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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Does anyone know if the LG Chem Battery was used for the 2021 Kona EV's - and if so, why it wasn't part of Recall Campaign 200 (to replace the batteries)? Also, were the 2021 Kona's part of Recall Campaign 196 (to limit charging capacity to 80-90%)? My question is, if the 2021's had the same batteries as the 19's & 20's that were recalled, why weren't the 21's recalled, or is that something that may happen in the future?

Related, does anyone know if the LG Chem Battery will be in the 2022 upgraded Kona EV's - or are they switching to the SK Innovation batteries that they'll be using in their new platform for the Ioniq 5 and other new EV's? One would think that they would - and that where they are replacing batteries in the 19's and 20's, they'll be swapping out the problem LG Chem batteries for SK Innovation ones.

My '19 Kona EV battery died in March. I am now in the process of having Hyundai buy the car back from me and want to know if I should even consider replacing it with a '21 or '22 Kona EV - or move on to something else.
 

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I believe the 21 -s batteries are not subject to the recall. If you look at the recall text on the Hyundai web page talking about the recall, they only mention the 2019 and 2020-s.
I recall reading they switched to using SK batteries, and when they replace the batteries the replacement will be also SK. It woudl be good if someone who had the battery swapped could confirm this.

I thought your battery has been approved and ordered? Did they go back on that? I recall some people got their battery replaced in as few as a couple of months.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Yes, would definitely like to get confirmation that the 21's and 22's are using SK Batteries. That would put the Kona back on the consideration list to replace my 2019, but if I can't confirm the battery in the car, then I can't go there again. Once bitten, twice shy.

There are a few of us on here who's cars just stopped working...some have batteries on order. That was never a consideration or discussion when I opened up a case with Hyundai Customer Care. Right out of the gate they stated that Recall Campaign 200 was about buying the cars back and not replacing the batteries.

I've got all my paperwork into the 3rd party company in Dallas, TX, calculating the buy-back price. I expect to receive an official "offer" from Hyundai this week with the price. Will let you know over at the other discussion I started, documenting this process.

In the meantime, any information anyone can confirm on the Kona 2021 & 2022 batteries would be much appreciated - including the expected (actual) arrival date of 2022 refreshed Kona's in the U.S.
 

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You hadn't considered that LG Chem would have simply corrected the fault and now manufactures perfectly adequate cells?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
No, I hadn't considered that LG Chem corrected the problem, because according to everything I've read they're still searching for a root cause for the '19-'20 battery issue. And if they found a root cause, easier and less expensive to fix that defect in your traction battery than to either 1) swap out entire batteries, or 2) buy the car back. Just using a bit of common sense and logic here, combined with everything I've tried to read on the subject.

I also point to the fact that Hyundai has switched to SK Innovation batteries for their upcoming Ioniq 5 sub-brand launch. That is a huge statement. The manufacturer wants to get as far away from this problem as possible and start fresh with the Ioniq Line. I wish logic - and my gut, wasn't telling me otherwise because it would be real easy to replace my '19 Kona SEL with an upgrade to a '21 or '22 Kona Limited.

Because of the increased cost, production delays, and extended timeline arrivals of some of the expected, new electric SUV's, I am now looking at plug-in hybrids...just to get the tax credit back and extend my gas money. Depressing. I feel like I am in Electric Vehicle No-Man's Land. The Kona was the perfect car in every way...until it died. And now I feel like I can't afford any of the new electric SUV's - or wait for them to arrive in the U.S.
 

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Have you looked at the WV Id.4? That is what I am looking at.

I cannot see how the LG batteries could be repaired. I can imagine that they could have fixed their manufacturing process and now they can make fine new batteries.
How would they drain the electrolite from the pouches, strip off the separator layer, somehow strip off the lithium plating. then flatten the electrode layers, than put it all back together?
Maybe it is doable but bound to be harder than just manufacturing a new battery from fresh ingredients.
 

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There have been many reports on various forums of owners outside the US having their battery packs replaced and zero reports that any have been removed and repaired. Additionally, some US owners are reporting that buybacks of their affected Konas have now been completed.
 

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Does anyone know if the LG Chem Battery was used for the 2021 Kona EV's - and if so, why it wasn't part of Recall Campaign 200 (to replace the batteries)? Also, were the 2021 Kona's part of Recall Campaign 196 (to limit charging capacity to 80-90%)? My question is, if the 2021's had the same batteries as the 19's & 20's that were recalled, why weren't the 21's recalled, or is that something that may happen in the future?

