Hyundai Kona Forum banner

41 - 51 of 51 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
32 Posts
Hi David, I could not agree more about being an EV supporter! I hear you!! Would you be worried or concerned about replacing one Kona electric with another?

I will have been without my Kona EV for almost 2 months now. I have a gas guzzling loaner from the dealership that has to go back at the end of next week. Hyundai has even closed my case and tells me that I have been reunited with my vehicle and it is all fixed - which is obviously untrue but leaves me somewhat helpless. The dealership cannot get any answers on the electric battery or the elusive tool or machinery to install it. My question now is what to do next? The loaner is taking $40+ of gas every 3 days and I miss driving an electric vehicle.

At what point do you move forward with complaints and where do you go to get things moving on this type of matter?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
343 Posts
Ah. This begins to make sense to me. They buy back the car from you for what you paid for it, OK... However, there is significant (actual) inflation in effect given the unbridled money printing the US is engaging in with no end in sight. So surprise, surprise...you cannot get a similar EV now for anywhere near the price you paid. There is a huge demand for new cars, so do not expect to get
any deals. As the inflation continues, HMC will be able to replace the batteries, and resell your buyback vehicle for more money than they paid you.
Usually, printing money causes a larger pool of $$$ to chase the same amount of actual goods, which kinda explains the "coincidental" demand and shortage of a whole bunch of things ( construction materials, housing . fuel). Take a look at the past year-s exchange rate history of 10 of the likely suspect currencies ( Canadian $, Australian $, Rand, Peso etc) You will see a trend line sloping down from left to right.

Mark my words, the purchasing power of your buyback amount is expected to drop further. This narrative, saying that campaign #200 was never about replacing the batteries, it was about buyback
all along is total BS. Just re-read what the announcements said before. This is something new, because they are on the same page as I am regarding the now and future purchasing power of the $.

Feel; free to correct me if you feel I got it wrong.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
343 Posts
Here is an interesting question about the buy-backs: what happens to the federal and state tax credits we have already got on the car? Woudl the buy-back be: What I paid for it, end of story.
Or what I paid for it minus the tax credits and / or state rebates. Makes a 10K difference for me.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
32 Posts
I think that you are absolutely correct on the buyback and losing out on the cost of the vehicle. As far as the tax credits go those are a done deal and should not weight in to any decision making on the value of the car.

The only thing I question is the #200 campaign - I had the exact same reaction as you when I first heard about it too but when I actually sat back and thought about it I have to say that it made sense at least for the 2019 Kona ev where Hyundai originally offered a free replacement of the electric battery for the life of the car - think about the potential cost to Hyundai for that. That alone could be an incentive for them not to replace the battery but move to a buyback at least on the 2019 models.

I have 2.5 years left to pay for the car and really wasn't planning to buy another vehicle so soon but if this continues for months or years then I will be forced to go down that route. In reality I have been months without my car and the loaner situation with the dealership is not ideal as the loaners are crappy cars and have to be returned every 2 weeks.

what is your situation as far as your car is concerned, Coder? - what year and model do you have?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
343 Posts
Suz, I have a 2019 Limited. So far it is still up and running with the 80% charge limit. I do not drive much these days, working from home full time.
Even if I have to go back to commuting, the 80% range still covers my commute, although on a really cold winder week it comes uncomfortably close to
not making the round trip.

If the state and federal incentives are ours to keep, the buyback does not sound all that bad. Effectively, what you paid plus ~ 10K, gives a pretty good
amount for a new car. Of course sales tax, shipping charges on the car and other dealer charges such as doc fees are not refundable, so
that all is a write-off.

As long as the car is driveable, I will continue driving it, as they currently do not offer any options for "still running" cars. If I end up with a dead car:

I would look at a different brand, possibly a Tesla Model 3, now that they got their fed. tax credit reinstated.
A WV Id.4 is also a possibility, cheapest they go is 42K. If the Ioniq 5 becomes available and not astronomically priced. maybe that, although I am pretty
unhappy with the BS way Hyundai is handling this.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
32 Posts
So we have the same model. Yep, the 80% charge info only came out after my vehicle stopped working after an 87% charge one night. I test drove the VW ID4 last week - nice car but I don't like the funky controls on it and it certainly doesn't have the peppy take off or ride that the Kona had. It feels a little bit sluggish to me which is not ideal. Also, the Tesla 3 is ok but I am not that impressed with the craftsmanship of the vehicle as a number of them have misaligned body parts and windows. Test drove the Tesla Y 2 weeks ago too.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Hi All, I have the 2019 Kona Electric Limited (purchased in Oct of 2019). I've had all the recalls to reduce the charging to 80%. I've read all the articles about the battery replacement recall but they all end around March of this year. I've gotten no more information from Hyundai, the dealer where I purchased the vehicle (Rowe Hyundai Westbrook, Maine) or the place I service the vehicle in Hampton, New Hampshire. I know there are at least a couple of your (Suz and La Trucha Loca) that have had their car lock up and had to be towed to the dealer but have had no news as well.

