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Here’s my vin if anyone can get a better answer than I did.
KM8K53AG8LU092765
2020 Kona EV Ultimate

according to the website, if a recall has been repaired it shows up as zero. Still doesn’t tell you what the recall was for.

This morning I’ll find out the manufacture date from the door jamb sticker as well as the actual NHSTA recall number and description of whatever recall is showing up. If it’s #200 or if the manufacture date is March of 2020 or early, I’m pulling the plug on the deal. If they can put together a comparable deal on a 2021 then we’re good. If not, then we’ll be done.

Thanks so much to everyone for your valuable and well informed feedback. You very well may have helped me to avoid a potential ****storm.
 

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Ok so the sales rep sent me two separate technical service bulletins and photo of the door jamb sticker with manufacture date. Not sure if I’ll be able to attach the images.
Any feedback would be greatly appreciated!

Update: I spoke with the service manager and confirmed that the charging capacity had not been reduced to 80% and he also confirmed that this car was not part of the battery recall so I think I feel secure enough to move forward on this deal. Thanks to everyone for lots of valuable information.
5252
5253
5254
 

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MY20 Hyundai Kona Highlander
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Enjoy your vehicle.
 

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I just received (12 May 2021 via Email) another recall notice on the high voltage battery problem. I live in California, USA. Apparently, the problem has been traced to a potential unintended fold in the lithium coated Anode during manufacture. It has been decided that the previous recall fix was not a sufficient enough remedy to prevent the potential fires. A new recall, 200, has been added to the first. It requires that the battery not be charged above 80% as indicated on the battery monitoring display. The owners are requested to change the maximum charge level, for all charge scenarios, to 80%, or take it to a dealer to have that done. If one is subscribed to the BlueLink application they will soon try to remotely program the maximum charge level to 80%. Once this is done the owners are requested to take the car to a Hyundai dealer to have the 80% setting confirmed. The notice said that after that maximum setting is confirmed by the dealer then the user can request a $200 gift card due to the inconvenience of the reduction in range. Personally, I would prefer a new HV battery be installed. It is understandable that Hyundai is trying to avoid that very expensive remedy.

In the FAQ it noted that no incidents of the battery causing a fire has been reported in the U.S.
 

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I just received (12 May 2021 via Email) another recall notice on the high voltage battery problem. I live in California, USA. Apparently, the problem has been traced to a potential unintended fold in the lithium coated Anode during manufacture. It has been decided that the previous recall fix was not a sufficient enough remedy to prevent the potential fires. A new recall, 200, has been added to the first. It requires that the battery not be charged above 80% as indicated on the battery monitoring display. The owners are requested to change the maximum charge level, for all charge scenarios, to 80%, or take it to a dealer to have that done. If one is subscribed to the BlueLink application they will soon try to remotely program the maximum charge level to 80%. Once this is done the owners are requested to take the car to a Hyundai dealer to have the 80% setting confirmed. The notice said that after that maximum setting is confirmed by the dealer then the user can request a $200 gift card due to the inconvenience of the reduction in range. Personally, I would prefer a new HV battery be installed. It is understandable that Hyundai is trying to avoid that very expensive remedy.

In the FAQ it noted that no incidents of the battery causing a fire has been reported in the U.S.
Correction: I received the Email notice on Monday, 12 April 2021.
 

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...Personally, I would prefer a new HV battery be installed. It is understandable that Hyundai is trying to avoid that very expensive remedy.
There's no understanding that Hyundai are avoiding replacing the battery in affected cars. The 80% is an interim measure only.
 

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Hi Blackmax, I checked the VIN number you posted. The Hyundai recall check page is here:
Your VIN comes up as "not affected" by recall #200 so you appear to have have a propulsion battery that is OK.
 

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I just received (12 May 2021 via Email) another recall notice on the high voltage battery problem. I live in California, USA. Apparently, the problem has been traced to a potential unintended fold in the lithium coated Anode during manufacture. It has been decided that the previous recall fix was not a sufficient enough remedy to prevent the potential fires. A new recall, 200, has been added to the first. It requires that the battery not be charged above 80% as indicated on the battery monitoring display. The owners are requested to change the maximum charge level, for all charge scenarios, to 80%, or take it to a dealer to have that done. If one is subscribed to the BlueLink application they will soon try to remotely program the maximum charge level to 80%. Once this is done the owners are requested to take the car to a Hyundai dealer to have the 80% setting confirmed. The notice said that after that maximum setting is confirmed by the dealer then the user can request a $200 gift card due to the inconvenience of the reduction in range. Personally, I would prefer a new HV battery be installed. It is understandable that Hyundai is trying to avoid that very expensive remedy.

In the FAQ it noted that no incidents of the battery causing a fire has been reported in the U.S.
The Recall Notice I received is titled "IMPORTANT SAFETY RECALL (INTERIM NOTICE)". It also says, "You will receive a second notification letter when the remedy is available, and the Battery System Assembly will be inspected, and replaced - if necessary." Also, my Blue Link updated my charge settings to 80% for both L2 and L3 charge stations. Hyundai has now done an OTA update!! Woohoo!

