the individual OEMs do?


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Not really, any 433 Mhz TPMS unit will read on the system. It doesn't have to be produced for Hyundai specifically. They are easy to program to a specific vehicle. The TPMS system which Hyundai is registered for, utilizes any 433 Mhz TPMS sending unit.

Yes, the units work as advertised from Tire Rack for the Kona, as well as any Hyundai vehicle that utilizes a 433 Mhz TPMS. You can purchase the Hyundai TPMS units on eBay but they're considerably more expensive.

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Ok, that makes sense,



As for the original poster wanting sensors for his other set of tires, as I wish we could do too, but can't. You all do know that you can't just swap out tires and the car will relearn the new sensors. They have to be reprogrammed to the car, through the cars computer, through an advance scan tool. It really is kind of a crappy way to do it when in Europe and Canada have laws mandating dedicated snow tires. You would think Hyundai and all brands would have the TPMS system to allow 2 sets of TPMS sensors to be programed into the system so easy swap out and full use of the the MANDATED TPMS could access both sets. Nope. So you are then left to having to pay to reprogram the car on every swap since the car will only hold one set of TPMS sensors. I had ests of $50 to 75 each swap.


I watch this guys vids all the time, and shows the equipment needed,







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Discussion Starter #6
I've decided to use the OEM wheels at least this year so for now I'm not going to bother, but the main reason I asked is because apparently all TPMS systems are not the same. According to an article I read there are some that monitor the tire pressure without dedicated sensors in each wheel. That's mainly what I wanted to clarify, whether Hyundai did something different on the Kona. But it sounds like its the system used by most manufacturers.
 

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I just got off the phone with Discount Tire, they will reprogram and swap your tires/rims for free every year as long as you buy your new rims from them. I ask the guy what happens if I switch out the rims here at home , will you still reprogram the sensors into the car every swap ( it will save you swap time) and it makes no sense for me to not scuff up my interior hauling tires and rims around to have them put them on when I can just do it. He said yes they would just look up the file stating they sold me wheels for this car and they would reprgram the OEM wheels when winter time came. The guy I talked to has been in the tire biz for 20 years and I asked him if there any cheap china programmers and he said old used units are $750 to $1,000 and the readers are $300 old and used. Not worth it having your own units obviously. Their sensors are OEM Hyundai at $60 each and you need to buy them to offer the by yearly reprogramming.





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Good to know rbass930. They must have the same system and 433 Mhz TPMS sensors as the Kona. Thanks for sharing!

And the Canadian Konas don't even have a TPMS --- so winter tires much simpler
Wasn't aware they didn't. Interesting!

Blessings and Peace
 

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I purchased a set of 2018 Elantra rims for my Kona with the sensors intact, and my car automatically synced them up without issue.



Have you tested them by letting 5 psi out of one wheel and drive around the block and confirming a true reading?
 

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I purchased a set of 2018 Elantra rims for my Kona with the sensors intact, and my car automatically synced them up without issue.



Have you tested them by letting 5 psi out of one wheel and drive around the block to confirming a true reading?
 

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Ok, that makes sense,



As for the original poster wanting sensors for his other set of tires, as I wish we could do too, but can't. You all do know that you can't just swap out tires and the car will relearn the new sensors. They have to be reprogrammed to the car, through the cars computer, through an advance scan tool. It really is kind of a crappy way to do it when in Europe and Canada have laws mandating dedicated snow tires. You would think Hyundai and all brands would have the TPMS system to allow 2 sets of TPMS sensors to be programed into the system so easy swap out and full use of the the MANDATED TPMS could access both sets. Nope. So you are then left to having to pay to reprogram the car on every swap since the car will only hold one set of TPMS sensors. I had ests of $50 to 75 each swap.


I watch this guys vids all the time, and shows the equipment needed,



https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NGel9rsw8bQ




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The sensors in the wheels I bought from Tire Rack didn't need to be programmed, I installed them and before I got a 1/4 mile down the road they were working...
 

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Cool yonson, I'm glad for you they worked out of the box!! I thought Tire Rack might have programmed them. I know they do with you purchase wheel and tire combinations also.:smile:

Blessings and Peace
 

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I find the comments interesting, seeing my understanding of this process seems to be far different then others have posted. This is how I was told from Discount Tire and now a couple videos. The car needs to have a serial# of the sensor typed into the car's computer with a advanced $$$ scan tool that can program. Just as it shows in the video I previously posted. Now could, since the more recent cars can sense individual sensors to get each tire's own pressure, could they auto load these, this is what some posters are saying.


