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Discussion Starter #1
Hi all, for the 2020 Kona model with the 1.6L turbo engine, Car and Driver said "The seven-speed dual-clutch automatic shifts quickly and smoothly once you're rolling, but it stumbles at low speed in parking lots and in bumper-to-bumper traffic, engaging and disengaging first gear hesitantly until the driver offers more throttle input". I"m not a car person, what "stumble in low speed" mean? Am I not going to like the car? I live in an area where there is a lot of traffic during rush hour. Why does the C&D person mention 1st gear if the transmission is auto?

Thanks
 

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Auto transmission still has gears. The word "gear" is used interchangeably with "speeds".
So the 7DC has 7 "gears" or "speeds" that are changed by the electronics rather than the driver w/ a manual clutch.

I have noticed this as well but it does not bother me.
Essentially the car does not like to be in 1st and pushes to be in 2nd all the time (for fuel efficiency, better torque ratios for power, etc). So when you are rolling around 10-20kph, the car is not really sure what you are trying to do and jumps back and forth all the time between 1 and 2.
 

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You would think that with this kind of ongoing public feedback they would sort out the DCT?? Other cars with DCT aren't this bad so why is the Kona version?
 

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Personally, unless one of the clutches is slipping due to premature wear, I think the issue is overstated. But it may be because I drive a manual as my daily, so I'm used to having to feather the clutch to smooth engagement from a stop in heavy traffic. If your experience is mostly/entirely with a torque converter automatic, then the experience will taking getting used to. Volkswagen uses a DCT for the Golf R and GTI that is lauded by auto journalists but bucks at low speed, as well.

My wife did mention this behavior while on an incline in heavy traffic. I tell her to not try to maintain the gap between the car in front of her, to instead let the car in front give enough space so you're fully engaged in 1st gear, like I do in my manual.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I don't know anything about turbo, how do I use it? does it kick in automatically when the car reaches a certain speed or RPM? or is it always on? googling this only gives me how the mechanics work.
 

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I don't know anything about turbo, how do I use it? does it kick in automatically when the car reaches a certain speed or RPM? or is it always on? googling this only gives me how the mechanics work.
You don't do anything to use a turbo except drive the car. A turbo has a turbine that spins from the exhaust gases produced by the engine. You know those plastic pinwheels that you blow onto to make it spin, and the more air you blow the faster the pinwheel spins? The pinwheel is the turbo, and the blowing of air is coming from the engine. The more you push the gas pedal, the more air is going into the engine (like you inhaling into your lungs) and thus the more exhaust gas (you exhaling) is blowing into the turbo, and thus the faster the turbo spins thus making more power.
 

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ok so if turbo is used at all times, then what exactly is turbo lag?
Turbo lag is the time between mashing the throttle and feeling the rush of torque from a turbocharged engine. The lag comes from the time it takes the engine to create enough exhaust pressure to spin the turbo and pump compressed intake air into the engine and is longest when the engine is in a low-rpm, low-load cruising situation.
If you’re wondering why somebody doesn’t make a turbo that makes full boost from idle on up to redline, there’s a very simple answer for that: like all engine parts, a turbo has to be matched to a specific rpm range to function correctly. A turbo that’s small enough to make a significant amount of boost under low-rpm situations would overspeed and possibly explode as soon as full throttle was hit. The opposite is also true—a turbocharger that makes the most peak power will make virtually no boost until well into the engine’s powerband. Most turbo setups are a compromise between these two scenarios.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
ok thanks for that. another question is, I am an average person who doesn't know anything about cars except how to drive using auto transmission. Should I be buying a car with a turbo charged engine? Apparently there are many things you can't do in one if you want the car to last a descent amount of time. Take a look at this video. I don't understand anything the guy said. Would a person have to follow all these things when driving a turbo charged car?
 

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ok thanks for that. another question is, I am an average person who doesn't know anything about cars except how to drive using auto transmission. Should I be buying a car with a turbo charged engine? Apparently there are many things you can't do in one if you want the car to last a descent amount of time. Take a look at this video. I don't understand anything the guy said. Would a person have to follow all these things when driving a turbo charged car?

Though that video has good points, a turbocharged engine, properly maintained should last well over 100k miles. The decision of for or against turbo charged engines is more about how you drive, and what you can afford. If you enjoy gobbs of low end, tire spinning power, a turbo is a way to go. Not saying you cannot do the same with a non-turbo charged engine, its just a bit harder without increasing displacement (engine size). The turbo model is more expensive initially do to added parts, and a strong engine build. Good news is the Kona does not require premium gas like most turbo engine do. What they have done is changed the timing, and used colder spark plugs to reduce whats called detonation. Detonation is exactly what it sounds like, it's when you get ignition before the spark plug fires, and before the cylinder hits the top of its stroke. If you intend to get the turbo model, its recommended to get a quality 5w-40 oil, instead of the 5w-30 recommend from factory, for a bit more protection, as recommended by all Hyundai performance aftermarket companies. Gas mileage is the same of better on a turbo vehicle, if you drive like a regular person. If you enjoy the increased power of a turbo vehicle, and plant your foot on the accelerator more, your gas mileage will surely decrease accordingly.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
ok thanks, that's helpful. but the question I have to consider is, if I don't plan on doing all those things the video says to do and not to do, should I buy a car with a non-turbocharged engine? I don't want to buy a turbocharged engine and screw it up.
 

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To me, a stand still acceleration seems laggy, but driving acceleration that turbo really kicks in, she zips.

As long as im not drag racing, its not a problem lol

My other car is a 2008 Dodge SRT Charger, so thats what i noticed and why i wouldnt get a small engine without a turbo.
 

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A turbocharged car takes no additional knowledge to own and operate. Forced induction (turbo and superchargers) tech has been around for decades. I doubt most owners of turbocharged vehicles are even aware.

Turbos aren't just for performance. Many automakers are using forced induction in everyday cars to achieve fuel economy standards or to get more horsepower out of a smaller engine due to the lower weight (which helps fuel economy) and, in some countries, to avoid a displacement tax (larger the engine, the larger the tax).
 

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Honestly, I think a lot of your questions and concerns will be answered by test driving both. I think it will really come down to your budget and which drives "better" to you. If you don't mind how the DCT behaves, like the extra power from the turbo, and can afford it, then you should consider it. Hyundai has the long warranty for a reason.
 

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ok thanks, that's helpful. but the question I have to consider is, if I don't plan on doing all those things the video says to do and not to do, should I buy a car with a non-turbocharged engine? I don't want to buy a turbocharged engine and screw it up.
There are many proponents of Turbo/Super Chargers, GDi (Gasoline Direct Engines), DCT (Dual Clutch Transmissions), etc.
Look around this board and you will find various opinions, including some people who have had to replace their DCT transmissions with less than 10k miles.
Each of these technologies adds complexity and along with that the potential for problems. Your 10/100000 mile warranty should cover most of these problems should they arise.
Since I had an older Hyundai with GDI and DCT, I was very happy to sell it when the used 60k mile warranty was up since it did not like creeping in NJ stop and go traffic. My 2019 Kona is an SEL and does not have a turbo, DCT, or GDI engine.
You might wish to look at some of Scotty Kilmer's videos on these technologies and also read other's experiences before making a decision.




Admittedly, Scotty would have you buy a 1993 celica. Your choice.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
I looked at the specs of the Kona and it doesn't say it has either the GDI or the DCT. do you know what it has?
 
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