@Gasbuggy I see no indication of your accusation that "Hyundai (is trying) to avoid that very expensive remedy." When you post such speculation, it might be a good idea to identify to others that you are making unfounded guesses. All of the press releases over recent weeks have clearly stated that they are building tens of thousands of replacement battery packs in order to implement their remedy. In the "INTERIM", I will continue to use my Kona Electric daily, charging a little more often on my home L2 charge station, and park it 15 ft away from my house - easy since I have a nice long cord.
 

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Kiwi,

One piece of good news: LG and SK apparently sorted their differences, so it looks like SK will not be banned from the US after all.
In all likelihood, the replacement batteries will be supplied by SK ( Hyundai said so). It is much cheaper to truck these to dealers from the US than to get them here by boat from China or Korea.
So that would make sense, in the US at least.

On the minus side. the 1st of the 2 SK battery plants will not start full scale production until 2022, so that gives us a rough idea when they can really start proactive battery replacements. I bet, that for now, only those batteries that actually show early signs of failure will be replaced. There is also a cash flow aspect of taking the hit, plus the time value of money... From a financial perspective it makes all kinds of sense for them to drag this out as long as possible. We will have to see how the Ioniq 5 and their new truck launch goes.
Sadly, if those go well, that is bad news for those of us waiting for battery replacement. If prospective new customers of those new vehicles are undeterred by the battery debacle (and the sound of gnashing teeth from existing EV customers) then there is really no motivation for getting this quickly resolved.

I think the calculus on this goes like: Which depresses Hyundai stock more? A drop in profitability because they are burning their cash rapidly replacing the batteries, or the bad PR if they drag their feet? It is to some degree a wait and see thing. Just how bad is the bad PR going to get? Are there going to be more high profile battery fires, esp in the US?
 

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I think the calculus on this goes like: Which depresses Hyundai stock more? A drop in profitability because they are burning their cash rapidly replacing the batteries, or the bad PR if they drag their feet? It is to some degree a wait and see thing. Just how bad is the bad PR going to get? Are there going to be more high profile battery fires, esp in the US?
Just to be clear, I post pure speculation. I am likely totally wrong and have not a clue. :)
 

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There's no understanding that Hyundai are avoiding replacing the battery in affected cars. The 80% is an interim measure only.
There's no understanding that Hyundai are avoiding replacing the battery in affected cars. The 80% is an interim measure only.
Tens-of-thousands of the cars affected by the initial recall are considered to be affected. Consider that Hyundai is unlikely to have the ability to determine which of those vehicle's batteries suffer from the folded-over Anode problem. The problem was likely found through forensics on some of the tiny number of batteries that were destroyed.
 

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Tens-of-thousands of the cars affected by the initial recall are considered to be affected. Consider that Hyundai is unlikely to have the ability to determine which of those vehicle's batteries suffer from the folded-over Anode problem. The problem was likely found through forensics on some of the tiny number of batteries that were destroyed.
After reading the replies that followed my initial posting I'm glad to hear that there will eventually be HV battery replacements as a final solution to the folded Anode issue. I still wonder if the Hyundai dealers have the ability to detect what tiny fractions of the batteries, affected by the recall, suffer from the folded Anode issue.

I responded to the first recall and had my dealer deal with the recall issue. I assume they were unable to detect a problem and that they installed the required battery management software that was created to deal with issue that they knew about at that time. At that time they made no mention that there might be further actions taken to deal with the recall issue.
 

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Gasbuggy,

As far as I understand, the folded anode problem is a feature of how the anode strips were manufactured. There is a long anode strip that is folded up into the correct lengths, then cut to size at the fold. Consequently, the ends of the resulting anode strips have a sharp bend, which may puncture the separator layer, as the battery experiences movement, such as swelling and shrinking. There is a picture of the x-section from a Bolt battery, some people think this is the exact same issue for the Kona. Confusing the explanation is the word "tab", which implies something external to the battery cell that would be used to connect it to the rest of the car. Based on the picture, perhaps "strip" would be more appropriate. Here is the pic:

After the "folded anode..." root cause was announced, Hyundai shortly announced that they intend to replace all batteries that were manufactured this way. The charge limit that has been suggested as a workaround to minimize any thermal movement. The 176 recall introduced extra monitoring for cell voltage imbalance, cell temperature increase, and cell voltage drop while the car is sitting idle. If the amped up monitoring detects those symptoms, it disables the car, and at that point you have to have it towed to the dealer, where you go to the head of the list for battery replacement.

Note that I am not an expert, I could be misinterpreting the bits and pieces of information that has been posted.
I urge you to arrive at your own conclusions, using the power of your own critical thinking.
 

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I think your summary is correct, @coder, and aligns with my own understanding. One detail I'm still pondering is where the "fold" is located because it was mentioned somewhere that it could be made safe with some insulating tape (presumably Kapton) during manufacture. I'd wonder if it's on the end as the photo shows or somewhere else since putting tape there doesn't seem as practical as simply eliminating the fold. Certainly the fold in the photo looks to be a risky design choice given that the sheared end would be sharp and how close it lies to the separator.