Related, does anyone know if the LG Chem Battery will be in the 2022 upgraded Kona EV's - or are they switching to the SK Innovation batteries that they'll be using in their new platform for the Ioniq 5 and other new EV's? One would think that they would - and that where they are replacing batteries in the 19's and 20's, they'll be swapping out the problem LG Chem batteries for SK Innovation ones.

My '19 Kona EV battery died in March. I am now in the process of having Hyundai buy the car back from me and want to know if I should even consider replacing it with a '21 or '22 Kona EV - or move on to something else.
Consider the following. 1) Not every battery that came from the LG Chem factory contained the problem fold. 2) It is nearly impossible to detect which of those batteries had the problem. 3) The cause of the manufacturing problem was found and then corrected. One should not assume that that factory will never be able to supply reliable batteries.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Good points by all. But the reality is that my Kona is dead and has to be bought back. With the battery already failed, I am in a tough spot with no choice to keep it and have it repaired; I have nothing to drive (except a loaner for now).

So, my focus is what do I do once I receive the buyback offer - and the loss of my long term loaner car from the dealership. I need something. If I want to stay in an electric SUV at my '19 Kona SEL price point, that is going to be challenging from multiple points - price, performance (range & power), demand (there is a new car shortage), and availability (many new electric SUV's won't be available until later this year or early 2022).

Vehicles that seem to get close are the Ford Mustang Mach-E CA Rt. 1 or AWD Extended Range (344 & 304 miles of tested range), the VW ID.4 (287 miles), Kia Niro EV (285 miles), and Chevrolet Bolt (277 miles). The latter 2 are barely SUV's - the Niro is more of a station wagon, the Bolt is something in-between. The Mustangs are around $50K+ and the VW ID.4 around 44K+. I bought my Kona SEL for around $37K.

I would like to consider a Kona again, but I am cautious after all that I've been through. And I don't want to even think that a future software update (for whatever reason) may compromise my range (again). That is what started it for me - Recall Campaign 196 - I lost 20% of my range, and that started souring me on Hyundai's. When my battery died, that was kind of the nail in the coffin...unless Hyundai would do me a solid with a loaner and an Ioniq 5.
 

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Worth noting too that some 2020s were not recalled. Those made later in the year had no problems (like mine).
 

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Hi La trucha..

The Kia Niro is basically the same thing as the Kona EV, no? Or, you could go for a non-defective 2020 or later Kona EV.

You do take a beating on price, but ( I believe you are in the US, right?) you get to keep the Federal Tax credit, and any other incentives you already collected.
Then you get the new, increased tax incentives on a new EV. So figuring all that in, you may not come out totally screwed.

If this was your first EV, you probably put in a home charger for it, so you do not have to take that hit again.
The tax credit is now at least 10K So you compare the buyback you get with with the new car "out of the door" price price minus all the new fed + state tax incentives...

.All that may be enough to offset the extra cost. If you swap for a new Hyundai, I expect that HMC may give you some discount on the new vehicle to lessen your pain.

If I decided to ditch the Kona, I would try to wait it out until the Ionique 5 comes out, It has some compelling features, such as the ability to feed power back into the house,
and better self-driving. I think the newer Kona-s and the Ionique both have a Heat Pump now, which would be at the top of my list, for improved winter battery performance.

Also, I would want to see how the brand new models like the Id.4 shake out,.
Who knows, we yet to find out about battery fires or other new car problems these new debutants may have.
The current shortage may get better over time.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Thanks Coder. I am getting closer to getting an offer - the gentleman calculating it from Sedgewick called me today asking for 2 final pieces of paperwork to finalize things. So, I expect to hear from Hyundai Customer Service next week sometime, depending on how long it takes them to review the proposed numbers.

Since my car is dead, as I've previously stated I really don't have a choice about taking the offer...only hoping it's near or close to what I paid for the car. But I will negotiate with Hyundai about what it will take to "make me whole" and potentially get me into another one of their EV vehicles (with conditions) to make us both happy.

I'm pretty adamant that the range and power would have to be comparable to the Kona (I was averaging 320 miles on a 100% charge). I would also want to keep the lifetime battery guarantee, and have being in the northeast - be able to get a battery warmer with the car. It being an Electric SUV is a no-brainer.

It will be interesting to see what they're willing to do (or not do). I'll keep updating folks here with details so that, perhaps, others can learn from my experience.
 
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