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Discussion Starter #1
I noticed this was noted on my window sticker. Wasn't noted on my 2018 Elantra GT. I assumed they were the same engine, but a little research yielded some answers on the "Atkinson" part but no clarity on if all 2.0s were Atkinson cycle.

From what I read Hyundai uses control of the intake valves to hold them open longer to shorten the compression stroke (effective not actual) compared to the combustion.

Most of the articles I read were related to hybrid models using this engine, adding to the lack of clarity.

I assume this cycle is not active 100% of the time similar to DoD that GM used to make a V8 a "V4".
 

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2018 Kona limited.
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I noticed this was noted on my window sticker. Wasn't noted on my 2018 Elantra GT. I assumed they were the same engine, but a little research yielded some answers on the "Atkinson" part but no clarity on if all 2.0s were Atkinson cycle.

From what I read Hyundai uses control of the intake valves to hold them open longer to shorten the compression stroke (effective not actual) compared to the combustion.

Most of the articles I read were related to hybrid models using this engine, adding to the lack of clarity.

I assume this cycle is not active 100% of the time similar to DoD that GM used to make a V8 a "V4".

Its effectively variable valve timing, and in-which gas both the intake and exhaust valves are controlled. Changing the duration the valves are open has a host of effects including better fuel economy, lower emissions, more low end torque, etc..
 

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Not all 2.0's are Atkinson's and they also tweak the Atkinson a bit depending on the vehicle. Hyundai's Nu MPi 2.0 is rated between 147-154hp depending on those tweaks. Bascially, as 1fastKona says, its a way of using changing valve durations. The engine sacrifices torque and HP to improve fuel efficiency under some circumstances.

Personally, I find that the 2.0 in my Kona still offers plenty of power. Its not like you are getting a traditional economy four banger with all the performance sacrifices you usually expect with those.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Doing some more reading.....and then looking at photos of the injectors I am pretty sure the 2.0 Atkinson version is not GDI. I could hear the fuel pump cycling down when I turned off my GT. It even mentioned in the owners manual there would be some unusal noises after turning the engine off.....sure don't get that with the Kona.

Mind you I am not complaining, just interested in the differences and engineering behind them.
 

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2019 SE sonic silver
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Not all 2.0's are Atkinson's and they also tweak the Atkinson a bit depending on the vehicle. Hyundai's Nu MPi 2.0 is rated between 147-154hp depending on those tweaks. Bascially, as 1fastKona says, its a way of using changing valve durations. The engine sacrifices torque and HP to improve fuel efficiency under some circumstances.

Personally, I find that the 2.0 in my Kona still offers plenty of power. Its not like you are getting a traditional economy four banger with all the performance sacrifices you usually expect with those.
As a 2.0 SE owner, I have been trying to do some research to find out what my specific engine is, as even the fsm has little to no info on the non turbo models. I did find the info about the Atkins engine, but got a bit confused when a "Nu" version (replaced the theta from what I could tell?) also showed up.. but I really couldn't clarify if the Kona had that version too. How can I find out exactly what engine my 2019 SE actually has? Would my VIN give any clues at all? I am kind of doing a little research/comparisons/compilation on the pcv valve failures/engine replacements, and would like to know 100% what engine my girl is actually "packing under the hood" while I'm at it. TIA for any help. :)
 
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