I just want to keep this thread going since it's getting frustrating to have to live with 80% charge limit not to mention the thread of something worse happening. Anyone with more information?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
36 Posts
Discussion Starter · #48 ·
Dave here again. Well, Sedgewick (3rd party Kona EV Buy-Back documentation specialists) has collected all the information they needed from me (purchase & sale agreement, title, registration, finance charge documentation, and other incidental charges) and forwarded it to their folks to calculate a buy-back price to send to Hyundai Motor Corporation of America for approval. Once approved, which could take up to 2 weeks, Hyundai will send me an offer letter with a buy-back price for my acceptance (it's not like I have a choice, with a dead car).

My Hyundai Case Specialist said she would put together a short list of Electric SUV's that I might consider to replace the Kona. I talked with her about "making me whole" - that I wasn't planning on buying, registering, or insuring a new car at this point, and didn't have "extra" money to do so. One of the things that I hope they may consider is giving me a loaner until I can purchase a new vehicle and helping me get into another Electric SUV, that maybe I can't quite afford now, but as a gesture of goodwill or something. Yeah, I know - wishful thinking.

Will continue to keep you all updated as I learn more information.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
32 Posts
I have called Hyundai Customer Care and Hyundai Customer Service and and still getting nowhere. When I called a new number last week the lady I spoke with said "there are lots of options open to you" and offered to look into my case. Needless to say, she came back on the line 5 minutes later and said "give us a call when you are reunited with your vehicle" - when I asked what happened to all the options she mentioned earlier in the call she stuttered and was obviously being told by someone else to get me off the line. Finally, I said " how about you buy back this POS car and I go buy another make and model?" - suddenly the whole tone of the call changed and she was happy -"yes, of course we can help you with that" and she said that someone would call me back with an offer in 7-10 business days - that was over a week ago and still waiting (but not holding my breath on that one)

Right now I am evaluating 3 options -

1.Keep waiting and have Hyundai pay my monthly finance fees when this is all over - be it 1 or 2 years down the line, all the time driving yet another crappy loaner from the dealership.
2.Have them give me an offer that I know will be crap (based on other folks stories) and work at a loss to get a new vehicle.
3.Start a class action lawsuit (meeting with a potential lawyer next week) to see what we can do
Other than that, I am trying not to stress about not having my electric car and looking at all of the new makes coming on the market in 2022.
I cannot believe that a car manufacturer treats customers in such a shabby manner and does not care about its reputation.
H -- Hellish experience (what this has been)
Y -- Why isn't my car working?
U -- Uncommunicative
N -- Nothing - what Hyundai is doing about the problem
D -- Dead - which is what my car and battery is
A -- Angst which they are inducing
I -- Imagining it all will be resolved
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
32 Posts
Here is some breaking news - a woman in San Diego just got an offer letter to buy her car back (it had been at the dealership since 4/27) and minutes later got a call that her battery was in and she could pick up the car Saturday.

WTF - what about those of us who have been waiting for longer than that? I will be making calls this morning that is for sure.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
343 Posts
One of the things that I hope they may consider is giving me a loaner until I can purchase a new vehicle and helping me get into another Electric SUV, that maybe I can't quite afford now, but as a gesture of goodwill or something. Yeah, I know - wishful thinking.
Man, you are an optimist.. You expect to get some extra money from Hyundai so you can get a non-Hyundai Suv?
If you are not ready to buy something else now, taking a buyout offer makes no sense. You are better off hanging on to the Kona EV,
they are likely to give you a loaner, so why not do that?

One you take a buyout offer, the manufacturer has no further obligation towards you, and will not give you the time of the day.

PLease keep us posted. Curious about how they handle any tax refund.
 
41 - 51 of 51 Posts
Top