Has anyone who has switched away from their OEM Hyundai sensors on OEM rims and purchased new rims and sensors mail order, have you done a test to see if these new sensors are actually reading to the cars computer by dropping one tires pressure by 5 psi and driving around the block to verify that yes indeed the car's computer has an auto find feature with new sensors? Up to now, from what people have told me this can't be done and it is not designed that way. But they could be wrong since my dealers service manager said the Kona could not auto track the movement of a rotated tire in this system, and when I rotated them the unit clearly followed the flopped movement. Again, unimpressed with the modern day service managers knowledge at a high number of dealers. Many are order writers pushed up the ladder and not mechanics pushed up the ladder like I saw when younger.


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I think you understand service writers/managers are not mechanics, nor do they have the mechanical expertise or knowledge of a certified mechanic. They relay what the mechanic has to say about a particular issue or situation. Service writers sell/push particular programs offered by the dealership, in order to help the dealership to remain profitable. For example; I got my sons Kia Rio Serviced and they recommended that I have and Injection Induction Flush. This included; 1 bottle of Throttle Body Cleaner, 1 12 oz Bottle of Chevron Techron Fuel Additive. The bottle of TB cleaner was $10.00 and the Chevron Techron was $20.00.

One of the reasons I had it done was, my son doesn't take great care of his vehicles. The other is the Kia Rio doesn't have a fuel filter. There total cost was 116.99 for the particular service, of which was nearly half the cost of the total service of $285.08. Now, understanding I love my son and feel better about the condition of his car, I am satisfied. It doesn't negate the cost of the bottle of Chevron at $20.00 or the labor at $99.00 for the particular service or the overall cost. I had the opportunity to say no and did at first, but later thought about it and knew I wouldn't have time to do it myself. So, I had them do so in my stead. I don't have to be concerned about my vehicles, as they are covered under their Platinum Service Program.


Well, what does all this mean; well the dealership service underwriters sell you services rather needed or not. They're not experts or auto mechanics by a long shot, they're service underwriters (sellers of auto services.) If there is an actual mechanical or electronic issue that's causing a problem, it has to be diagnosed by an ASE certified mechanic who is employed at the dealership who advises the service underwriter.

The same if you go into a friendly auto mechanics shop. They're the service underwriters and the mechanic wrapped into one. Keeping in mind, not all mechanics are honest ones and not necessarily ones that claim to be in videos on You Tube. For who's benefit do they make such videos, our's or theirs? I'll let you determine this for yourself.

Yonson did purchase his from Tire Rack and I don't believe his telling you a story either. Keep in mind I appreciate your questions and input but sometimes, it's not as difficult as we tend to make it. If the ECU picked up the pressure reading from the sensors he installed after 1/4 mile, I might be inclined to say they programed themselves. Now does this mean they are utilizing the correct TPMS reg number, I don't know but it they are working none the less. Most certainly, they're being read by the ECU with the current pressure reading. Keeping in mind the ECU reads the most current pressure reading being sent to it by the TPMS. If it didn't, then the system it self might be faulty.:smile:
 

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Heck Mania1, you're far more of a mechanic then a Service a Manager will ever be!:grin:
 

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This why I perfected the indirect TPMS on the HRV. No tire sensor. It measures tire rotations.

It is quite accurate. I forgot to adjust pressure after tire rotation and the warning came up.
 

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Heck Mania1, you're far more of a mechanic then a Service a Manager will ever be!:grin:
So you don't like my comment on Service Managers? You haven't found that out too. When I was younger their seemed they were X mechanics that they seemed to move up to that position, now it's seems like service writers. As far as using Service managers for questions, now a days that is your only way to get answers even though it is harder to get an accurate answer. Years ago I could walk in the back wrenching bay and ask questions and not have issues, now a days that is a lot harder to do with insurance worries and the push for commission wrenching.


We still have not seen someone say they have done the test. Just saying they have a viable psi number does not mean it is accurate, it may use the old # and not give you a no sensor warning like I heard they can do when you have no sensors there. Not saying they are wrong, but an auto program feature seems a bit too advanced as of yet, when the only car company that has made a move to confront the issue of "summer rims/tires and winter rims/tires" is Lexus with an "A" and "B" sensor serial number input area in the computer. Like I said I am sure hopeful that Hyundai is the first manufacture to fix this issue with auto find sensing or the 2018 model year of every manufacture has been mandated to do it. But I guess since no one wants to test it, I will have to wait till I get my rims and I will post my findings.:plain:


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No, I just find you've got more on the ball then they possibly might have.

I agree with you; it used to be you could go back to the bays and talk to the mechanic but I believe those days are long gone. Dealerships log it off to safety now, however it was never a safety issue for most. You might actually establish a friendship with the mechanic, even give him a tip for his work. I hope for your guys sake who have mandatory snow tires legislated, this is an added bonus. This way you won't have to spend allot of extra money to switch. I may not have to do the same but we pay enough for the vehicles we purchase and maintain.

Sometimes these cost are increased unnecessarily, just as I commented above.:smile:

Blessings and Peace
 
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