Either way I believe that all LG Chem cells covered within the recall dates are susceptible to failure given the correct conditions and that Hyundai have no way of determining if any are still usable.
 

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Sorry I meant recall #196 not #176
Thank you for those images and diagrams. You made a good point about the folds but you are assuming an intended fold that is deliberately cut, not an unintended fold that occurs during manufacture. That could have happened via automated equipment and yet not be detected by QC steps. The fault could occur in perhaps 1 of 100,000 manufactured cells. The cell tabs are likely connected to other cell tabs as there is a large number of series connections is such batteries. That fault appears to be mechanical. Typical electrical test equipment as well as battery monitoring logic may not be able to detect a cell that is somewhat marginal with this specific mechanical problem.

I just received a letter regarding the amended Recall 196 with the Recall 200 amendment. It states the following.

"What is the problem?
The subject vehicles are equipped with battery cells manufactured in the LG Energy Solutions China (Nanjing) plant in which the Anode (Negative ) tab can be folded . A folded Anode tab in the battery cell could allow the lithium plating on the Anode tab to contact the Cathode resulting in an electrical short."

Note that it didn't say the fault occurs where the fold is. It stated that the tab CAN be folded. That to me suggests a fold that is not intended to be there.

When a company is potentially liable for serious financial and legal liabilities I always expect them to not be completely frank with all the technical details that could be used against them.
 

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I think your summary is correct, @coder, and aligns with my own understanding. One detail I'm still pondering is where the "fold" is located because it was mentioned somewhere that it could be made safe with some insulating tape (presumably Kapton) during manufacture. I'd wonder if it's on the end as the photo shows or somewhere else since putting tape there doesn't seem as practical as simply eliminating the fold. Certainly the fold in the photo looks to be a risky design choice given that the sheared end would be sharp and how close it lies to the separator.

Either way I believe that all LG Chem cells covered within the recall dates are susceptible to failure given the correct conditions and that Hyundai have no way of determining if any are still usable.
I agree that Hyundai may not have the means of detecting if there is a suspect cell buried within the battery pack. That may help explain why this amended recall (200) followed their previous remedy, specified in Recall 196. That prior effort may have been just an attempt to show that they were taking some actions to address the situation.
 

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Thank you for those images and diagrams. You made a good point about the folds but you are assuming an intended fold that is deliberately cut, not an unintended fold that occurs during manufacture. That could have happened via automated equipment and yet not be detected by QC steps. The fault could occur in perhaps 1 of 100,000 manufactured cells. The cell tabs are likely connected to other cell tabs as there is a large number of series connections is such batteries. That fault appears to be mechanical. Typical electrical test equipment as well as battery monitoring logic may not be able to detect a cell that is somewhat marginal with this specific mechanical problem.
I agree it could be a simple mechanical problem. For example, anode tab on cell (pouch) being folded back - or partly folded back - onto side of cell. This would be less likely to cause a problem if it was folded back onto the anode side, but would almost inevitably fail if folded back on the cathode side. The difficulty (perhaps impossibility) would be in detecting which, if any, of the 98 cells in the 10 modules of the battery pack was affected. But like everyone else I’m speculating.
 

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... That may help explain why this amended recall (200) followed their previous remedy, specified in Recall 196. That prior effort may have been just an attempt to show that they were taking some actions to address the situation.
It seems that 196, implemented about May to late 2020, was also quite effective at improving safety based on the stats we have so far. About 17 incidents occurred prior to that and 'only' two afterwards (see history link below.) Judging by the timing it appeared that the latter event was what triggered the global recall (200) but it's come to light since then that the suspected root cause was eliminated in production after late March 2020. Hyundai may have needed that time to statistically determine that there was a high probability that this was indeed the problem and that complete pack replacement was the only practical solution. They were also pushed along by the related S. Korean safety regulatory agency.
The 196 software change I believe could be hampered by the apparent fact that the voltage sense resolution on each parallel set of three cells is a mere 0.02 V. That does not leave much precision to detect short-term OCV anomalies and perhaps that's why it seems to have a hair-trigger.
... which, if any, of the 98 cells in the 10 modules of the battery pack was affected...
Just noting that there are 294 cells, 98 sets of three in parallel.

 

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It seems that 196, implemented about May to late 2020, was also quite effective at improving safety based on the stats we have so far. About 17 incidents occurred prior to that and 'only' two afterwards (see history link below.) Judging by the timing it appeared that the latter event was what triggered the global recall (200) but it's come to light since then that the suspected root cause was eliminated in production after late March 2020. Hyundai may have needed that time to statistically determine that there was a high probability that this was indeed the problem and that complete pack replacement was the only practical solution. They were also pushed along by the related S. Korean safety regulatory agency.
The 196 software change I believe could be hampered by the apparent fact that the voltage sense resolution on each parallel set of three cells is a mere 0.02 V. That does not leave much precision to detect short-term OCV anomalies and perhaps that's why it seems to have a hair-trigger.
Just noting that there are 294 cells, 98 sets of three in parallel.

Thank you for the Recall 200 attachment chronology. That was very helpful in understating the situation. I'm glad to know that the previous remedy is somewhat effective in detecting the anomaly and reducing the chances of it becoming worse.
 
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