Hyundai Kona Forum banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hi guys,

I am replacing my rear brake pads on my 2018 Hyundai Kona 1.6T.
I am having problems removing the "parking brake cable fixing clip", I am not sure how to remove it!

Derrick
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,060 Posts
You don't need to remove the clip to pull the rear brake caliper from what I have seen. Leave it. The clip is only needed if you pull the control arm or replace a cable. IF you do find you can't get the caliper off, which I think you can. (99% you can) The next move is to go the inside of rear swing arm there are 2) 10mm nuts holding the parking brake cable in position as the cable goes through the rear control arm. Undo those 2 nuts. The upstream up from that mounting point there is another "cable hard point locator" that is between the 2) 10 mm nuts to the pivot point of the rear swing arm mounting point to the unibody of the car. Undo that 10mm bolt and you have front to rear movement of the cable. Again, I don't think you will need to do it, but you know what to do to get the caliper off if your car differs then most.

Different brand brakes? I will be doing that next. I was suppose to call a brake manufacture today since I had today off and see if they were going to put their sport pad material out for the Kona AWD 1.6T. They have a part# for it , but it is dead. So maybe a future item not out to the public yet. I was too busy installing my seat belt racing harness and for got to call them. Otherwise their premium plus one will have to do for testing against the OEM pad material.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Thank you for the reply!
I was trying to follow the exact procedures from the manual.
I will give it another try and see how i go :)
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
84 Posts
It helps if you disconnect the Cable from the Caliper first. Takes tension off the cable. I worked as an Auto Tech. Had to replace the rear rotors on a (Forget year) Tucson. Had to unbolt the shock. And disconnect one of the arms back there. Just to get the Caliper Mounting bolt out. It was an AWD model.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,060 Posts
It helps if you disconnect the Cable from the Caliper first. Takes tension off the cable. I worked as an Auto Tech. Had to replace the rear rotors on a (Forget year) Tucson. Had to unbolt the shock. And disconnect one of the arms back there. Just to get the Caliper Mounting bolt out. It was an AWD model.
To disconect the cable on a new non stretched rear brake cable setup on at least my Kona AWD, you need to undo all the locating holders I stated in the previous post. That only takes 4 minutes. I had to do this when I pulled my rear swing arms when installing my Veloster N bushings. I should be putting rear pads on my car in the next 2 weeks, so I will be person # 2 to try to see if we can pull the rear caliper away from the rotor.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,060 Posts
I installed my rear brake pads and you do not need to unattach the cable in any way. You do have to muscle it off and you do need to get/buy/rent free at auto parts store ( I made mine) the tool to spin the rear caliper piston back into the caliper IF you are added new brake pads. OR you can get one of these "cubes" at an auto parts store where you use a 3/8 socket ratchet with an extension to push and spin at the same time. This is you cheapest and easiest route to go, but many say they can be hard to use on brand new calipers and very old rusted calipers. Also I don't know if it fits the Hyundai grove pattern. Front calipers all you need is a C clamp because the piston can be pushed straight in with out the need to be spinning while pushing in.


 

·
Registered
Joined
·
504 Posts
I installed my rear brake pads and you do not need to unattach the cable in any way. You do have to muscle it off and you do need to get/buy/rent free at auto parts store ( I made mine) the tool to spin the rear caliper piston back into the caliper IF you are added new brake pads. OR you can get one of these "cubes" at an auto parts store where you use a 3/8 socket ratchet with an extension to push and spin at the same time. This is you cheapest and easiest route to go, but many say they can be hard to use on brand new calipers and very old rusted calipers. Also I don't know if it fits the Hyundai grove pattern. Front calipers all you need is a C clamp because the piston can be pushed straight in with out the need to be spinning while pushing in.



Ah forgot to warn you about the rear caliper ratcheting piston. I just used needle nose pliers.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,060 Posts
I knew about that, I thought the one I made for my old Audi shop would work. It was too big by 2 mm, so I just TIG welded the tab another 6mm. It is so nice to have a TIG to make/fix custom tools.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top